Table saw safety blade video.... amazing

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by BBerson, May 27, 2010.

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  1. May 27, 2010 #1

    BBerson

    BBerson

    BBerson

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    Check out this saw blade that stops before you can cutoff your finger.
    We could use ideas like this crumpling metal part to absorb airplane crashes also, I think.

    YouTube - SAWSTOP in TimeWarp
     
  2. May 28, 2010 #2

    Autodidact

    Autodidact

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    It is amazing to me that the saw companies resisted this because it cost too much money. A good example of the disconnect between the practice of accounting and the practice of being human.
     
  3. May 28, 2010 #3

    scuba72

    scuba72

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    Okay, I have cut a few fingers on table saws, but don't let the government see this because before long it will be required on all saws and the price will go up.

    Respecting the blade and the damage it can do is the key to safety.
     
  4. May 28, 2010 #4

    skeeter_ca

    skeeter_ca

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    I remember it being very expensive and if it goes off there are alot of expensive parts to replace.

    That's why GOD gave us spare fingers!

    skeeter
     
  5. May 28, 2010 #5

    Rom

    Rom

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    My table saw finger cut was none to pleasant. A safety device that doesn't hinder production would be good.
    I remember when hard hats, safety glasses, dust masks and and hearing protection were considered a nuisance at work. Today, these are considered mandatory for good reason.
     
  6. May 28, 2010 #6

    Joe Fisher

    Joe Fisher

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    Well I don't know about every one else but I have an ex stream respect for power tools and high voltage. I have been using power tools since I was 8 I have a lot of scars(none from power tools) but I have all my fingers.
     
  7. May 28, 2010 #7

    etterre

    etterre

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    Meh - not impressed, even slightly scared of the thing. Strikes me as the sort of safety feature that puts you down the confident/cocky/lazy/dead road.

    I stopped watching when they started the buildup for doing a high-speed camera run with the inventor trying it out on his own finger.

    I do actually get the concept of how much energy needs to be dissipated. I thought it was kinda interesting that they didn't talk at all about how the blade sank under the table because it ripped off of it's normal mount. :ponder: They probably wouldn't want you to think too hard about what might happen if the stacked dado set wobbled off to one side and shot out from underneath the table.:whistle:
     
  8. May 28, 2010 #8

    Autodidact

    Autodidact

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    If you have employees that you pay to run a table saw all day, sooner or later one of them will put a finger into a blade. It is inevitable. I did it. I've seen others do it. I got to keep my digit, others were not so lucky. It is better to ruin a piece of machinery than to cut off someones finger. Either way it costs money. Messed up steel is better than messed up flesh.
     
  9. May 28, 2010 #9

    MadRocketScientist

    MadRocketScientist

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    It also wont stop the tablesaw launching a piece of wood out the back at high speed, I still have all my fingers...

    Shannon.
     
  10. May 29, 2010 #10

    skeeter_ca

    skeeter_ca

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    I heard somewhere that a missing finger is worth $10,000 in a workmans comp. claim. I guess the doo-hickey and replacement parts would be cheaper. Maybe even save on insurance premuims.

    skeeter
     
  11. May 29, 2010 #11

    DarylP

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    I guess the guy that had the patient made a fortune on that. If they made that for a prop...would you test it with a hand. :gig:

    Its like the episode of Myth Busters where they heated lead to 700 degrees and then dunked their bare hands into it. They dipped their hand into water first, and it supposedly coated the hands...?? I don't know the theory but it worked. Now would you get me to stick my hand into a vat of 700 degree molten lead, or in front of a spinning blade? %4*&8^%$@#$ NO! :gig:
     

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