The Pipe Cub according to "The History Guy"

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

DanH

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 20, 2019
Messages
136
I had a '45 L-4. A friend offered to obtain the Army Air Corps aircraft record card for me. The USAF keeps 'em at Maxwell AFB.

The card is a series of dated entries, as well as contract numbers, serial numbers, etc. The dates start with the contract, and flow through production, inspection, acceptance, delivery, and every unit assignment until it's scrapped.

Ok, this one came off the assembly line at Lock Haven six days after VJ Day. Sat around a few days getting through the acceptance process, but was eventually assigned to Ft Bragg, NC.

Here the fun starts. There was an entry for the day it was picked up in Lock Haven by an Army ferry pilot. The next entry is dated two weeks later, by a clerk at Ft Bragg. It simply says "Aircraft overdue". The following entry, dated a few days after, just says "Aircraft arrived".

Ok, picture this. The war is over. A young man in uniform is welcome everywhere. This particular young man has a brand new Cub. No one in the Army much gives a **** about anything except getting discharged. It's only 425 miles. So where he go for more than two weeks?

Makes me grin...
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
11,007
Location
USA.
Cub trivia----
A man named Paul Bray Jr started ferrying Cubs from the factory at Lockhaven, Pa. to all over north and south America when he was 16 years old. Spare fuel in a can and bag of extra clothes strapped in the front seat.
His family Studios also made training films for the Military and the FAA. Paul was current in most of anything the AF has.
Have flown with him in his Piper Twin Comanche. Great pilot.



 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
17,353
Location
Memphis, TN
You are assuming they have bullets or the gun fitted. It wasn’t like the the war was going that good for the Germans at that point. That it happened is all that matters.
 

bifft

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 17, 2011
Messages
385
Location
Utah
History man states the the Cub-crew took the German pilot and observer prisoner.

In order to do so the Fi156 must be first on the ground and then the Cub lands... into the prolonged barrel-line of a machinegun.

Toward the end of the war everybody in Germany was headed west to surrender to American/British forces instead of Soviet. So they may have been on a mission to find somebody to surrender to.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BJC

Tom DM

Well-Known Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2022
Messages
280
Location
EBGB Grimbergen airfield (N of Brussels, Belgium)
The story is covered under several slightly different versions but as names/ dates are mentioned it is probably true.
It seems the Fi156 was shot down by the Piper-crew and that is was the only aerial combat of WOII fought with pistols.

Meteo permitting I will get my first taste of Piper Cub since several decades next week , so bring it on :)
 
Top