Testing Electric Propulsion Unit For a Light Airplane

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YLogvin

New Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2021
Messages
3
Hello everyone, new here.
I want to share the results of our testing of a prototype electric propulsion unit for light aviation with a power of 80-100 hp.
Our tests showed that the 190 kg thrust that we get from our electric setup is enough for the aircraft takeoff and ascent.
🔥🔥✈✈✈🔥🔥
Since we're new to electric aircraft in general, I'm curious to hear some thoughts about our tests from people with more experience.
P.S. English captions available
 

Martin W

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 14, 2021
Messages
65
Modern electric power has no problems or issues.

But in aircraft it always comes down to the weight of the batteries ... and that is usually a problem.
 

henryk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2010
Messages
6,204
Location
krakow,poland
about our tests
=high battery "building"=afterpropeller stream is inverted=lowering thrust force...

=big drag force (bad wheels)=comparable with net thrust...

=10 deg. blade setting=maks. thrust in static,but NO thrust in fly speed...

-for comparation=

CR 2 x 1.7 m LUGAPROP , 70 HP SUZUKI autoconversion =230 kG thrust=


=single reductor , (classic) propeller=180 kG = the same weight !
 

YLogvin

New Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2021
Messages
3
Modern electric power has no problems or issues.

But in aircraft it always comes down to the weight of the batteries ... and that is usually a problem.
That's right, weight is of tremendous importance, but in certain cases, its importance may vary.
Things like your typical training flight (5-30 min).
Casual short domestic flight for fun (30min-1hour)
Fields Irrigation (30-40min)
 

jeffwalin

Active Member
Joined
May 27, 2021
Messages
29
I like the video!! I used to work in a electric vehicle propulsion laboratory in the late 1990's. We ran a Formula Lightning racing car for IUPUI, a university in Indianapolis, IN. We worked closely with Delco on some of the early GM Impact inverters and drivetrains, had a chassis dyno for testing, and used an Aerovironment ABC-150 for battery testing. Mostly lead acid batteries, but we did get into testing Nimh batteries in the end...before the plug was pulled on the GM EV-1.

I think as long as the flights are kept short and too much range is not expected out of an electric propulsion system that purely electric drive systems are feasible. For longer range options serious consideration should be given to parallel-hybrid drive systems, using the electric motor to supplement the internal combustion engine during climbing activities. Use an electric motor kind of like a boosting system for the ICE.

Now, I won't say anything about the vise-grip clamped testing setup at 6:40 in the video. I didn't see that....!!!
 

Cardmarc

Active Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2021
Messages
28
Hybrid is the way to go. A small wankel one rotor diving a generator. Enough batteries for maybe 30 min flight if engine fails.
 
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