The Lone Ranger - a Ranger/SD-1/Aeromax based design

Discussion in 'Aircraft Design / Aerodynamics / New Technology' started by rtfm, Aug 6, 2019.

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  1. Aug 6, 2019 #1

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi,
    I got really excited with Fritz' Ranger design, and when he provided the DXF file for the cabin structure, I thought I'd landed in builder heaven. A mostly CNC routed airframe - what could be better? I had found a sub-$500 full-sheet CNC router called the Lowrider2, and ordered it. I also had an Ender3 3D printer, so I could print all the parts.

    Long story short, I had a CNC router, and the DXF files for the cabin. And then, the source of DXF files seemed to dry up. I waited, but nothing more arrived from the inspired pen of Fritz. So I decided to roll my own.

    I already had the Aeromax wings and tail feathers. I've been a long admirer of the SD-1 as far as construction methods are concerned. And, of course, a great admirer of the Ranger. So this is what I came up with:


    The "wood" parts you see are 3mm Birch ply. This forms the perfect template for the 19mm square Spruce doublers. Bonded with T88. Once the spruce/ply has been bonded, 1.5mm ply is bonded to the outside. The SD-1 is built this way (without the CNC cut ply "template") and is incredibly rigid and light.

    The profile is pure Aeromax, of course (especially the nose section), with touches of Ranger.

    Like the Aeromax and the Ranger, the fuse is extremely narrow - actually 216mm wide. The tail section tapers down to 114mm

    The tail feathers are actually Aeromax parts.

    I hope to begin cutting the plywood for the fuse and tail section next weekend.

    Regards,
    Duncan
     
    Pops and Battler Britton like this.
  2. Aug 6, 2019 #2

    litespeed

    litespeed

    litespeed

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    Hey Duncan,

    Does this mean you are going to build this and save the big bucks for the fuselage kit from Aeromax?

    We will not believe you unless we see photos !

    Any pics on the cnc and opinions?

    Cheers Phil
     
  3. Aug 6, 2019 #3

    FritzW

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    LOL, *pretty much all the files you need to build the Ranger are posted on the Open Source airplane group. Maybe you missed my build log?

    *there are some files that are still just DXF and haven't had tool paths added to them yet (a very quick process that's more than likely specific to your CNC machine anyway)

    I like what you've done with the Lone Ranger but don't confuse "lack of DXF files" with "not knowing what to do with the existing DXF's" ;)
     
  4. Aug 6, 2019 #4

    FritzW

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    WOW! I guess I didn't read your post close enough. I'm very impressed!

    Over a period of about 6 weeks you we're able to get and setup setup an Ender3 3D printer, get it dialed in and learn how to use it well enough to print out all the parts (100+ hours of print time) for a Lowrider2 CNC machine. ...then print and build an entire Lowrider2 CNC machine, get it working, get it dialed in and calibrated, AND learn how to use it well enough to cut out a fairly complex airplane. ...all in only a few weeks. It took me that long just to sort out the "cleco hole" situation. You obviously had that sorted out or you wouldn't have been ready to cut out parts.

    Too bad you didn't have a chance to take a single photograph.
     
  5. Aug 6, 2019 #5

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi Fritz,
    To be honest, I didn't give photos a thought. I'm away for the next week and a bit, but when I get back, I'll grab the phone and take some pics.
    Hi Phil,
    That's the plan.
     
  6. Aug 6, 2019 #6

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi,
    Yes, seems I completely missed the reference to the Open Source airplane group. I thought the files were just a long time in coming. Makes me feel a little silly now...

    Duncan
     
  7. Aug 6, 2019 #7

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Duncan is that the actual wing airfoil for the Aero-Max wing? Seems like it's an airfoil for a much faster airplane than what I assumed the Aero-Max is all about???? I was expecting to see a typical Ison flat bottomed wing like the Max series and Air-Bike.

    Or is this drawing for the pylon racing version of the Aero-Max :) ?
     
  8. Aug 6, 2019 #8

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    It does look a bit sharp nosed.
     
  9. Aug 7, 2019 #9

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi,
    I don't have the skills to draw the curved lines of airfoils in Sketchup. So that is a wing I found on the Web somewhere for illustration purposes.

    Regards
     
  10. Aug 9, 2019 #10

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi Fritz,
    I wasn't going to rise to your post, because I couldn't decide if it was sarcastic or just condescending. I think it is probably both. For someone with your signature line, I would have expected better. BUT, if you really were expressing admiration, then forgive the above.

    To set the record straight, I got my 3D printer on day 1, and had all the parts for the Lowrider printed by the end of day 3. Multiple parts on the bed at once, two print shifts (ie day/overnight). No calibration, no dialing in. I just imported the files into Cura, and dropped them into my Ender3. And almost no learning curve in how to use it. It's not rocket science.

    Then I set about assembling the Lowrider. That took all of one evening. Again, not rocket science. My main problem with the Lowrider was that I couldn't get the flat parts cut accurately enough. I tried three times to do it by hand, and gave up. So I farmed that out. These will arrive next week, and I can complete the assembly over the weekend.

    Most of that 6 weeks was spent at the PC drawing the LoneRanger. THAT's what took all the time (as you well know). Many iterations and changes of mind. Countless minor improvements. And re-thinks. You know how it goes. But I think I have a pretty solid working set of drawings now.

    For anyone who is considering building a Lowrider CNC router, there is a wonderful series of how-to videos by a guy called Teaching Tech - well worth a watch. Google "teaching tech lowrider" and you will find all three of his videos.

    Duncan
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  11. Aug 9, 2019 #11

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    I'm not at home at the moment, so no photos. However, the way I've arranged the construction, all plywood joins are over 38mm backing doublers, so there is no need for backing plywood doublers.

    The cabin:
    Cutting_sheets1.png

    The tail section:
    Cutting_sheets2.png

    1. Lay these flat on the table
    2. Cut the 19mm x 19mm doublers to fit exactly over these 3mm ply 'templates"
    3. Bond with t88 epoxy
    That's a nice weekend's work. Maybe two. Very pleasant exercise.

    Next, bond the 1.5mm ply skins to the other side (outside)

    Duncan
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
  12. Aug 9, 2019 #12

    12notes

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    I think his confusion is understandable, it's a bit more difficult to find the files than perhaps you realized. Maybe I missed something, but I looked at your build log, and there is no link to the group or files. A google search for "open source airplane Ranger", "open source airplane group", and "open source airplane group Ranger" did not produce relevant results in the first few pages except for a link to the original design thread. Searching the design thread for "open" with the "Search this thread only" option does not return the relevant post as a result. So, I started going through every page of the Ranger design thread and searching for "Open" and found this link in post #299 on page 15. I've been following that thread, but didn't remember that post, understandable as it's nearly 900 posts long. I registered, but have not yet been approved, I assume the files are on here?

    https://groups.io/g/OpenSourceAir

    Could you add that to your build log so it's easier to find in the future?
     
  13. Aug 9, 2019 #13

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    It was both. If you pulled off an unparalleled, world record breaking machine build, but just forgot to take pictures, then it's absolutely heart felt admiration. If you didn't... then it's sarcasm.

    In post #1 you said your CNC machine is ready, but in post #10 you said that you had to farm out some of the parts and your machine won't be finished until next week. ...comments like that raise questions.
     
  14. Aug 9, 2019 #14

    FritzW

    FritzW

    FritzW

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    At this point you still have to pull your own parts for your cutting files out of the DXF's. I've created the models and the DXF's but I've (apparently wrongly) assumed that most people know how to make NC files from them. Like I've been saying, I'm not posting any of MY actual NC files until I've cut them myself and know they *work.

    *sharing un-tested NC files is a big mistake. A missed mouse click or decimal point can mean screwing up $100 worth of plywood. Or worse, driving a cutting tool through the table or running a 50 pound gantry off the end of the table.

    I'll move this discussion over to the Ranger thread tonight... (I'm heading out the door right now)
     
  15. Aug 17, 2019 #15

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Hi again,
    Still on the road, but I have my laptop with me, so I've been doing some more work on the Lone Ranger design.

    I've painstakingly drawn and labeled each of the gussets and fitted them onto a single piece of 19mm x 190mm x 3m Hoop Pine. The CNC router should make short work of these. Well, not that short - it'll take ages, but the results will be great.

    I've also given some thought to the tube landing gear, and (I'm sure this isn't a new idea) I've come up with a configuration which can be used both for nosewheel and for tail dragger configs. I think I won't use shocks at all, but rely instead on the 18" Tundra tyres I plan to use.
    Side_view_Tail_Dragger.png

    Or... by swapping the gear from left/right, we get...
    Side_view_Nosewheel.png

    I've also fiddled with the placement of the parts on the full size plywood sheets so that an entire side can be cut in one piece.
    Cut_sheet.png

    Finally, I've given some thought to micro-adjustment of the wing positioning. I weigh 154 lbs. I plan to use a Briggs & Stratton 810cc engine (or if I can get over my aversion to the 2-stroke noise and mess) a Hirth F23. Both have similar weights. However, lighter (or more commonly) heavier pilots than I would significantly change the CG of this extremely light airplane, so I'll be using a simple fore/aft wing adjustment system consisting of metal plates fixed to the airframe with a number of wing attach points with indicated pilot weights.

    Wing_adjustments.png
     
  16. Aug 17, 2019 #16

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    Yes, I was going to use my Big Twin from Valley Engineering, but at 52kg, it is just too heavy. Bugger. The Hirth F23 only weighs 35kg. More expense...
     
  17. Aug 17, 2019 #17

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    Hmmm, I looked at that and did a double take. It seems to me that the Ranger would be quite adaptable to a biplane with much easier access to the cockpit than most biplanes...
     
  18. Aug 17, 2019 #18

    litespeed

    litespeed

    litespeed

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    Is the weight of the 810cc with redrive and all the weight shaved?

    How many hp do you expect?
     
  19. Aug 17, 2019 #19

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

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    The 810cc Briggs weighs 40kg, and produces 33hp @ 3600 (ED: That's from the SD-1 web site - they call their re-worked version of this engine the SE33). It's a bit difficult to argue with the F23 (35kg, 50hp), except for the noise, messy oil/gas mixing, and the higher initial cost.

    The local racing lawnmower guys use the Briggs 810cc motor, and rev them to 5000. Their comment to me was: "We run them at 5000rpm all day. Generally we push them to 7500rpm without issues, but over 8000rpm we run into reliability issues"

    So I'm wondering about one of their conversions running at 5000rpm. Still thinking... Really would like the sound of a 4-stroke...
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
  20. Aug 17, 2019 #20

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

    pictsidhe

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    My 810 long block with oil filter but no flywheel weighs 21.7kg. The long block will change little. I won't know what all the annoying bits it needs to run will weigh yet. I have got a 1.9kg flywheel that I think will work. The stock one is 8.4kg. I'll be very pleased to reduce the weight of other ancillaries by that fraction. I also need to add a redrive. If I'm really lucky, maybe low 30's.
    The complete engine minus muffler and starter was 35kg.

    Edit, my test engine is actually 656cc, which is a smaller bore version of the 810. Bigger pistons in bigger bores. Weights will be very close.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019

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