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Dan Thomas

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It wasn't intended to be a direct analogy, just the concept that food labels and such made people a lot more aware of what they were ingesting than they were before food labels. All the preservatives and chemicals that are in mass-market packaged foods are still a big problem, but even with what there is now people are beginning to understand how much processed sugar and fats they're putting in their mouth. Still a long way to go of course.

The overall point was that the average Birkenstock-wearing, tree-hugging, self-righteous dude who scowls in anger at you when you drive a gasoline powered car... has no idea that their Bernie bumper stickered Prius is not the planet-saving "clean and green" hero they were convinced it was, once they are forced to think about where the batteries and electricity come from.

Those same pompous and self-righteous folks are now starting to make life miserable for anyone using leaded airplane gasoline, so this is actually very relevant to private aviation.

For the record I would be VERY happy to have an electric aircraft to experiment with, and see how much use I could get out of it, etc. I saw one of the early electric self-launch sailplanes demonstrated by a friend of mine at Oshkosh and was absolutely astonished by its capabilities. Sailplanes and sailplane-ish efficient powerplanes are a perfect use of electric aircraft tech.
A couple of generations ago a bunch of people managed to get nuclear power painted really black, and so we have few nuclear power sources now.

This generation is successfully getting fossil fuels despised, and are pushing electric as the answer.

The next generation will be agitating against the monstrous environmental and human damage caused by mining and processing rare earths for electric stuff.

The generation after that will be agitating for nuclear power so they can survive the winters.
 

Dan Thomas

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6,168
The point would be to have two-stroke power-to-weight-ratio in real plane sizes.
Back in the 1960s one of the magazines such as Popular Mechanics had an article on the development of a two-stroke, six-cylinder radial aircraft engine. I can't find it anywhere on the 'net. It was right on the cover of the magazine, just
like all the other fantastic stuff that we were going to see soon. Nothing ever came of it, of course, just like almost all that other fantastic stuff we were going to see soon. The paper version of vaporware.

Detroit Diesel Allison built two-stroke truck and bus engines for decades. They had superchargers to force the air into the cylinders instead of using the crankcase. Many millions built. They couldn't meet tightening emissions standards and were on their way out 30 years ago.
 

Bill-Higdon

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Salem, Oregon, USA
Back in the 1960s one of the magazines such as Popular Mechanics had an article on the development of a two-stroke, six-cylinder radial aircraft engine. I can't find it anywhere on the 'net. It was right on the cover of the magazine, just
like all the other fantastic stuff that we were going to see soon. Nothing ever came of it, of course, just like almost all that other fantastic stuff we were going to see soon. The paper version of vaporware.

Detroit Diesel Allison built two-stroke truck and bus engines for decades. They had superchargers to force the air into the cylinders instead of using the crankcase. Many millions built. They couldn't meet tightening emissions standards and were on their way out 30 years ago.
McCulloch TSIR-5190 McCulloch TSIR-5190 - Wikipedia

 

R90s

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31693E47-871C-4A05-B9A1-E3994BF7D489.jpeg
Bigger than a R/C engine, the 2-stroke radial Trossi Monaco had twin blowers and split-single (twingle of Allstate motorcycle fame) cylinders. Advanced engine for the time but poor car design resulted in no wins, but no ‘30s GP horror show wrecks so you can still see The machine during your next visit to Turin (when ever Italy reopens). The mind can sometimes wander on rainy days like today - imagining the fabrication of a crank for a radial with split-single cylinders.
 

Sockmonkey

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Apr 24, 2014
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Flint, Mi, USA
A couple of generations ago a bunch of people managed to get nuclear power painted really black, and so we have few nuclear power sources now.

This generation is successfully getting fossil fuels despised, and are pushing electric as the answer.

The next generation will be agitating against the monstrous environmental and human damage caused by mining and processing rare earths for electric stuff.

The generation after that will be agitating for nuclear power so they can survive the winters.
Part of that was that was because it was overhyped while at the same time downplaying the risks in ways that put the public in danger. Nowadays, we know how to make it safe, but half the public still thinks a reactor can explode like an atomic bomb.
Back in the 1960s one of the magazines such as Popular Mechanics had an article on the development of a two-stroke, six-cylinder radial aircraft engine. I can't find it anywhere on the 'net. It was right on the cover of the magazine, just
like all the other fantastic stuff that we were going to see soon. Nothing ever came of it, of course, just like almost all that other fantastic stuff we were going to see soon. The paper version of vaporware.

Detroit Diesel Allison built two-stroke truck and bus engines for decades. They had superchargers to force the air into the cylinders instead of using the crankcase. Many millions built. They couldn't meet tightening emissions standards and were on their way out 30 years ago.
I wish they would bring back the Detroit Diesel. Now they have additives and stuff in the fuel to meet emissions standards.
View attachment 110998
Bigger than a R/C engine, the 2-stroke radial Trossi Monaco had twin blowers and split-single (twingle of Allstate motorcycle fame) cylinders. Advanced engine for the time but poor car design resulted in no wins, but no ‘30s GP horror show wrecks so you can still see The machine during your next visit to Turin (when ever Italy reopens). The mind can sometimes wander on rainy days like today - imagining the fabrication of a crank for a radial with split-single cylinders.
I've had that thought myself.
Also, the Scuderi cycle is a good match for a radial configuration even without a blower.
 
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