Tool Guide For Your Aircraft

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Rhino

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
771
Location
SW Ohio
You may have seen this before, but I love this tool guide from AVweb:

HAMMER:
Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer is used as a kind of divining rod to locate expensive parts not far from the object we are trying to hit.

ELECTRIC DRILL:
Normally used for spinning rivets in their holes until you die of old age, but it also works well for drilling mounting holes just above a fuel line.

PLIERS:
Used to round off bolt heads.

HACKSAW:
One of a family of cutting tools based on the chaos principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS:
Used to round off bolt heads if nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH:
Used almost entirely for lighting various flammable objects in your hangar on fire.

WHITWORTH (Metric) SOCKETS:
Once used for working on older British engines and airplanes, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16-inch or 1/2-inch socket for which you've been searching the last 15 minutes.

DRILL PRESS:
A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the chest and flings your drink across the room, splattering it against that freshly painted aircraft part you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL:
Cleans rust off old bolts and then throws the bolt somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprint whorls and hard-earned guitar calluses in about the time it takes you to say, "Ouch!"

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK:
Used for lowering an airplane to the ground after you have installed your new tires, trapping the jack handle firmly under the landing gear leg.

EIGHT-FOOT-LONG DOUGLAS FIR 2x4:
Used for levering an airplane upward off a hydraulic jack.

TWEEZERS:
A tool for removing wood splinters.

TELEPHONE:
Tool for calling your neighbor to see if he has another hydraulic floor jack.

TROUBLE LIGHT:
The mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes called drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine vitamin," which is not otherwise found under airplanes at night. Health benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at about the same rate that 105-mm howitzer shells might be used during, say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER:
Normally used to stab the lids of old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splash oil on your shirt; can also be used, as the name implies, to round off Phillips screw heads.

AIR COMPRESSOR:
A machine that takes energy produced in a coal-burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into compressed air that travels by hose to a pneumatic impact wrench that grips rusty bolts last tightened 60 years ago, and rounds them off.

PRY BAR:
A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding the clip or bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50-cent part.

HOSE CUTTER:
A tool used to cut hoses 1/2-inch too short.
 

wally

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2004
Messages
926
Location
southwest TN.
Yep at one time or another I have used all the listed tools with the listed results.

I am getting better tho. I don't (very often) pick up my hot Vice Grips. I usually stumble around in the semi-dark trying to get my goggles off, and reach over and steady myself by grabbing the bench vice I have the part I just welded clamped in.

I remember not too long ago using my table saw when, whooop, faster than I could believe, got thumped seriously hard in the stomach.

I tangled with gyroscopic precession once too. I was using a 4 inch electric angle grinder and as I let it swing down by my side still spinning, it twisted in my hand. I met the nicest med student at the ER that evening as she installed several sutures in my finger.

Y'all be carefull, hear?
Wally
 

Falco Rob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
185
Location
Perth, Western Australia
I have a home built bench saw with a 2kW (about 3hp) motor and a wicked looking 10" blade that spins at 2800rpm. It would take a hand off at the wrist before you felt any pain - it scares the hell out of me every time I use it.

I also have a band saw which is less frightening, but I'm also wary of losing a body part each time I turn it on.

. . and finally I have a hand held jig saw, which is one of my best friends, gets used absolutely every day and is really quite cute.

. . . guess which of the above put me in casualty at 10.30pm one night getting 6 sutures in my finger.

Never get complacent with power tools, even the cute ones.
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Hammers and Drills

I find the little metal bending hammer most excellent for finding the tip of my thumb. Did it again this evening!

And drill bits works wonders on youur hand when you are "free-handing" an extra little hole someplace.

Years ago, I lost the tip of my right bird finger to the table saw -Falco Rob is correct saying you lose the part before you feel the pain!

Needless to say, except for the hammer, I exercise a lot more caution nowadays.
 

Othman

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2004
Messages
355
Location
Ottawa, ON, Canada
Looks like this post is good therapy for builders... let the healing begin :)

I would like to add the table mounted disc grinder to the list. Great for quickly grinding down metal (or wood) parts to the pen line... but like the other tools, your parts can get away on you sometimes. Especially if you're working the end of a tube against the disc with the "free hand" technique (holding the part in your hand and pressing it against the wheel).

Play safe.
 

dustind

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2004
Messages
146
Location
Saint Michael, Minnesota
I nearly lost my left hand yesterday to a CNC grinder. My hand was crushed when the machine moved back as I was trying to fish something out from behind it. My hand seems fine but it looks like I will have mild permanent nerve damage in my thumb, index, middle, and pointer fingers. I am truly lucky to be alive so I am not complaining.

I have bent finger and tow nails up by having them a bit too long or by not wearing gloves.

I have had to work bits of metal out from under my eye lids after doing a quick bit of grinding with my dremel tool. It was just a few second, why bother with safety glasses? :rolleyes:

In every injury of my life the pain did not come until after the damage was done. Usually a bit after.
 

orion

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 2, 2003
Messages
5,800
Location
Western Washington
OK since we're sharing - how about giving an air compressor a hand in starting when the starting capacitor goes out. This is of course done by carefuly grabbing the V-belt and pulling so the motor has a chance to get up to speed.

Of course then you have to get your hand out of the way quickly, which I didn't, nearly losing a third off my middle finger when it got nearly squeezed off as it went around the pulley. Here however the pain was almost immediate - imediately after I also did a fairly adequate representation of a classic rain dance.
 

wally

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2004
Messages
926
Location
southwest TN.
Glad I've never done that! Oh, wait, I used to have an old metal lathe... at least it never bit me doing that - that I remember anyway.
Wally
 

Falco Rob

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
185
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Is it just me, or can anyone else see a pattern emerging here?

You take a bunch of reasonably intelligent people (well, with enough smarts to build and/or design an aeroplane) and whenever they get near a sharp implement or power tool their IQ drops to single digits.

This could keep some nerdy Phd psychology student entranced for years.
 

Dieselfume

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 30, 2004
Messages
100
Location
S36 Kent, WA
Geeze, funny you should mention. I had some professors that DEFINITELY shouldn't be near any power tools. One thing I didn't like about the engineering curriculum at WSU was that it didn't include enough hands on in the shop making stuff. (although I suspect we got more than average). I saw too many engineers graduate that didn't have a good knowledge of the nuts and bolts of getting something to work. I think Rutan said you shouldn't be designing it if you don't know how to build it (yourself). (ok, rant off)

I had a drill press like Orion's air compressor. Except spinning it up wasn't so dangerous and I have all my digits. We all do stupid crap once in a while. I had a table mounted belt sander teach my knuckles a good lesson once. I also have a good buddy that "accidently" stabbed me in the knee. Boy, that ammunition is good for years, he'll never hear the end of that one :gig:
 

pylon500

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
270
Location
Taree Airport Australia
One of my favorite tools is a 'wafer cutter' in a pnuematic die grinder. :D
Although I now tend to blame this tool for my partial deafness, I've always found it to be a great tool for both course and fine jobs.
The cutters I use are stamped OK up to 22,000rpm, and my grinder can usually get about 18,000rpm.
Now working at home without air, I've started using an electric router unit with a variable speed.
The other day while cutting the flash off a glass part, I was having trouble keeping up rpm, so I wound up the controller and continued for about three seconds, followed by a very loud BANG. :eek:
The photo shows the end result... OUCH!
In twenty years of using these things, I've never had one explode before. :confused:
Arthur.
 

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Rhino

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
771
Location
SW Ohio
****! I've never seen a grinder cause that much hair growth before! :ban:
 

Falco Rob

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Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
185
Location
Perth, Western Australia
Hmmm . . most people would have run for the Bandaids.

Arthur collects all the bits of the cutter, assembles them in a neat little pattern and takes a photo of the whole disaster . . . . what was that I was saying about single digit IQ's.




Just kidding Arthur ! :gig:
 

Craig

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 30, 2003
Messages
543
Location
Jupiter, Florida
Bandaids?

Who uses Bandaids? I keep two first aid kits in the hanger, and can never find either!

Macho men like me spill some MEK onto a shop towel, paper or cloth, wrap it around the area til it stops bleeding - or you stop screaming from the MEK - then go on and do the work.

Duct tape works well, too.

Single digits, huh? Would you believe negative numbers?

Merry Christmas to all - and stay away from the sticky red stuff in the coming New Year!
 

Midniteoyl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2003
Messages
2,406
Location
Indiana
OK since we're sharing - how about giving an air compressor a hand in starting when the starting capacitor goes out. This is of course done by carefuly grabbing the V-belt and pulling so the motor has a chance to get up to speed.
Not quite the same, but I have grabbed the belt after the head unit seized in an effort to rotate it it.

Who knew that 'smoke' means 'hot'?
 

Rhino

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2004
Messages
771
Location
SW Ohio
Another version of the same theme:

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching
flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the
chest and flings your beer across the room, splattering it against that
freshly stained heirloom piece you were drying.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere
under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints
and hard-earned guitar calluses from fingers in about the time it takes
you to say, "YEOWW S...."

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their
holes until you die of old age.

SKIL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation
of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor
touchup jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board
principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable
motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more
dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt
heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer
intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

WELDING GLOVES: Heavy duty leather gloves used to prolong the
conduction of intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various
flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the
grease inside the wheel hub you want the bearing race out of.

WHITWORTH SOCKETS: Once used for working on older British cars and
motorcycles, they are now used mainly for impersonating that 9/16 or
1/2 inch socket you've been searching for the last 45 minutes.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch
wood projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground
after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack handle
firmly under the bumper.

EIGHT-FOOT LONG YELLOW PINE 2X4: Used for levering an automobile
upward off of a trapped hydraulic jack handle.

TWEEZERS: A tool for removing wood splinters and wire wheel wires.

E-Z OUT BOLT AND STUD EXTRACTOR: A tool ten times harder than any
known drill bit that snaps neatly off in bolt holes thereby ending any
possible future use.

RADIAL ARM SAW: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most
shops to scare neophytes into choosing another line of work.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the maximum tensile
strength of everything you forgot to disconnect.

CRAFTSMAN 1/2 x 24-INCH SCREWDRIVER: A very large pry bar that
inexplicably has an accurately machined screwdriver tip on the end
opposite the handle.

AVIATION METAL SNIPS: See hacksaw.

TROUBLE LIGHT: The home mechanic's own tanning booth. Sometimes
called a drop light, it is a good source of vitamin D, "the sunshine
vitamin," which is not otherwise found under cars at night. Health
benefits aside, its main purpose is to consume 40-watt light bulbs at
about the same rate that 105 mm howitzer shells might be used during,
say, the first few hours of the Battle of the Bulge. More often dark than light, its name is somewhat misleading.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under
lids and for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil
on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out
Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used
to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws.

AIR COMPRESSOR: A machine that takes energy produced in a
coal-burning power plant 200 miles away and transforms it into
compressed air that travels by hose to a Chicago Pneumatic impact
wrench that grips rusty bolts which were last over tightened 30 years
ago by someone at Ford, and instantly rounds off their heads. Also used to quickly snap off lug nuts.

PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or
bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays
is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts
adjacent the object we are trying to hit. Some primarily use it to make
gaping holes in walls when hanging pictures.

MECHANIC'S KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of
cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly well
on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic bottles,
collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic parts.
Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in use.

DAMMIT TOOL: Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the
garage while yelling "DAMMIT" at the top of your lungs. It is also,
most often, the next tool that you will need.
 

RonL

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jan 9, 2007
Messages
466
Location
Texas
What a rude awakening, if that had been a test i would have scored a perfect 100

RonL
 
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