The state of our (dying) sport 2022

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Dan Thomas

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Sep 17, 2008
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7,230
Most had no interest in gaining new local students because they cater to the sponsored Japanese students that travel to the U.S. to get their pilot training.
They have a reason for that. Many other cultures have a stronger work ethic than current generations of North Americans, and they know their 3 R's a lot better. I saw it in the flight school I was at for so many years. We had numerous European students that were really motivated and knew that anything they accomplished was going to take hard work. They didn't think they could buy their licenses and ratings. Those things had to be earned. It was a joy to teach them, and they didn't mess up the schedules with cancellations.

3 Rs? Reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic.
 

SpruceForest

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May 23, 2022
Messages
143
I carried Israeli, Dutch, German, and Saudi students... with that order (high to low) being how they stacked up in terms of UPT. The Israelis knew they could not get a down check on a flight without a trip home. The Dutch and Germans got two strikes before they had to pack up, and the Saudi students - all at least in some way related to the royal family - got what was an infinite number of recycles and trips back to 'language school' - which is to say a few months at the Presidio to hone their beach and surfing skills before returning to do battle with us EURO-NATO IPs.

In terms of entitlement, the order is obviously reversed. A decade ago, I had a twenty-something Israeli CFI for a flight review and instrument comp that was everything good I'd seen in my Israeli students. Think she stuck around to go to work for NetJets, in which case, they got a bargain at whatever they pay her.
 

Yellowhammer

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Feb 21, 2020
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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Let’s compare $$$ flying to fishing:

Tow vehicle
Boat/trailer
Electronics
Propulsion devices
Batteries
Storage fees
Fuel for both
Tackle/bait

Hmmm all to outsmart a critter that has a brain, how big?

Some folks figure out how to fulfill their dreams, and the others?


Mark Z,

My Fishing can cost as little as acquiring the following;


Worms: I can did them out from under a pile of leaves for free all day.

Cane Pole: I can go to any number of bamboo stands and hack down a mighty fine Brim buster.

Propulsion: Walk to the side of the pond, river, or lake and catch them from the bank.

Fishing Line: Have to head to Walmart and get some 10 pound test. $12.00

Hooks: Have to pick these up form Walmart as well. $6-12.00

LOL!

-Yellowhammer
 

Bigshu

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Jun 7, 2020
Messages
1,320
Location
KCMO, midwestern USA
Let’s compare $$$ flying to fishing:

Tow vehicle
Boat/trailer
Electronics
Propulsion devices
Batteries
Storage fees
Fuel for both
Tackle/bait

Hmmm all to outsmart a critter that has a brain, how big?

Some folks figure out how to fulfill their dreams, and the others?
Yes, but the tow vehicle can be used for other stuff than fishing trips. Im ,ost cases, so can the boat. There's no special certificate to drivr the tow vehicle or the boat, no medical beyond an eye test, The other things are a wash on cost. Fishing still wins on pure utility of the tow vehicle. It can't be about economics only, it has to be about that dream. Nobody dreams of fishing.
 

Pops

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Jan 1, 2013
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USA.
I still dream of fishing.
When I was a kid I had a stick with some fishing line wrapped around it. A small tin with a few hooks, pocket knife to cut a cane pole on the creek bank. Would walk about 3-4 miles off the ridge to 18 mile creek while carrying a burlap sack with a coupe ears of corn, couple potatoes and couple apples. Fish until dark and build a fire ( matches in a Prince Albert tobacco metal can) and roast the corn and potatoes with any fish I caught. Bed time dig a low spot in the sand on the creek bank and lay on the burlap sack and sleep. Fish and walk home the next day. Drank from the small springs up on the side of the hills. Great, fun day.
 

Yellowhammer

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772
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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
I still dream of fishing.
When I was a kid I had a stick with some fishing line wrapped around it. A small tin with a few hooks, pocket knife to cut a cane pole on the creek bank. Would walk about 3-4 miles off the ridge to 18 mile creek while carrying a burlap sack with a coupe ears of corn, couple potatoes and couple apples. Fish until dark and build a fire ( matches in a Prince Albert tobacco metal can) and roast the corn and potatoes with any fish I caught. Bed time dig a low spot in the sand on the creek bank and lay on the burlap sack and sleep. Fish and walk home the next day. Drank from the small springs up on the side of the hills. Great, fun day.


Sounds like me and my younger brother. What I would give to do it just one more time with him.

-YH
 

Tiger Tim

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Apr 26, 2013
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Location
Thunder Bay
I don’t know about you folks but I think I’m just going to keep flying and if someone shows up at the airport interested in what I’m doing I plan to be nice to them.
 

jedi

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Aug 8, 2009
Messages
3,251
Location
Sahuarita Arizona, Renton Washington, USA
I don’t know about you folks but I think I’m just going to keep flying and if someone shows up at the airport interested in what I’m doing I plan to be nice to them.
Friend of mine did that three days ago on a rare nice day when he noticed a couple at the fence watching local aircraft operations.

After a few minutes of conversation he got suspicious of their motives. Something did not feel quite right so he ask a few well directed questions.

When confronted they admitted that they were federal government employees working for the North West Region FAA pilot enforcement branch.
 

Appowner

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Mar 30, 2021
Messages
117
Location
Michigan
If you really want to thumb your nose at the game wardens back home just toss a wire hooked to a battery in the water and crank that old telephone and then get your net ready.
lol

-YH.

I prefer one or more M-80's. I like the noise and the splash. :)

My father owned a Cherokee 180 in the 60's. I could fly it and often intended to get my PPL but life intervened and I never did.

But I also flew RC models and still do. And with those I have flown WWI and II fighters of all types. Cubs, Stearmans and others. And while I keep trying, I doubt I've spent 100k. Yet! :)

I'd love to have a RV-10 or something similar. And I can afford it. But when I look at the numbers I get sticker shock. And like someone said earlier. a Porsche costs less. And I ache for another one of those too!
 

Tom DM

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Mar 31, 2022
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EBGB Grimbergen airfield (N of Brussels, Belgium)
If you want a really expensive hobby, get a horse.


BJC

Huh?

I eat that often...

I recommend any-one to visit my all-time favorite restaurant in Vilvoorde (city which aptly carries the nickname Pjeirefretters (horse-eaters in the local dialect))

Big time old school, read 1900-style, a very limited menu but unless (home-made) ice-cream as dessert is ordered, all is fresh, made there and has never seen a deepfreezer. Suggest to the chef that there is a microwave in his kitchen, will imply your life is not safe.
When your knife touches the meat, it'll glide through like butter. Either steak or entrecote are available from 200 to 400 gr. With 400 gr you will not feel hungry for the next 2 days, yet not a lot of people can finish it.


Closed for annual vacations this augustus.

For the horse-lovers there is however one mayor caveat: you will never look at a horse the same way any-more. As I like to test people, I toke a vegetarian there once... a convert existed the restaurant about 90 minutes later.

If I would know when to die, the evening before you would find me there. Life is good!
 

imamac96

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Joined
May 10, 2018
Messages
28
Location
North Texas
I’m 25, and I have a total of about 78 hours. I started flying when I was 13. I’m a lifetime EAA member. I would’ve been in that picture in the first post, but I now have a full-time job. I’ve struggled to juggle home building with flying because I enjoy both so much.

• spent about 4 years getting my PPL SEL because I kept running out of money. Making $7.25 an hour isn’t even enough to fly through the summer.
• I got insanely lucky with my instructor. $30 per hour of instruction. I pay $70 now. I fly even less than when I was in HS because I can’t afford it on a grown up budget, and I’m flying gliders now.
• the DPE my instructor usually used retired the month before I needed to take the checkride, which set me back an entire year because my flight instructor spends his winters in HI.
• I got side tracked by a Long-EZ project. Along the way, I realized I hated working with foam and fiberglass. It is also not as cost effective as aluminum. This is still the worst financial blunder of my life, and I hope nothing tops it.
• Met Burt Rutan at Oshkosh 2015, who told me my long-EZ project was an antique. It was the stake through the heart. Oh well, at least he signed my hat.
• I spent 300 hours in 9 months as a graduate student working on a CX4. This is a plane that even a grad student can afford. Hats off the mr. Thatcher.
• Looked for a used Aerovee to put on the CX4. A guy was parting his engine and had signed a deal with Sonex to not use that serial number. He offered to brush off the S/N and sell me the plate. He also wanted more for the used conn rods than it cost me to buy new ones from CB.
• Found an incredibly good deal on a wrecked Sonex. I’m seriously blessed. The Aerovee needs a full rebuild, but the entire overhaul is only $4k. Thank you, thank you, thank you. This individual made the single largest push for my ability to participate in GA than anyone else, and he’ll probably never realize this.
• I got my LSRM-A in January of 2022. Thanks, Brian. This was money well spent for once. Learned in the class that the FAA now no longer considered time spent building a plane as time towards an A&P, which no one had bothered to tell me, so I started looking for an airframe to put back in the air.
• A member of my local chapter outbid me $1k for a Sonex project and then sold it about 1 month later after not touching it. I can’t compete with scalpers.
• A very kind EAA chapter president and A&P offered me his 601XL airframe for a very reasonable price. He lost the logs before I came to pick it up, asked if I had stolen them, but then found the logs in the house while I awkwardly waited there. He forgot to include a corvair motor Mount that was promised with the sale. When I noticed and asked where it was, he told me I was a smart-a** with an attitude and told me to leave. Oh, and he took my $100 deposit. This of course all came after him telling me that a personal check would be fine before changing his mind and requiring at least half payment in cash. I think he had early stages of dementia.
• That failed sale forced me to apologize to a person I was intending to buy a corvair (recommended by WW), who actually treated me very well. I felt awful and had to apologize while explaining why I had to back out of the deal. WW has also been one of the few helpful people, and I’ve never even met the guy in real life.
• Took a real job to actually afford planes. Had to move somewhere where flying is out of my budget, and now I’m away from my CX4 project.
• Designing an LSA on the computer since I don’t have access to my machine shop (yes, that’s right, we’re capable) back home. Getting laughed at, insulted (I’m an engineer with a physics background), and lectured by people who dreamed of a 200+ mph motor glider (I can’t make this stuff up). I ordered the ASTM standards yesterday because yes, I’m dead serious about what I do.

The hobby will only die if people continue being jerks. I haven’t exactly had a great experience with the aviation community. I know there are some great people out there. My path wasn’t very straight, so take it with a grain of salt, but I’m under 50, and that was my experience in GA.

Thanks,
Connor
 
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