Structural Foam Suppliers in Australia

Discussion in 'Composites' started by DaveD, Feb 6, 2013.

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes Forum by donating:

  1. Feb 22, 2013 #21

    autoreply

    autoreply

    autoreply

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    10,732
    Likes Received:
    2,537
    Location:
    Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Max elongation is proportional to t/D, t, total thickness of the pultrusion, D diameter of the coil. So for a thickness of 0.8 mm and an elongation of 1% we could wrap it up to 8 cm diameter. So tight might be a bit too much, but 15-20 cm is just fine.
     
  2. Feb 22, 2013 #22

    rtfm

    rtfm

    rtfm

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Messages:
    3,168
    Likes Received:
    563
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Hi,
    And don't forget, Jim Marske has quoted $50 to ship 250m of the .125 round rods to me here in Brisbane. So freight isn't an issue.

    Regards,
    Duncan
     
  3. Feb 22, 2013 #23

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Messages:
    2,098
    Likes Received:
    369
    Location:
    Zagreb HR
    Dave, thanks for clarifying. I always thought that CF rods can be round, rectangular, oval, filled, hollow, I had no idea that when people talk about rods they mean filled and solid profiles... It does confuse things a bit, torque and push-pull rods and shafts are usually hollow. ;)
     
  4. Feb 22, 2013 #24

    DaveD

    DaveD

    DaveD

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    320
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    Thanks for the info I'd definitely derate the published data! Not sure i agree with round being best. A section with flat sides will have a larger surface area to bond to for a given volume. Plus being able to stack them more tightly will give a better fibre volume fraction i.e. better strength to weight ratio.
     
  5. Mar 20, 2013 #25

    matthass

    matthass

    matthass

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2009
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    Hi All,

    Latest search for extruded polystyrene foam suppliers in Melbourne area:
    For nominal 2.4 x .6 m and 100mm thick:

    COMPANY TEL PRODUCT PRICE
    Aus-styrene 9687 7500 Isoboard $64 (75mm thick)
    Styrapak 9308 8455 $190 (1200mm wide)
    Foamular 9532 0131 FM300 $140
    Solid Soln. 9579 2044 Styrofoam $163

    Most of the spec sheets are pretty unequivocal and dont specify too closely. Anyone know how these manufacturers tie in with the tests done in Australia by Mike, "Peel testing of foams" in particular the Dow LB X that got pretty good results?

    Take care out there! Matt
     
  6. Mar 20, 2013 #26

    flyoz

    flyoz

    flyoz

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2008
    Messages:
    149
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Near Sydney
    I did the testing . No connection at all . Not one foam sample given to me or any discount . The only foam sample i got was from another builder to see how it compared . The one thing i learnt is you need to do some objective testing yourself - the specifications are only a guide . The tests i did were basic but got good repeatable results .All foams even from the same manufacturer are not the same .
    Flyoz
     
  7. Mar 23, 2013 #27

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    DangerZone

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2011
    Messages:
    2,098
    Likes Received:
    369
    Location:
    Zagreb HR
    I had similar results when testing some XPS foams, they differ slightly from specs and among different producers. Which foams did you test and what were your results?


    Has anyone tested the most often used extruded polystyrene foams (BASF green, Dow Chem blue, Bachl yellow) and made some comparative analysis..?
     
  8. Mar 23, 2013 #28

    Lendo

    Lendo

    Lendo

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    287
    Likes Received:
    45
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Stay away from the standard/ hight density polystyrene foams, the compression strength is too low. You need a good compression strength to transfer the loads from the outer skin to the inner skin. The High spec foams which is compatible with Last-a-foam is H60, most supplierst supply H80 as a standard, I find the H80 better as the H60 is a little soft INHO. The last a foam is more brittle but easier to sand, but not available in Aust. The Divinycell etc are rated a fair bit stronger than the Last-A foam, but the latter seems harder (more dense) than the H60, hence my preference for the H80.

    Carbon Rods from the US have a Compression strength of 280,000 psi, I haven't found any anywhere near that from Europe, most are half that strength - the secret is in the manufacturing and perhaps using high modulus carbon. Even so the lab testing is not real world experience and derating is necessary , I and others use 200,000 psi in the calculations (Marske Manual).

    Therer has been quite a debate about' Volume to surface area', the round rods win, as well they also allow more resin around the rods to maxamize adhesion. Some testing has found the resin content between the flat rods too thin and separation occurs - my advice, take it or leave it.
    George (down under)

    I use the Civil Engineering formula for Beam Buckling for the Web calculations.
    George (down under)
     
  9. Mar 24, 2013 #29

    autoreply

    autoreply

    autoreply

    Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2009
    Messages:
    10,732
    Likes Received:
    2,537
    Location:
    Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Which companies?
    All use the same two types of fibers (HM or HT), so except for resin, I don't see why European manufacturers would be any different? I've measured values of around 2000 MPa in HT pultrusions, though HM would be a more logical choice for most airplanes.
     
  10. May 13, 2016 #30

    Clarasonic

    Clarasonic

    Clarasonic

    New Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2016
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Phetchabun
    Hello,
    At our Thailand factory we have a warehouse of many types of inner core rigid foam blocks that we can slice to any thickness ranging from 1mm and higher.
    Popular materials we offer include: Airex, Divinycell, Rohacell and Sonic PVC foams.
    Our factory also has thermal forming process which allows us to press composite materials such as carbon fiber + foam + Kevlar (etc.) to create very strong, rigid parts.
    New to our product list is composite honeycomb such as Nomex and Kevlar at various density strengths.
    Please feel free to visit our website Clarasonic : Distributor of ROHACELL - High Fidelity Speaker Cone Material for more details or contact us at sales@clarasonic.com
    We look forward to the possibility to fulfill your material needs.
    Thank you and Cheers!!!
    Nick
     

Share This Page

arrow_white