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mcrae0104

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Just to bring this back to aviation....

In a forced landing on a highway, would you land:

a) in the left lane, provided you are faster than the traffic in the right lane (low aspect ratio plane assumed), or
b) on top of a slow-moving semi trailer (a la Eric Tucker or other airshow performers), regardless of lane, or
c) against the traffic on the other side of the highway, or
d) whichever direction gets your E/VTOL pointed to the nearest Tesla supercharging station?
 

Dana

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“Fill Her Up”


On an early spring Saturday in 1975, professional aerobatic and movie pilot J.W. “Corkey” Fornof was flying a Bede BD-5J, a tiny, single-seat microjet, to a NASA gathering of space shuttle subcontractors in Washington, D.C., where the airplane was to be displayed. Level at 11,500 feet over North Carolina, Fornof suddenly lost all oil pressure on the watermelon-size French TRS-18 turbojet that powered the airplane. He shut down the engine and glided toward the solid cloud layer below him—a spunky move, since he couldn’t be sure what was below it.


Fortunately, Fornof broke out of the undercast about 800 feet above a thick pine forest, saw Interstate 95 several miles to the west and was able to line up with the highway for a landing. He skimmed over a Mayflower moving van and briefly considered landing atop it, since traffic was heavy, “but I had a Road Runner cartoon vision of coming to an overpass and figured that wasn’t a good idea,” he recalled. Fornof still had plenty of speed, and he remembers gliding past a Cadillac—“they waved at me”—and coming up behind a pickup towing a boat. “I came up abeam the driver and motioned that I wanted to slide in ahead of them, and the guy simply slowed down and motioned me past. I don’t know what he was smokin’, but he was cool as could be.”


Fornof touched down gently, crested a hill and rolled down the other side to an off-ramp. At the bottom of the exit was a mini-mall and a Sunoco gas station, so Fornof used the last of the Bede’s momentum to roll up to the pump island, activating the little rubber ding-ding hose in the process. The station attendant was leaning against the doorway, and, said Fornof, “We stared at each other a good 15 seconds, and he spit out his chaw and said, ‘Is this Candid Camera?’”


Corkey flew a BD-5J in the James Bond film Octopussy, in which his most spectacular stunt was flying the microjet through a hangar—in one door and out the other end—but the highway landing experience was also worked into the plot: Bond (Roger Moore) runs out of fuel in the Bede, lands on a rural two-lane and rolls into a gas station, where he tells the slack-jawed attendant to “Fill her up, please.”

(from The 10 Greatest Emergency Landings)
 

Pops

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Friend of mine was flying cross country in NE Nebraska in a C-85 powered Baby Ace, getting dark, not enough fuel to make it to the next airport. Saw one of those long East/West gravel roads, landed and taxied to a farm, up the driveway to the barn. Farmer and his wife came out and invited him to spend the night and fed him good and filled his fuel tank. Next morning took off on the gravel road continued his trip back east.
 

blane.c

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Friend of mine was flying cross country in NE Nebraska in a C-85 powered Baby Ace, getting dark, not enough fuel to make it to the next airport. Saw one of those long East/West gravel roads, landed and taxied to a farm, up the driveway to the barn. Farmer and his wife came out and invited him to spend the night and fed him good and filled his fuel tank. Next morning took off on the gravel road continued his trip back east.

Those engines would run on 80/87, remember 80/87?
 

Pops

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Those engines would run on 80/87, remember 80/87?
Sure do. I remember before 100LL. Use to fly all day visiting airports in WV, Ohio, Ky, Tenn and paying for a fill-up with pocket change. Auto fuel was 17-24 cents a gallon. 80/87 wasn't much more, but don't remember exactly, think maybe 30 cents. Remember when KCRW first got radar. Before transponders, had to do a identifying turn when calling the tower. You flew the new heading until tower told you they have you identified. One time the tower forgot to tell me and I was almost out of range still flying that heading and inquired if they ever found me. With my Alpha 200 radio, I could talk to tower about the time it was in site. I still have my Alpha 200 and my Narco coffee grinder radio.
 

jedi

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I see this thread has slid to page 4 in the Hangar Flying section. I am giving it a relight due to recent Hangar Flying posts concerning Covid shots and FAA medical issues.

Several posts in that thread were deleted because they were "off topic" on the political side. Having been active on another thread that wandered considerably I was compelled to post a "like" when the monitor deleted numerous posts.

Reading further down the thread I soon felt guilty for issuing the "like" when I had not had a chance to read the deleted posts. I also noted that several participants commented that their posts were unfairly targeted. I would like to suggest that monitors consider moving posts to this thread prior to deletion when things get too off topic. I would also like to suggest that members voluntarily self monitor and post here when their messages start to stray.

I admit to having a bias towards this thread having suggested the topic. In reviewing the contents I found post #85 above well worth a read.

I think it is best to leave it at that for now.
 
Last edited:

Derswede

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Pops, many years ago (I was a kid then, getting ready to retire now), a friend was flying his C-3 Aeronca to Oshkosh, told me this tale. Got into a bit of weather, major headwind, and knew he was in trouble when he said he saw horses going faster than the plane. Running low on fuel, he started looking for an airport, then realized that he was not going to get to one. Finally, about out of fuel, he made a slow decent over a large farm. Losing ground at this point, he finally got into the lee side of the large barn there and as he said, did a vertical landing. Farmer had watched the whole thing in awe. Came out, offered to let him put the C-3 into the barn. Next morning, fueled it up from the farm tank and finished his trip. Farmer kept saying, "I Never saw an airplane flying backwards before!" The fun you can have with slow, light airplanes!

Derswede
 

Derswede

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The original ultralight! Steer by sticking your hand out into the slipstream....not that it was going by that fast....! Never got the chance to fly one, also wish I had. At a fly-in down at the old "Wings and Wheels" museum which used to be at Santee/Cooper in South Carolina, an announcer breathlessly told the audience to prepare for a high speed flyby.... As a P-51 and another warbird had just taken off, everyone was expecting those birds. A couple of seconds later, the C-3 appeared and buzzed over the field, with the announcer making comments about the "high speed pass". A wit with the announcer commented in the background that the Model A Ford that was used for "executive transport" had just outrun the C-3. Everyone got a good laugh, and the warbirds got their pass in a couple of minutes later.

Derswede (I miss fly-ins!)
 

Pilot-34

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Pilot-34,

"Automatic transmissions are far more complicated than manual transmissions. "

Please explain.
Oops sorry I missed this.
In semi trucks they are much more complicated than in cars.
The feature that most often causes trouble is they don’t usually have a position for Park you place them in neutral and then engage the parking brake .
Another feature that can cause trouble may have been a factor in the Colorado truck crash that is some do and some don’t hold in a gear like a manual does. Some free wheel and others will automatically upshift coming down the mountain,There are also different procedures for holding a automatic transmission in gear coming down a mountain.Moreover some automatics have a built-in brake retarder or engine retarder.Some automatics can be forced up in the gears or forced down,Some can be held in gear others can’t. Summer automatics I have a torque converter built-in that acts as a variable deep reduction others do not have a torque converter and are simply computer controlled manual transmissions. Imagine that an automatic transmission but you still have to use the clutch ! Some automatics have two gears some have 20
Now add up all these features in all the different possible combinations and it gets far more complicated than a manual.
Every manual I have ever driven Can be operated the same ,double clutch and shift up before your shift down.
 

TFF

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The Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini “automatics” are computer controlled manuals. Early ones had manual clutches but now the computer does it. Solenoids instead of shifter and lever. New C8 corvette is like that too. Porsche 911 had an automatic shifted manual option in the 70s. Early 90s saw a traditional auto but in late 90s saw a return to the manual auto. Now it’s standard equipment.

I would not want to be going down hill in a semi with a regular style auto. Traditional autos have one way sprangs and freewheel. The coast is regulated by a clutch band that brakes the internals of the transmission, gears are freewheeling. Burn that band up and bad day.
 
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