T100D Mariah ultralight

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JamesF

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Mar 30, 2015
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15
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Clovis, NM
Hello,
When you have time, please look up the Mariah ultralight. It is all wood which I like. What do you guys think?
It is here: adamsaero.com
Thanks,
James Fuller
 

JamesF

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Joined
Mar 30, 2015
Messages
15
Location
Clovis, NM
I like it designed by Gene Turner, and I have a set of plans for it
Bill,
I am waiting for my plans to arrive. Due Monday. I’m thinking that it will need more than 20 HP. If is 4500 ASL here
So I need to find a 30 HP (or so) engine at 60 lbs or so. A half VW would be great but they’re difficult to keep below 90 lbs. did you get your plans from Mr. Turner?
James Fuller
 

TiPi

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Aug 25, 2019
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Mackay (AUS)
I think the only 4-stroke engine (direct drive) that will meet your weight restriction is the Briggs 38 conversion as done by the MC-30 Luciole builders. It develops 24-26hp, no weight listed but likely to be under 30kg, the aircraft empty weight is 94kg.
 

D_limiter

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Jul 13, 2018
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68
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Norcal
That is an interesting design! I have never seen it before - thanks for bringing it to my attention. I may have to get the plans also.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Feb 6, 2011
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631
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Salem, Oregon, USA
Bill,
I am waiting for my plans to arrive. Due Monday. I’m thinking that it will need more than 20 HP. If is 4500 ASL here
So I need to find a 30 HP (or so) engine at 60 lbs or so. A half VW would be great but they’re difficult to keep below 90 lbs. did you get your plans from Mr. Turner?
James Fuller
I'm not so sure you need a more horsepower, the T-100 & Skypup both have similar span loadings. And a Research (NACA) shows span loading is a good indicator of performance at altitude. And the Skypup flew ok at Grand Junction with a Cuyuna 215
 

Victor Bravo

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Jul 30, 2014
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KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
The Mariah was (reportedly) test flown and operated at Mojave and neighboring California City, California. The density altitude can get pretty impressive in that area. My beloved Cal City airport is 2437 MSL, and surface temperatures will get to the 110-115 degree F level this time of year. Almost identical for Mojave, and Mojave has an extra helping of wind.

So if Turner was"operating" the Mariah in these parts, even during more pleasant conditions than our famous temp and wind extremes, it must have had a reasonable capability with whatever engine he used. It may not need 50% more power.
 

D_limiter

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Ok, I'm in. Just bought the plans and looking forward to receiving them!
 

Victor Bravo

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KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
FWIW, I absolutely cannot ecommend test flying the Mariah (or any ultralight) at California City or Mojave unless it is in very calm conditions. "Normal conditions" at these airports are not often favorable to ultralights.

There have been recorded reports found in ancient scrolls, speaking of calm conditions at these two airports, but these reports are usually found in the same sentence as reports of the Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot, the Narwhal, the Kraken, and World Peace.
 

D_limiter

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I may need to pick your brains someday. I'm in the Bay Area and want to fly through your neck of the woods to visit the Death Valley Airports (not in an ultralight!). All that restricted airspace and mountains look a bit intimidating. Not to speak of the wind! We can get gusty conditions, but I have heard things are on a whole different level there.
 

Victor Bravo

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KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
The terrain out there, when seen from 2500 to 7500 AGL, looks every bit as intimidating as the sectional chart does. If looking at the chart makes you stop and think about it for a moment, that means you're reading the chart correctly.

It's also pretty desolate, if you have to land somewhere due to some mechanical issue you might be out there by yourself. It's probably not nearly as bad as some places in the Outback or Antarctica (or "the sandbox" where our military is running around), but it will definitely feel that way compared to the Bay Area.

The restricted areas are there for a reason, and thee stuff going on in those particular areas is fairly serious.

If you give me an idea of what type of airplane you're going to be doing this trip in, I can offer some suggestions on a route, places to go or not go, etc.
 

D_limiter

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Thank you! I'll message you so I don't hijack the thread more than I already have.
 

D_limiter

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Apparently, the engine called for in the Mariah is the Cuyuna 2SI two stroke at about 20hp and 40-45 pounds. Just wondering if there are other engines in the same hp/weight class I should look at as well.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Feb 6, 2011
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631
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Salem, Oregon, USA
FWIW, I absolutely cannot ecommend test flying the Mariah (or any ultralight) at California City or Mojave unless it is in very calm conditions. "Normal conditions" at these airports are not often favorable to ultralights.

There have been recorded reports found in ancient scrolls, speaking of calm conditions at these two airports, but these reports are usually found in the same sentence as reports of the Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot, the Narwhal, the Kraken, and World Peace.
You forgot the very common "Brick Lifting Thermals" (BLTs) that are present during those time periods
 

b7gwap

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Sep 1, 2014
Messages
266
Location
UT
Anyone have any experience building and flying the Mariah? I’ve always liked the write up for the plans offer, but doesn’t seem like it’s been built in appreciable numbers. Is it like the ULF-1,very technical, requiring hand planes and jigs, balsa wood? Or is it just that aluminum tube ULs became more popular? Something else?
 
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