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blane.c

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Jun 27, 2015
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capital district NY
Some personal observations and opinions; The empennage is often overlooked or at least not given a thorough look in stol type aircraft. If the empennage quits working before the wing does much of the thought and effort put into the wing design is never realized. The empennage in stol type aircraft because of the relatively high hp/thrust usually takes an awful beating and many designs suffer because of this. The tailwheel also suffers much abuse being drug thru gravel (more like rocks) and brush (small trees) and most anything else you can think of and it and whatever it is attached to needs to be of a "robust" design. One of the things I like the most about vortex generators is the additional control and authority they give to the ailerons, being able to pick a wing up when you are slow can be of critical importance. Most people undervalue the ability to kill lift especially in a stol type aircraft, remember "you can not put the brakes on three feet in the air" and sooner or later you are going to desperately want to. I highly recommend spoilers but at least something that is easy to manipulate and will kill lift quickly. An additional advantage to spoilers is that you can set them before exiting the plane to tie down in strong winds which is a great aid believe me. Tires are also often under appreciated and should be selected to compliment the landing gear, area you will be landing in and the attitude that the aircraft sits. I have with 4 psi in 30" tundra tires rolled over fairly good sized rocks, there ability to conform to unusual shaped and substantial sized objects and roll over them cannot be over appreciated. Also these tires are completely molded thru the center area at the rim and the valve stem is recessed into the tire not in the rim, this enables you to vigorously apply the brakes and if the tires spin on the rims it will not shear off the valve stem. Handles permanently attached to the fuselage and providing the ability to get a good hold on the aircraft are extremely useful, especially one that you can hang onto at the boot cowl so you can prop the plane while in the mud, on ice, or on skiis, and also at the empennage so you pick up the tail and move the airplane around in slippery, mucky, slimy conditions. It can be awfully hard to position a slippery airplane in the muck.

I encourage you to look at Atlee Dodge products if you are not already familiar with them, many probably most of them were designed and made because of fatal and injurious design flaws in aircraft and they will point out areas of aircraft that need close attention to detail to avoid similar mistakes.
 
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DangerZone

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WBS

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Dec 9, 2015
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Spring, TX
"The Ducted Propeller for STOL Airplanes"

"AN INVESTIGATION OF THE SHROUDED PROPELLER PROPULSIVE SYSTEM ON THE
MARVELETTE AIRCRAFT"

"XV-11A DESCRIPTION AND PRELIMINARY FLIGHT TEST"

A Sadler Piranha general configuration pusher using this tech might be quite an interesting aircraft.
 

DangerZone

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I was at the Varazdin Air Show yesterday and saw the Flamingo fly at 35km/h (19kts) during the demonstration of slow flight. Sure, it has a 135HP Rotax engine so the prop was pulling, but still impressive engineering.

b5d44f_1d972b2b4b95467e80f75d5ab27700b1~mv2.jpg
 

homebuilderfan

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Feb 22, 2015
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Italy
I was at the Varazdin Air Show yesterday and saw the Flamingo fly at 35km/h (19kts)......
hmmmm.... how can you say the speed it was flying? The attitude should be extremely skyward; in this condition the instrument (anemometer) is not reliable enough.
Anyway I saw a lighter aircraft (ICP Bingo), 503 Rotax powered (50 hp),slots, full throttle (obviously...), flying in a skyward attitude, the anemometer showing something near the zero.(*)
The Bingo came from the Savannah: was a lighter, simpler Savannah; the weight decreased (about 245 kg. flyable); a really good slow flyer (max cruise speed about 110 km/h), funny and really, really safe. No bad habits.

As I said it could achieve the same performances, using 50 hp.(instead of 135) and having a simple, conventional riveted frame.


(*) I have been flying it several dozens hours.
 
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