The new BMW "Baby Six" diesel engine.

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Detego

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The BMW introduced a new 3 cylinder, 1.5L all aluminum diesel engine.


Looks and sounds perfect.
My guess is you will not find this Engine Imported into the STATES; the rule is the British burn, high priced Diesel; while the STATES burn, high priced Gasoline. :devious:
 
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Is it the enigne that some of us have been waiting for?


As much as I like BMW engines I'd have to say no, it's not. That kind of depends on the weight but twin cams and balance shafts aren't the stuff of which light weight motors are made. Unfortunately I think we are going to see far fewer automotive engines that are candidates for aircraft conversion as the manufacturers go to complex systems like variable valve timing and turbos in an attempt to get good performance over a broad RPM range for use with transmissions with discrete ratios. If there is ever a wholesale change to CVT's or hybrid systems then maybe we'll begin to see simpler configurations optimized to run at a narrow RPM range.
 

Kristoffon

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Unfortunately I think we are going to see far fewer automotive engines that are candidates for aircraft conversion as the manufacturers go to complex systems like variable valve timing and turbos in an attempt to get good performance over a broad RPM range for use with transmissions with discrete ratios.

While that is true OTOH the specific power has been going up so I think it balances out favourably.

For instance, while a few years ago one might replace a 220 hp IO-360 with a 220 hp Subaru EG-33, today we could choose between the EZ30D with 220 hp or the EZ40D with 245 hp which is an improvement, IMHO, giving the choice between more power or a slightly lighter engine. Not to mention the EZ36D with 260hp.
 

autoreply

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As much as I like BMW engines I'd have to say no, it's not. That kind of depends on the weight but twin cams and balance shafts aren't the stuff of which light weight motors are made. Unfortunately I think we are going to see far fewer automotive engines that are candidates for aircraft conversion as the manufacturers go to complex systems like variable valve timing and turbos in an attempt to get good performance over a broad RPM range for use with transmissions with discrete ratios. If there is ever a wholesale change to CVT's or hybrid systems then maybe we'll begin to see simpler configurations optimized to run at a narrow RPM range.
I don't think it's those (mechanical) systems. It's the electronics that come with it. Try operating a BMW bike or car without something silly like a parking sensor or a jiffy sensor. Will not work, period. On top of that, all those systems are proprietary, so "hacking" them isn't a simple or quick task either. The marine engines might be a more interesting option, since those are designed to be customizable. (Smart-engine for starters, as most VW diesels) Simply swapping out the turbo for a higher capacity one and adapting the ECU system might make for a fairly straightforward conversion that's weightwise not that much heavier as an typical turbocharged aircraft engine.
 

Himat

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I don't think it's those (mechanical) systems. It's the electronics that come with it. Try operating a BMW bike or car without something silly like a parking sensor or a jiffy sensor. Will not work, period. On top of that, all those systems are proprietary, so "hacking" them isn't a simple or quick task either. The marine engines might be a more interesting option, since those are designed to be customizable. (Smart-engine for starters, as most VW diesels) Simply swapping out the turbo for a higher capacity one and adapting the ECU system might make for a fairly straightforward conversion that's weightwise not that much heavier as an typical turbocharged aircraft engine.

Still there are ways to "hack" the systems. The level of difficulties depends on what engine that is to be "hacked".
The simple and easy hack on a normal aspired petrol engine is to bin the injection system and fit a carburettor on a suitable manifold. Quite a few English kit car manufacturers did this I think. The pilot’s can then have all the hassle with carburettor heat and manual leaning as with a “proper” aircraft engine:).

Second option suited for normally aspired and turbocharged petrol engines is to swap the OEM injection system with an aftermarket unit. This has been discussed on this forum before with links to different vendors.

In principle the second option can be adapted to turbo diesel engines. More difficult as the injection timing also is the ignition timing. If the hardware for this exists I do not know.

Last, with all kind of software pirated, I do see the possibility of using the OEM engine electronic loaded with a special “aircraft engine” software and maybe firmware.
 
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I don't think it's those (mechanical) systems. It's the electronics that come with it. <<<>>> all those systems are proprietary, so "hacking" them isn't a simple or quick task either.

Electronics don't weigh much. The mechanical bits attached to the end of the wires making things wiggle do. Maybe because I spent a good number of years working with electronic process controls my perception is a bit different but the electronic part of the conversion process, while not trivial, shouldn't be that much of a problem. I'd not spend any time trying to hack the OEM electronics. Design and build your own from scratch. The software for an aircraft constant speed version shouldn't be nearly as complex as "drive-ability" and interaction with the rest of the drive train isn't a major concern. The interface from digital to/from the various sensors and actuators, other then drivers for Pizeo injectors, should also be pretty much routine.

While that is true OTOH the specific power has been going up so I think it balances out favourably.

So far that does seem to be true. It's just too bad there isn't a light weight industrial engine that has been developed to the same degree as automobile engines.
 

Richard6

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So far that does seem to be true. It's just too bad there isn't a light weight industrial engine that has been developed to the same degree as automobile engines.

Coming soon to a lawn mower dealer near you.

This summer I repaired a guys lawn mower that had a overhead cam in it. Honda I think.

What ? OHC in a lawn mower ?

Richard
 
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