Teardrop Pattern Entry

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Yellowhammer

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What a nice gesture. Do these guys buy fuel there? It would be interesting to see how the price of Jet A compares to the price the USG pays for the bulk fuel at their home station. I wonder what those free lunches are costing me.
OTOH, training does have to happen, to include fuel stops away from home.

Yes sir, they do purchase their fuel there. I always wondered why they didn't just gas up on base since it is literally five miles to the east. I guess they have to feel like they are at least giving something for all that free food.
 

Yellowhammer

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I was beginning to wonder when someone would bring up the no radio issue.
I currently base At ansmall airport and I’m familiar with every plane based there every one of them has a radio most of them have more than one and yet if you sit and listen you would swear iapproximately half of the traffic does not have a Electrical system!

I feel your pain sir. One thing that scares the absolute bejesus out of me is the thought of a pilot purposely flying without a radio.

I think it should be illegal. We are way too advanced as a society to not mandate , at a bare minimum, a simple hand held. Of course, it doesn't matter what type of equipment your flying, if you don't use it does no good.
 

tallank

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Sep 22, 2020
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My preferred method of entering the pattern , and what I have always done is to fly at 2,000 agl crossing midfield and perform a "teardrop" in order to place my plane exactly where I would be had I been entering the 45 degree entry point making sure I clear well away from any interference. I certainly keep all aircraft, radio equipped, informed of my intentions.

I like to cross over at 2,000 agl particularly if I have been away from the field I can verify what or who is in the pattern. Safety is paramount.

I primarily fly out of Gulf Shores, Alabama and my airport, Jack Edwards National, is located in very close proximity to Pensacola Naval Air station.

It is not unusual or uncommon to share the patter with either a T-6 Texan II, C-130, T-45 advanced trainers and have, at times, had all three sharing the pattern with me.

The reason we get so much military traffic especially when they are less than five miles away from their home base is that we have an FBO that offers free lunch to all military pilots.

Hell, even the boys at Ft. Rucker fly their Apache Helicopters in for a bite to eat.

Our airport is non towered so it can get busy in a hurry.
My issue with this is, being a long time ago sailplane pilot and a high time civilian Warbird pilot, I will not turn my back on an airport. It makes no sense to me to pass right over a runway and than fly two miles away.
 

Pilot-34

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Most of me is in IL but my hearts in Alaska
I feel your pain sir. One thing that scares the absolute bejesus out of me is the thought of a pilot purposely flying without a radio.

I think it should be illegal. We are way too advanced as a society to not mandate , at a bare minimum, a simple hand held. Of course, it doesn't matter what type of equipment your flying, if you don't use it does no good.
I want to agree with you I really do but it just seers my soul each time another rule regulation or law is created.
So I’m going to have to admit todays system is pretty well done.
And actually people are fairly good at self regulating. Those aircraft that totally lack a radio Are seldom flown at airports even beginning to approach busy.
those that do not like to talk on the radio tend to fly when those particular airports are even less busy.
No it’s certainly not a perfect system and there are those that abuse it. But you’re never going convinced me to vote for another law in this case.
I’ll just throw a rant every once in a while and relieve the pressure!
 

TFF

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Memphis, TN
There are only two types I’m scared about no radio. Old and stupid.

I have known some old guys with no radio or bad radio. Their flying skills are up, but they know at some point that they are not going to die from aviation and get sloppy looking out.

The stupid is the real problem. We had a kid who was taught how to fly but knew no regulations. He took off twice into landing traffic. Adding a radio didn’t help as the FAA told him action would be take if he did it again and had no radio. Got a radio and did it again.

I have seen some handheld installs that were very directional depending on where the receiving radio stood from the cabin structure. .
 

BJC

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I have seen some handheld installs that were very directional depending on where the receiving radio stood from the cabin structure. .
Handhelds need a regular fixed antenna rather than the short whip.


BJC
 

N804RV

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Mount Vernon, WA
What a nice gesture. Do these guys buy fuel there? It would be interesting to see how the price of Jet A compares to the price the USG pays for the bulk fuel at their home station. I wonder what those free lunches are costing me.
OTOH, training does have to happen, to include fuel stops away from home.
Military units get budgeted "X" amount of dollars and "X" amount of fuel. Sometimes it makes economic sense at the squadron level to use some of the dollars when the fuel budget is getting limited, especially around August/September time frame (which is the end of the fiscal year for the government).

When I was in the Nav, we got government credit cards to use to buy fuel away from home. And, we were often given a budget for each cross country. I wouldn't be surprised if something similar is happening with the pilots from NAS P-cola that buy gas as Gulf Shores.
 

N804RV

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Mount Vernon, WA
I feel your pain sir. One thing that scares the absolute bejesus out of me is the thought of a pilot purposely flying without a radio.

I think it should be illegal. We are way too advanced as a society to not mandate , at a bare minimum, a simple hand held. Of course, it doesn't matter what type of equipment your flying, if you don't use it does no good.
In a perfect world, we'd all have radios and perfect radio discipline. But, ....

I often stop talking on the radio and just concentrate on not getting hit when the CTAF gets stupid. No one can possibly know what the heck is going on anyway. I'm better off not adding to the confusion. I just adjust my interval, land and clear the runway. All without talking to anyone. And, much safer than getting involved in gaggle of confusion on the sacred radio.
 

Toobuilder

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I certainly am not afraid of a radio or class B airports or flight following...

But the radio is not a panacea when one guy reports "left downwind" and cant even see the the airport because he's so far out. "My" position to turn base is often MILES different than the ATP student burning hours in the Barron I'm following.

Radios are fine, but often add to the confusion.
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Military units get budgeted "X" amount of dollars and "X" amount of fuel. Sometimes it makes economic sense at the squadron level to use some of the dollars when the fuel budget is getting limited, especially around August/September time frame (which is the end of the fiscal year for the government).

When I was in the Nav, we got government credit cards to use to buy fuel away from home. And, we were often given a budget for each cross country. I wouldn't be surprised if something similar is happening with the pilots from NAS P-cola that buy gas as Gulf Shores.

Funny you mention from August to September because that is busiest time by far for the military trainers. They come in all year but rather thickly during the months you mentioned. When did you do your training for the Navy in the cradle?
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
I want to agree with you I really do but it just seers my soul each time another rule regulation or law is created.
So I’m going to have to admit todays system is pretty well done.
And actually people are fairly good at self regulating. Those aircraft that totally lack a radio Are seldom flown at airports even beginning to approach busy.
those that do not like to talk on the radio tend to fly when those particular airports are even less busy.
No it’s certainly not a perfect system and there are those that abuse it. But you’re never going convinced me to vote for another law in this case.
I’ll just throw a rant every once in a while and relieve the pressure!

Now that you explain it that way I retract my previous statement and ask for forgiveness as I hate new rules, laws, and regulations my self. Especially when the FAA or the Insurance companies are concerned.
 

N804RV

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Mount Vernon, WA
Handhelds need a regular fixed antenna rather than the short whip.


BJC

I use a handheld in my Sonerai. I use the original whip antenna that came with it. It works great with a typical range of 10 miles or so, at the altitudes I usually fly at.

There are a couple of rules you have to observe when using a handheld radio:

1. It must be kept vertical. Com antennas are vertically polarized.

2. It must be held close to your body. Your body is the ground plane for the antenna. If you use a PTT switch, and you are not touching the radio, you will decrease the effective range a bunch.

I clip mine to the canopy cross bar, which is just in front of me at chest level, and I use my hand to press the transmit key on the radio. That alone seems to provide enough ground plane for the antenna.
 

Pops

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The transmitting power of handhelds vary a lot. When buying one , look for a 5 watt transmitting power. Throw the little rubber ducky antenna away if you want enough range to be useful in an airplane if you fly much outside of the pattern. Use a good outside antenna and cut the cable for a low SWR. My little Icom A-6 gets about 120 miles at pattern altitude. I can pull the airplane out of the hanger and get the ATIS from the tower controlled airport 20 miles away 5x5. Same for the AWOS at an airport 27 miles away.
Friend of mine has an grass field airport about 100 miles away, when I'm in the pattern and he is in the pattern at his airport he says it sounds like I'm in the pattern with him and he sounds the same for me. He's using a King 155 in the C-172. If I remember correctly they have 7.5 watts on transmit. The King 165 has a 10 watt transmitter.
 

jedi

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Sahuarita Arizona, Renton Washington, USA
I feel your pain sir. One thing that scares the absolute bejesus out of me is the thought of a pilot purposely flying without a radio.

I think it should be illegal. We are way too advanced as a society to not mandate , at a bare minimum, a simple hand held. Of course, it doesn't matter what type of equipment your flying, if you don't use it does no good.
Where is the button to dislike a post.

I want a no electrical system airplane for all of the benefits they offer.
 
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