Torch Welding Aluminum: Is this for real???

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Aerowerx

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This web site claims that you can "weld" aluminum with their Super Alloy 5 rods and a propane torch. And the strength of the joint is "weld strength"---30,000 psi.

I'm skeptical. Until proven otherwise I would not want to use this on a critical aircraft part. Or maybe do some destructive testing before committing to your welded aluminum engine mount, perhaps?

[Edit] Just noticed that for "thick" aluminum they recommend a oxyacetylene torch. But what do they mean by "thick"?
 

Aerowerx

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That's what I thought. Welding actually melts part of the base material.

They claim 30000 psi, but is that just the rod material or the entire joint?
 

akwrencher

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I had some Alumiweld back in the 90's. It worked, but as stated is NOT structural. Handy for a few things but over priced, at least at the time. Haven't checked lately.
 

Aerowerx

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Can Propane, butane, or MAPP with oxygen get hot enough to weld aluminum? It certainly would be a lot cheaper than a full Oxyacetylene or TIG set up.
 

revkev6

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Can Propane, butane, or MAPP with oxygen get hot enough to weld aluminum? It certainly would be a lot cheaper than a full Oxyacetylene or TIG set up.

no... aluminum is very particular to weld. gas welding aluminum is an art... tig welding aluminum well is also an art.... lots to learn.


btw, on the subject of brazing. there was a brazing rod used for steel tube that was extremely strong, many british race cars and bicycles utilized it... pretty popular
 

Dana

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Can Propane, butane, or MAPP with oxygen get hot enough to weld aluminum? It certainly would be a lot cheaper than a full Oxyacetylene or TIG set up.

If you're talking about those Bernz-O-Matic propane/oxygen welding setups using the standard propane or MAPP cylinder and the same size oxygen cylinder, don't waste your money. The tiny oxygen bottles last about a minute, and the unregulated setup means the oxygen pressure is constantly dropping as you use it.

Dana
 

NoStealth

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Can Propane, butane, or MAPP with oxygen get hot enough to weld aluminum? It certainly would be a lot cheaper than a full Oxyacetylene or TIG set up.

Yes, but less common. Only tried OxyAcet gas myself:
Kent White, The Tinman
OxyAcet Al welding is different and stuff to learn while blowing holes.
Good flux and glasses help. Experienced welders seem to pick it up quickly.
Kent White used to put on great metal demos at Osh. You also could try Tig&Mig? with the welding vendor booths at Osh.

Some of those fluxless Aluminum braze (solder) rods were stronger than the base Aluminum, but some good looking joints would fail badly. The separate flux might help..
 

Brian Clayton

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The benefit of using H2 is that the flame is much cooler than acetylene.


BJC

4000f vs 6000f, so its closer to the melting point of alum. You do have to use flux though. Gas welding doesnt leave as hard of a weld joint either.

I use the "aluminum brazing" rods on occasion. The only real use I have found for them is pot metal repair though. Very low temp. Its more like soldering than welding. You tin the surface first, then do your build up (or weld if thats what you want to call it) Not strong though, reminds me of silver solder on steel.
 

BJC

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4000f vs 6000f, so its closer to the melting point of alum. You do have to use flux though. Gas welding doesnt leave as hard of a weld joint either.

I use the "aluminum brazing" rods on occasion. The only real use I have found for them is pot metal repair though. Very low temp. Its more like soldering than welding. You tin the surface first, then do your build up (or weld if thats what you want to call it) Not strong though, reminds me of silver solder on steel.

Yup, the H2 flame is only 69% the temperature of the acetylene flame. Makes it easier to control the metal temperature.


BJC
 

dcstrng

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I use the "aluminum brazing" rods on occasion. The only real use I have found for them is pot metal repair though...

Brian; have you thought if there was a place to use them in A/C, if I may ask… I’ve played with the Alumi-Weld and clones and it’s fun to “weld” the bottom of soda-cans and the like, but not sure where to use it in an A/C

Once thought about riveting up a fuel tank and then using the material to seal the seams instead of ProSeal or similar – but was talked out of that… tried it with a small pewter picture frame, but wasn’t happy with the results (probably all my thumbs getting in the way…)
 

TFF

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The only time I have wanted to try it is to put together an aluminum RC airplane frame duplicating a 4130 one. Just have not gotten to it. It would be great if it would stay together.
 
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