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Taylor Titch Anniversary

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fly2kads

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I think that flying a Titch into its "home" field is a pretty fitting tribute, and I'm glad the BBC gave it some coverage. I agree that the Titch is a pretty neat plane! I may have some photos in my stash, so I'll look when I get home.

It has been a while, but someone (cluttonfred?) posted links to archival video footage of Taylor's other design, the Taylor Monoplane. Pretty cool to see it being drawn out of the window of their home!

And what a cool environment for a kid to grow up in...a home filled with airplane parts, and people busy making stuff with their brains and their hands!
 

don january

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Afraid there is not much photos of either the Titch or the Taylor-Mono, Even print's were at a time hard to come by in the US. The Taylor bird's are some beautiful craft's and the Titch is a hot rod! kinda reminds me of the Cassutte. I like how the wing and gear and some numbers match in with the KR family. I have to sit back and realize just how long it's been since the Titch was first flown. The Taylor-mono is one of the most beautiful all wood planes built I think. May the plane live on!!!
 

Kevin N

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I don't know how to post links but if another forum member who is also an EAA member gets into the Sport Aviation archives you will find the March 1974 issue has one of the finest TT's ever built. I know the builder well. N14J Built by Jim Miller. Jim is also an EAA judge for the experimental plans built category.
 

Tiger Tim

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This is the Taylor I used to see around:


I have no idea if it was a Monoplane or a Titch but it was clearly quite modified and what I remember most is that it was a really tiny airplane. Unfortunately the little Spitfire suffered an engine failure on takeoff which the pilot thankfully survived but the plane was a write off. Last I heard, after the builder passed from natural causes, the estate sold off the pieces and they ended up in... Australia? Or maybe it was his tailwind that went down under but in any case rumour was that the Taylor was being put back together, hopefully just for static display.
 

Riggerrob

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.... Titch or the Taylor-Mono .......... I like how the wing and gear and some numbers match in with the KR family. !
...............................................................

Yes!
Ken Rand based his planes on Taylor's designs. KR-series retain Taylor's fuselage, which is is basically a plywood box. The primary difference is that Rand used foam blocks to replace the dozens of fiddly little ribs in the flying surfaces. Then he covered the KR-series in fibreglas - instead of the original doped fabric.
 

don january

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Do tell. is the Titch made of wood or is it a tube and fabric based construction ? Hp range, Would like to compare with the Taylor-mono.avitar hba.jpg
 
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JimCrawford

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The Taylor Mono and Titch are both of all wood construction. I have a complete Taylor Mono airframe which is about to have it's 1835 VW installed as soon as the heads come back from having the second plug holes cut. As anybody who has built an "all wood" aircraft will tell you there are an awful lot of metal fittings to hold all the wood bits together!
The Titch was Taylor's second design and was to the formula racing rules as a competition entry (Pilot magazine?) to get formula racing better established in Europe. I seem to remember it came second to the Rollason Beta. Of course they would be outclassed today with the plastic fantastics that race in the States, and the emphasis here now seems to be in the development of electric racers, probably because there is much more likelihood of serious sponsorship and public exposure to develop electric flight than to push an over-revd O-100 into a tiny airframe.
The Mono was also built to racing rules - the formula V which never seemed to get going and is invisible nowadays. The original Mono literature declared the aircraft to be aerobatic but this was dropped by the PFA as the LAA was then. I picked up in conversation with one of the engineers that this was because the stick force per G is too low with the consequent risk of overstressing if clumsily handled. His opinion was that the Tipsy Nipper would also suffer the same problem if it were not for it's providence as a fully certified aerobatic aircraft made in substantial numbers.

Jim
 

BJC

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The Mono was also built to racing rules - the formula V which never seemed to get going and is invisible nowadays.
While the Monoplane may (uncompetitively) fit into Formula V rules, the original design and prototype far pre-date the creation of Formula V.

This is not a criticism; I wanted a Monoplane until I examined the Prototype and discovered that I don’t fit it.


BJC
 

don january

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Both the Taylor- Titch and Taylor-mono have a sling seat and if your over 5' 4" your rump will be sitting on the floor and I believe that is why there is duel elevator cables running down each side of the aircraft as diagram shows. I've found that when the seat is in the lowest position possible the back of your legs below the knees rub against the front root spar and is very uncomfortable. I'm 5'3" and there is very little room between the shoulders and side of the Fus. Beings I'm a small fella I was able to change the sling seat position to allow elevator control with a single cable like the KR-2 has but even then the wind screen needs to be near 10" tall to work effectively. WAF from a KR-2 work fine as does the hinges for controls. I found the LG to be a challenge mainly because of the amount of weight that you end up with on the prints finished product. I do like how the Titch has the joining of the wings at the center of the wing between your knees and to me that appears to be a much stronger set up for racing. If I was to go WOT around pylons or aerobatics in my Taylor-mono I think I'd for sure want some flying wires or struts to support the HZ stab. My members build log covers some of these areas z-titch.jpg
 

Tailwind_Fan

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Yes, it’s pretty much all wood. Which is different than the Tailwind I’m working on now. The plans call for 65-105 hp, and I know where I can find a conical mount Lycoming O-235 to use, that’s from a Piper Colt...
My plans show cables only for the rudder, all other controllers are push-rods.
The Tailwind also uses push-tubes, but the flap and ailerons are on concentric torque tubes for the surface leading edge, so they ride in concentric bearings that bolt into the rear of the wooden wing. This is because the Tailwind wing is pretty much an enclosed structure.
The Titch plans shows a cross tube that actuates the flaps that are hinged with piano hinges on the bottom. The ailerons use a piano hinge on the top that has enough clearance for the downward deflection. The push-tubes act through a set of bell cranks, which produce the differential deflection of 25 degrees up and 10 degrees down called for by the specifications.
Terry recommended that I build the fuselage with the 2” wider option.

-Alana
 
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n45bm

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Yes, it’s pretty much all wood. Which is different than the Tailwind I’m working on now. The plans call for 65-105 hp, and I know where I can find a conical mount Lycoming O-235 to use, that’s from a Piper Colt...
My plans show cables only for the rudder, all other controllers are push-rods.
The Tailwind also uses push-tubes, but the flap and ailerons are on concentric torque tubes for the surface leading edge, so they ride in concentric bearings that bolt into the rear of the wooden wing. This is because the Tailwind wing is pretty much an enclosed structure.
The Titch plans shows a cross tube that actuates the flaps that are hinged with piano hinges on the bottom. The ailerons use a piano hinge on the top that has enough clearance for the downward deflection. The push-tubes act through a set of bell cranks, which produce the differential deflection of 25 degrees up and 10 degrees down called for by the specifications.
Terry recommended that I build the fuselage with the 2” wider option.

-Alana
I too have the Taylor Titch plans and have built most of the metal parts, including the spring gear parts that bolt to the spar. I did not care for the spring steel gear, though I have it on my Corby Starlet. Terry also recommended the 2" wider option. I have the Starlet and currently trying to finish the painting on my Arion Lightning. Maybe I'll continue on the Titch afterwards. Maybe. The Titch is a beautiful plane though (as is my Corby).
 

n45bm

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For those of us who like little scratch builts I thought you'd enjoy this.
The English plane you could make at home marks 50th year

I wish these articles would post better photos so if anyone here has a neat photo of a Taylor Titch please post it. It's a neat airplane.

Scrap
The tapered wing, tail and that Spitfire like vertical tail make the Titch a beautiful plane. Terry Taylor recommended an 0-200 Continental for power. Fast plane.
 

n45bm

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Feb 20, 2019
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Location
Seguin
Afraid there is not much photos of either the Titch or the Taylor-Mono, Even print's were at a time hard to come by in the US. The Taylor bird's are some beautiful craft's and the Titch is a hot rod! kinda reminds me of the Cassutte. I like how the wing and gear and some numbers match in with the KR family. I have to sit back and realize just how long it's been since the Titch was first flown. The Taylor-mono is one of the most beautiful all wood planes built I think. May the plane live on!!!
The Corby Starlet ain't too shabby either. Here's a pic of mine.
 

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