The "good" old days.

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Derswede

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Started driving at 8. 1951 GMC pickup. I miss that truck! Was about 12-13 or so, we were building our hangers and ran out of 14' 2" x 4's. Dad told me to run to town to get some. Did so, while I was finishing loading, a local HP Officer pulled into the hardware lumber yard, saw me getting in the truck, cranking up and pulling out. He followed me back to the airport, asked my dad how old I was (not a word to me), and on getting the answer, just told him to wait til I got my license to run errands like that. I thought nothing of it. Heck, I was flying airplanes, driving was a lot easier!

Derswede
 

Pops

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Pops you gotta write an autobiography my man. Doesn't have to be categorized in chapters, just collected stories would be fine.
The real story is my family's history. Starting back from 5 generations to present. Example -- Read the history of the southern WV coal mine wars in the 1920's were our federal gov dropped bombs on U.S. citizens. 2 uncles wanted for murder but was pardoned by the governor. You will never guess who one of the pilots was.
 

Yellowhammer

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That was back in the day that if ya didn't behave yourself, ya got a free trip behind the woodshed for a manners lesson... :)
Indeed! Or like my folks used to say, an attitude adjustment. Back when they would give you a paddling in school., the rule at my home was if you got a whipping at school you got another one when you got home. I toted a lot of arse whippin's to say the least.

Now, many years later, I thank the Good Lord my folks cared enough to administer the punishment.
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
The real story is my family's history. Starting back from 5 generations to present. Example -- Read the history of the southern WV coal mine wars in the 1920's were our federal gov dropped bombs on U.S. citizens. 2 uncles wanted for murder but was pardoned by the governor. You will never guess who one of the pilots was.
Thanks for the lead Pops. I will read and get back with you upon my discovery.

Yellowhammer
 

Pops

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Order this book on E-bay for a little over $4 shipped. Its a good read if you like the history of the Revolutionary war.


5 generations back from me Jacob was a indian scout for George Rogers Clark and George Washington. Book is about what they did.
Veterans received $400 in 1835. The veterans had to prove they were a veteran. I have copies of the hearing at the court house. Two years latter solders were trying to arrest them ( him and his family ), and march them to OK, etc. Then his son George hiding his family in a remote hollow and built a house in front of a cave , and his son Amos as a yankee POW and 2 brothers fighting Gen George Custer. The Grandfather, and my father, professional Gambler , ties to the Mafia. He was very wealthy in the 1930's and IRS took everthing in 1946 ( I had a full time nanny until late 1946) and we would have been homeless if Grandfather didn't have some land where George hid the family from the march to OK. The reason I lived with my GF from 6 to 15 years old. That remote hollow is now know as Indian Springs. I can show you where the house was located.

About a short as I can make it.
 
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Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Order this book on E-bay for a little over $4 shipped. Its a good read if you like the history of the Revolutionary war.


5 generations back from me Jacob was a indian scout for George Rogers Clark and George Washington. Book is about what they did.
Veterans received $400 in 1835. The veterans had to prove they were a veteran. I have copies of the hearing at the court house. Two years latter solders were trying to arrest them ( him and his family ), and march them to OK, etc. Then his son George hiding his family in a remote hollow and built a house in front of a cave , and his son Amos as a yankee POW and 2 brothers fighting Gen George Custer. The Grandfather, and my father, professional Gambler , ties to the Mafia. He was very wealthy in the 1930's and IRS took everthing in 1946 ( I had a full time nanny until late 1946) and we would have been homeless if Grandfather didn't have some land where George hid the family from the march to OK. The reason I lived with my GF from 6 to 15 years old. That remote hollow is now know as Indian Springs. I can show you where the house was located.

About a short as I can make it.


Pops,

Yes sir I will order the book. Being a history teacher you can imagine that my passion runs deep for world and particularly United States history. But not the history that was sugar coated and falsified in the text books I had while in grammar, middle and high school.

About the time I was a sophomore in college I began to realize that there is much more important information to be discovered that tells the whole story and I also learned that just because it is printed in manuscript that it didn't necessarily make it true. I was perturbed to put it lightly. So began my quest for discovery of the truth. Truth in all things. My journey is not complete nor will it ever be complete.

I never for pray for wealth or a long life but only for that elusive wisdom.

The book as well as your family history I am highly interested in. Veterans have been wronged and are still being wronged to this day.

As for the house in Indian Springs, yes sir I would appreciate seeing that if it isn't too much trouble.

Thank you Pops for sharing your life and family's history . It means a great deal to an ole boy like me that was born way past his time.

The question that you posed on who one of the pilot's was that bombed the miner's during the union wars I could not find a definitive answer. I learned that General Billy Mitchell wanted to give them the Curtis LeMay treatment but it said his commanding officer gave strict orders that all U.S. military planes were to be used for reconnaissance only. However, I found that there was a few biplanes that were privately owned and it was they who dropped the bleach bombs and other deadly ordinance.

I could not find the name of any of the pilots that flew the privately owned aircraft or should I say I have not found them yet.

Again thank you.
Semper Fidelis,

-Yellowhammer
 
Joined
Jun 24, 2010
Messages
155
Location
Madera, California U.S.A.
Like all that grew up in that area we had to help. We had hay, stock, grain, pick-up plus assortment of old tractors. At 13 I received restricted license (FOR BUSINESS USE ONLY) We had K6 International we pulled semitrailer I believe only 20 feet. We had contract with Swift for 1cent over Chicago Maret and
at 13 would take that Binder and load of cattle to Cleveland. I was about 4-8 and under 100 pounds.
I carried a block of salt, business use, in my new crosley (had hydraulic disc brakes) that was 1949 or 1950.
 

Pops

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Pops,

Yes sir I will order the book. Being a history teacher you can imagine that my passion runs deep for world and particularly United States history. But not the history that was sugar coated and falsified in the text books I had while in grammar, middle and high school.

About the time I was a sophomore in college I began to realize that there is much more important information to be discovered that tells the whole story and I also learned that just because it is printed in manuscript that it didn't necessarily make it true. I was perturbed to put it lightly. So began my quest for discovery of the truth. Truth in all things. My journey is not complete nor will it ever be complete.

I never for pray for wealth or a long life but only for that elusive wisdom.

The book as well as your family history I am highly interested in. Veterans have been wronged and are still being wronged to this day.

As for the house in Indian Springs, yes sir I would appreciate seeing that if it isn't too much trouble.

Thank you Pops for sharing your life and family's history . It means a great deal to an ole boy like me that was born way past his time.

The question that you posed on who one of the pilot's was that bombed the miner's during the union wars I could not find a definitive answer. I learned that General Billy Mitchell wanted to give them the Curtis LeMay treatment but it said his commanding officer gave strict orders that all U.S. military planes were to be used for reconnaissance only. However, I found that there was a few biplanes that were privately owned and it was they who dropped the bleach bombs and other deadly ordinance.

I could not find the name of any of the pilots that flew the privately owned aircraft or should I say I have not found them yet.

Again thank you.
Semper Fidelis,

-Yellowhammer
George Rogers Clark ask Capt Boman to pick his best men and ask then to volunteer for the mission of taking the British fort. Clark promised to give each one 400 acres in Western Virginia. George Washington said he would ask Congress for the money to pay for the trip and pay for the land.
He never did, Clark stood by his word, but just had enough money to buy each of the volunteers 200 acres of land. Jacob R. got 200 acres of land east of the present town of Fairmont, WV. Clark ended up broke and lived his last years with a daughter. Boman Field airport at Louisville, KY was named after Capt Boman. Jacob was to get $100 for 4 years and the first year was 1835. The first payment was in paper money and he got angry and smoked it in his pipe. Also there was an Indian census in 1835 and that was used to locate the indians for the march to OK. Jacob died in 1937 just before the roundup. So his son moved the family to the remote hideout . There was another indian census starting in 1895 and Grandfather ( 1876-1959) and his brothers are in that censes. Don't know why, after using the censes to locate the indians in 1835, I would never had anything to do with it. Grandfather was 100 % Chickasaw. Being a citizen of the U.S. by being born here did not apply to the Indians until an act of congress in 1929, so he wasn't allowed to vote until that year. Grandfather never had a SS number or received any SS retirement. My father and mother took card of him until he died.
 

challenger_II

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Fisher County, Tx. USA
My great-great-great grand mum's family somehow evaded the exodus from South Carolina. One of her descendants married my great grandad, and then moved to Texas. Makes me a tad bit more Cherokee than That Woman in Massachusetts.
Still, and all, I am pleased with your family heritage, Dan! History is something to be celebrated, not denied!
 

Pops

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I have always loved history. Amazing what you can learn. A few hundred years is not very long.
We all should be proud of our family heritage, had to be strong people or we wouldn't be here.
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
George Rogers Clark ask Capt Boman to pick his best men and ask then to volunteer for the mission of taking the British fort. Clark promised to give each one 400 acres in Western Virginia. George Washington said he would ask Congress for the money to pay for the trip and pay for the land.
He never did, Clark stood by his word, but just had enough money to buy each of the volunteers 200 acres of land. Jacob R. got 200 acres of land east of the present town of Fairmont, WV. Clark ended up broke and lived his last years with a daughter. Boman Field airport at Louisville, KY was named after Capt Boman. Jacob was to get $100 for 4 years and the first year was 1835. The first payment was in paper money and he got angry and smoked it in his pipe. Also there was an Indian census in 1835 and that was used to locate the indians for the march to OK. Jacob died in 1937 just before the roundup. So his son moved the family to the remote hideout . There was another indian census starting in 1895 and Grandfather ( 1876-1959) and his brothers are in that censes. Don't know why, after using the censes to locate the indians in 1835, I would never had anything to do with it. Grandfather was 100 % Chickasaw. Being a citizen of the U.S. by being born here did not apply to the Indians until an act of congress in 1929, so he wasn't allowed to vote until that year. Grandfather never had a SS number or received any SS retirement. My father and mother took card of him until he died.


So much attention and "awareness" goes into the undeserving here as of late while the plight of the Native American people is barely an after thought and has been all of my life. If anybody has a right to complain, it's the America Indian.

When I cover this topic with my students I make sure to explain, with detail what what went down.

-Yellowhammer
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
My great-great-great grand mum's family somehow evaded the exodus from South Carolina. One of her descendants married my great grandad, and then moved to Texas. Makes me a tad bit more Cherokee than That Woman in Massachusetts.
Still, and all, I am pleased with your family heritage, Dan! History is something to be celebrated, not denied!
Funny you mention your family remained in South Carolina when my ancestors did the opposite. In fact, the there is a section dedicated to the migration of my folks. found in the Alabama History textbooks where all ninth graders have to take this course in public schools. The chapter is titled, The Lide's move south and west. A History professor at the University of Alabama did the extensive research on my family. We came down from Darlington and settled in Carloville, Alabama and a few went on to farm cotton in Texas.


-Yellowhammer
 

reo12

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So much attention and "awareness" goes into the undeserving here as of late while the plight of the Native American people is barely an after thought and has been all of my life. If anybody has a right to complain, it's the America Indian.

When I cover this topic with my students I make sure to explain, with detail what what went down.

-Yellowhammer
I grew up having family friends who were Ottawa tribe here in Michigan. Here is a group I discovered when I reconnected with one of my beloved burn nurses from 40 years ago. It is re-member - a group aiding the Indians of Pine Ridge South Dakota. Log into Facebook
 
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Grantham, NH
Back to the "good ol' days" of rural aviation:
Ken Gamble and his Dad, who lived on a small farm north of Hamilton, Ontario, learned to fly when the Canadian government paid for civilian flight training.
In the late 50's, he learned that down in the States, there were hundreds of airplanes rotting into the ground at small, rural airports. Dozens of times, he took his pickup truck, pulling a long trailer, down through NY, PA, OH, IN, and MI, from airport to airport, buying Cubs, Champs, Taylorcrafts, Luscombe's, etc. for $50 to $200 each. He took 'em apart, loaded 'em on his trailer, and hauled 'em across the border, where he stored them vertically, fuselages on their engine mounts, wings on their roots, in his barns (he and his Dad had given up farming), the engines were stored, upside down, on old tires. He sold parts and bits and pieces off of them for several decades to homebuilders.
In the late '80's, when people started paying north of US$20K for a Cub, he invited me up to start building up airplanes from his barn full of parts. Two years and twenty restorations later, he'd run out of airframes, so I returned to the States.

I had a friend in Florida who got dragged around from garage sale to garage sale by his wife. At one, he noticed a wood prop in the shade of the garage. It was attached to a '40 Taylorcraft BC-65. The tail and wings were in the rafters, and on the seat was a box with all her documentation from day one. He asked about the dust covered hulk and was informed it "belonged to Grandpa and it had to go," but they were still figuring out who they could call to come haul it away to the dump. He replied, "I'm your man!" and returned the next day with a trailer, a friend, an FAA Form 8050-1, and one dollar. It took him three years to restore her, and she flew really well after that.
 

Pops

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USA.
So much attention and "awareness" goes into the undeserving here as of late while the plight of the Native American people is barely an after thought and has been all of my life. If anybody has a right to complain, it's the America Indian.

When I cover this topic with my students I make sure to explain, with detail what what went down.

-Yellowhammer
Been looking at the records at the Chickasaw reservation in OK and found two young boys with my last name that made it to OK alive. One was 12 years old and a older brother of 14 years old. Record of them getting married 10 years latter. I need to do more research.
Jacob came to the Clark plantation at Charlottesville, VA at 16 years old with a brother George and G Clark sent them both as Indian spies against the Tories and after 6 months they came back to the plantation and didn't like what they were doing and G. Clark enlisted both as Minute Men for a while. Maybe--- the 12 and 14 year old boys in OK could have been Jacobs great nephews and their parents died on the march to OK.
Jacob and his brother was paid $6 a month as spies. Also they came to the plantation from the VA , KY border area. ( Indian Census ).

When you finish reading the book "Long Knifes". Jacob helped bring Lord Hamilton back to VA and tried for war crimes of paying for white scalps. After that, Jacob was a Indian scout for George Washington chasing and defeating Cornwallis and guarded the British POW's and then send home at the end of the war. And then received the 200 acres in western VA from George Rogers Clark and moved there. ( About 50 miles east of me).

Your class would be interested in who were the Tories. :)
 

Pops

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Back to the "good ol' days" of rural aviation:
Ken Gamble and his Dad, who lived on a small farm north of Hamilton, Ontario, learned to fly when the Canadian government paid for civilian flight training.
In the late 50's, he learned that down in the States, there were hundreds of airplanes rotting into the ground at small, rural airports. Dozens of times, he took his pickup truck, pulling a long trailer, down through NY, PA, OH, IN, and MI, from airport to airport, buying Cubs, Champs, Taylorcrafts, Luscombe's, etc. for $50 to $200 each. He took 'em apart, loaded 'em on his trailer, and hauled 'em across the border, where he stored them vertically, fuselages on their engine mounts, wings on their roots, in his barns (he and his Dad had given up farming), the engines were stored, upside down, on old tires. He sold parts and bits and pieces off of them for several decades to homebuilders.
In the late '80's, when people started paying north of US$20K for a Cub, he invited me up to start building up airplanes from his barn full of parts. Two years and twenty restorations later, he'd run out of airframes, so I returned to the States.

I had a friend in Florida who got dragged around from garage sale to garage sale by his wife. At one, he noticed a wood prop in the shade of the garage. It was attached to a '40 Taylorcraft BC-65. The tail and wings were in the rafters, and on the seat was a box with all her documentation from day one. He asked about the dust covered hulk and was informed it "belonged to Grandpa and it had to go," but they were still figuring out who they could call to come haul it away to the dump. He replied, "I'm your man!" and returned the next day with a trailer, a friend, an FAA Form 8050-1, and one dollar. It took him three years to restore her, and she flew really well after that.
I can remember when Cub's were selling for $250 for a normal Cub and real nice one for $300. I may have had a quarter coin at the time. Knew a man at the airport where I was a bum at 15 years old that bought a T-6 Texan for $500. That was a lot of money for the incomes at that time. I made $0.85 and hour on my first job.
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
The difference between country boys and city boys is obvious. Country boys learn to drive a car at 10 years old. City boys learn to drive and steal cars at 10 years old.


So true, even though I learned to hot wire them myself. Just never stole one. However, I did drive many cars and trucks like I had stolen them. Have the tickets on my driving record to prove it. lol
 
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