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The Ranger, an easily built high wing LSA runabout

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rivilee

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Been a while since I've posted but this really has caught my attention. I've got a Mitchell Wing B10 project gathering dust because I need to build a new hang cage for it but I'm getting a little old to crawl into. So, I bought the Cloudster/Simplex plans but but this just "looks" better. I like having a pusher so the beta bird or similar I should look at (Piuma?) but not finding a UL. Anyway this has really good ideas and a tractor might be fun. I either need to sell my NOS 277 or use it. And I love to build with wood or fiberglass...

For me:
1) Don't need CNC. Super nice and on my list to build a machine but I've got all the traditional tools.
2) Would rather build the tail boom. Don't want no stinkin' aluminum. Give me messy fiberglass yadda yadda. Maybe layup a fiberglass boom over a foam core and then melt the foam out or do a foam layup like a cedarstrip canoe that would leave space for the internal pushrod(s). Or the wooden tube like Duncan suggested.
3) I've got plenty of 1/8" non AC baltic birch (5x5 sheets), 16' poplar boards that would meet AC specs and also about 20 8' 1x2" pine that has super tight, straight growth rings. Looks like they would easily meet AC specs. Anyway, wish I could use some of that. Oh, I also have plenty of veneer strips for the ribs
4) The idea of arm rests is appealing. Goes along with the reclined seating well.
5) And someone asked earlier: What would it take to make the wings fully cantilevered with no struts (ala B10, Tornado, etc.)? I loved one of the first drawings where it didn't show the struts.

Anyway, Wow! This looks great! I'm planning to build one.........
 

rtfm

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Hi, and welcome to the discussion. We're all waiting for the final files to appear, but Fritz is a busy guy. Good things come to those who wait.
I have a CNC hotwire (never used it though) and am seriously considering one of the DIY CNC routers. However, once my tool envy subsides, I will probably end up cutting the stuff by hand.
 

wmax351

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Oct 10, 2018
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Ann Arbor, MI
Looks like a cool project. You should consider putting it on Grabcad, so people can follow the updates, and you can share the files as you like as well. And it also helps with version control and backup, without needing the expensive version of solidworks. I've been using it for my modeling of the Bowers Flybaby from the EAA articles and Ron wantanja's site.

Basically, I have a public model that is a step file of the whole assembly. Easy to access and download. Then I have my private library of the whole thing, with all the sub assemblies and parts, as well as other resources. I share that with read-write privileges to someone that is helping me work on it. Then I have a publically accessible read only library, which I can update from the private library, which I can link to when I share files.
 

rivilee

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Jul 22, 2014
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Middle Tennessee
Well..., I'm going to keep following this thread because this Ranger (wasn't there a Ranger UL back in the 80's?) is very cool. But..., I think I should finish what I have in the B10. However, since I need to build a new hang cage I think I want to design one that has slightly more vertical room (1"?) and easier to get in and out of with slightly more ground clearance. I had a B10 back in the 80's so I don't think I'll be totally ignorant about what I want to do. So I guess I'll start a new thread in Aircraft design?

Yes! Looking in my handy dandy "Ultralight Aircraft" book there was the Striplin Lone Ranger. Don't think it lasted very long....
 

rtfm

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The biggest piece is 83" long and the side skins are 1/8". It could fit on a 4'x4' machine if it was split it into two pieces. It would require another doubler like the split between the top and bottom side skins. Another way to do it on a 4'x4' (or a 4'x6') machine would be to cut one end of the sheet, move the sheet 4' and cut the other end. That works but the table can't have rails sticking up on the ends (most don't) and you need to be able to index the sheet very accurately when you move it. The next longest parts are the spar webs at about 46".
Hi,
I have been scouring the Interweb looking for affordable CNC routers, and have found the "Lowrider". It can handle full 4x8 sheets, and looks like a winner. Also quite inexpensive.
Does anyone have any 1st or even 2nd hand experience of this machine?

https://www.v1engineering.com/lowrider-cnc/

Duncan
 

FritzW

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Yikes! That's cutting it close, Maybe we do need to add a few inches to the nose.

I fired up the CAD computer as soon as I got home from church. I even skipped out on the potluck, which (as you can tell) is a big deal for me. ;)

I have played with the 'wood tail' version a little. I'll post some stuff as soon as I stretch the nose and see what that does to the CG.

...how do we post images in this newfangled system? All I get is those little thumbnails at the bottom.

Even If I straighten my legs they wouldn't get in the prop. Are you sure all your measurements are correct?
 

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Hot Wings

Grumpy Cynic
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...how do we post images in this newfangled system? All I get is those little thumbnails at the bottom.
Still learning myself. After you drag-n-drop the file there is a thumbnail/full size selection showing on top of the dragged thumbnail. Clicking one of those inserts the pic, either thumb or full, into the post body.

Edit: still trying to figure out how to find our old pictures so that they can be reused. Seems that would have less of an impact on data storage than constantly uploading the same picture?
 
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lr27

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The 4"x.049 boom is right off the 640 pound GW, 6G, Hovey Beta Bird.

What size was the tail boom on Hall's IBEX? It looks like it was about twice as long as the one the Ranger. The empty weight of the IBEX is 30 pounds more than the Ranger's max GW. The IBEX had a full flying V tail that caused the flutter problem. He shortened the V tail and moved the counter weights to fix the flutter problem but kept the same tail boom.

...but this is the internet, so comparing apples to oranges to make an invalid point is totally okay.
Not sure how relevant the IBEX was if it had a different length tailboom. Being a sailplane, I suspect the Ibex had a higher Vne than the Ranger would. Plus of course the tail would be different.

Nevertheless, Stan Hall wrote, in the September 1974 Soaring, that the boom was 5 inch diameter, .063 wall 6061-T6 tube, with the forward half reinforced by 4 inch diameter, .095 inch wall 2024-T4 mounted in rings. (Doesn't sound all that efficient, structurally, to me.) Much more on the Ibex here, including a drawing you could probably scale from:
https://scalesoaring.co.uk/the-ibex-docs/
Note that Vne was supposed to be 140 mph, but flutter was encountered on tow. Supposedly the flutter was fixed with different balance weights, but Hall wrote that he didn't really trust it after that. Apparently, according to Hall, the flutter was the result of coupling between torsion and bending. Presumably a conventional tail would have a smaller moment of inertia in the torsional direction.
 

lr27

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snip (save the electrons, there are only 10^80 left!)

BTW, once you start talking about significant modifications to an existing tube, wouldn't it be about as easy to make up your own tube, tapered, with stiffness where you need it and not where you don't? You'd only need a 1/2 mold, I think. I seem to recall the Carbon Dragon was done this way, though I expect a somewhat stiffer and stronger boom would be needed for the Ranger. A carbon boom could be made larger diameter, since the stuff is less dense, which would make a big difference in stiffness and strength. Toward the aft end of the boom, where the diameter is smaller, some extra +/-45 degree layers could be added to maintain torsional stiffness.
 

FritzW

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...Much more on the Ibex here, including a drawing you could probably scale from:...
I think you missed the whole point of my post. I was saying the Ranger boom has nothing to do with the IBEX boom. ...they're apples and oranges
 

Victor Bravo

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A lot of things could be more efficient, but I believe it is obvious that one of Fritz' primary goals with this was to use commonly available materials and parts as much as he could. A custom composite tailcone or tube would not be in keeping with that.
 
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