Toyota 2.2 D-4D New Engine of Choice

Discussion in 'General Auto Conversion Discussion' started by kumaros, Mar 25, 2005.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Mar 25, 2005 #1

    kumaros

    kumaros

    kumaros

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2005
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Athens, Greece
    In the AeroCanard I want to build, having ordered the plans and expecting delivery thereof, I want to install a turbo-diesel auto-conversion.
    I was contemplating the Mercedes Benz or Volkswagen 3.0 liter V6 225HP turbo-diesels, but their weight at ~ 450 pounds seems prohibitive; then I thought of two Mitsubishi Colt 1.5 liter 95 HP turbo-diesels, strapped together ala Leon brothers, twin-Suzuki Cozy, or at opposite ends of a Cozy/Defiant hybrid; the new engine of choice, however, outshining everything else in every discipline, weight, horsepower, torque, fuel consumption, seems to be the all new Toyota D-4D Clean Power turbo-diesel to be used in the Toyota Avensis and the Lexus IS: 2.2 liter, in-line four cylinders, 175 HP at 3600 RPM, 400 Nm (300 foot pounds) of torque from 2000 to 2600 RPM, all aluminum construction with cast iron liners, ~ 160 kg (~ 350 lbs.), manufactured in the all new Toyota factory in Poland with a capacity of 150000 engines a year.
    For an article on the new Toyota Avensis and this engine, including a couple of pictures of the engine, go to:
    http://www.japanesecarfans.com/news.cfm/newsid/2050301.011
    With a cog-belt PSRU, to take advantage of the few HP above the torque peak at 2600 RPM, to take care of any resonance problems and to raise the prop-shaft, it should be the ideal engine for a Cozy/AeroCanard.
    What do you think?
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2005
  2. Mar 25, 2005 #2

    orion

    orion

    orion

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Messages:
    5,800
    Likes Received:
    135
    Location:
    Western Washington
    Haven't heard of that one - the engine sounds great. However, do not use the cog belt if you want any reliability and life. The reduction drive will be the key element of the installation - don't be cheap. Do your research and homework and select (or design and build) a drive that is specifically configured for the loading and torque peaks encoutered by the particular engine.
     
  3. Nov 13, 2006 #3

    puggo123

    puggo123

    puggo123

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2006
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    England
    Auto diesels in aircraft

    Hi Kumaros,

    your choice of engine is interesting. We too had looked at this engine. However your choice could include many other new diesels.

    The latest high horsepower diesels include
    Peugeot / Ford DV6 - 138hp 4 cylinder, 750,000 made per annum
    Honda 2.2litre - approximately 140hp
    VW 2.0litre - 170hp top spec
    Fiat 2.4litre 5 cylinder estimated 180hp
    VW 3.0litre 220hp

    As Orion suggests the reduction drive will be critical to the durability of the installation. Please note that all these engines require an electronic controller to operate. If this fails you stop flying. The Toyota engine has piezo-electric injectors and they fire up to 7 times per firing stroke as compared to the old mechanical injection of just once. This is the key to their higher horsepower and longevity.

    There are alternatives to auto engines. I've participated in the installation of a Wilshck diesel in a Vans RV9. It is just undergoing its flight testing and so far seems very promising.

    regards
    Puggo
     
  4. Nov 14, 2006 #4

    Falco Rob

    Falco Rob

    Falco Rob

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    While all these new auto engines look to be very promising for us in the experimental arena, has anyone yet actually tried to buy one?

    Will the manufacturers sell a complete engine to an individual to use for whatever purpose he desires, without question or conditions?

    I'm assuming here that no one would be careless enough to mention the words "experimental aircraft" during these negotiations - that would no doubt bring the shutters down immediately - I was just wondering if any one out there has ever actually purchased a new engine for non automotive use.

    Rob
     
  5. Nov 27, 2006 #5

    Oddballhyde

    Oddballhyde

    Oddballhyde

    Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    As an aside, I heard an interesting bit of information about engines yesterday. This was from a mate of mine who has a very successful business repairing auto engine ignitions here in South Africa. He also worked with some Formula 1 racing company on such systems, as he has designed and made a few ignitions for them; and he built and raced several racing cars (though not F1 cars).

    He has suggested that I use a Lexus 4 litre engine for my P-51 project. The '98 onwards models have an output of 290HP in stock format and I was looking for a 300HP engine so this works well.

    Here is the interesting bit- he further suggested that I purchase a used engine and re-build it because (a) its cheaper and (b) the engine has been de-stressed, and if it runs smoothly after the 60,000 or so km that it has done so far then you can be sure that you have an engine that isn't concealing some hidden defect.

    All of this seems to come from racing engine know-how (as they say); when a new engine is made for a race car they would take the engine, re-sleeve it and then toss the block out into the open for a year. After this they machine it and put the head on and race it. The year out de-stresses the metal apparantly.

    The conventional wisdom says that one should use a new engine, but what my mate said above made sense to me.

    Therefore maybe you should buy a second-hand engine and re-build it; there will certainly not be any questions from the second hand sellers. Or buy an engine from someone here in SA- here they don't care what you do with the enigne as long as you buy it! :p:

    Oddball
     

Share This Page



arrow_white