Steve Henry's 2.5' take-off

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,131
Location
CT, USA
All it takes is enough wind. Landing becomes interesting, though.

Still impressive, though.
 

lr27

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2007
Messages
3,822
I suspect a very light cowl would help with the takeoff more than the weight would hurt. Plus it would reduce fuel consumption. But it wouldn't help with the landing.
 

SheepdogRD

Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2010
Messages
6
Location
Winston, GA, USA
What engine is in that thing?
Bob
It's an Edge Perrformance (EPeX) 300 hp turbocharged and intercooled Yamaha Apex fuel-injected snowmobile engine. That design has turned out more than 380 hp on the Edge dyno, but Steve operates his at the 300 hp level. The Highlander itself is much-modified from stock. The engine and airframe mods are available from Steve at Wild West Aircraft. (Years of racing experience and fierce competitive spirit must be obtained elsewhere.)
 

12notes

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,020
Location
Louisville, KY
Steve is a very very talented pilot, and a great guy.

I'm sure he will eventually manage to shave off that embarrassing extra .5 ft from his takeoff roll.
Look, I know you think highly of him, but there is no possible way for him to ever shave off .5 feet from his takeoff roll. It doesn't matter how much power he adds, any weight removed, airfoil changes, or what technique he uses, it's just not physically possible for him to reduce that takeoff roll.

The brakes were locked, nothing was rolling. It was a takeoff skid.
 

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,131
Location
CT, USA
Look, I know you think highly of him, but there is no possible way for him to ever shave off .5 feet from his takeoff roll. It doesn't matter how much power he adds, any weight removed, airfoil changes, or what technique he uses, it's just not physically possible for him to reduce that takeoff roll.
Sure it is, just gotta have a windier day. That 2.5' takeoff was made possible by the strong wind he was flying in. If the wind equals the stall speed the ground roll is zero. Done it many times in PPGs. 'Course it's a lot riskier in an airplane.

It's why he was able to take off with the tires locked, too... with that wind and the plane in a 3 point attitude there wasn't much weight and thus traction on the wheels.
 

12notes

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,020
Location
Louisville, KY
Sure it is, just gotta have a windier day. That 2.5' takeoff was made possible by the strong wind he was flying in. If the wind equals the stall speed the ground roll is zero. Done it many times in PPGs. 'Course it's a lot riskier in an airplane.

It's why he was able to take off with the tires locked, too... with that wind and the plane in a 3 point attitude there wasn't much weight and thus traction on the wheels.
Apparantly, you responded before reading the last part of my post.

There was no roll. You can't have negative roll unless you put reverse motors on the wheels.
 

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,131
Location
CT, USA
Sure you can, if the wind's faster than your stall speed and you let it blow you backward. Landing would be a challenge though...
 

12notes

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,020
Location
Louisville, KY
I was assuming a pilot who didn't have a death wish, but I guess you could take off in conditions like that.
 

Toobuilder

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 19, 2010
Messages
4,673
Location
Mojave, Ca
There are days here in Mojave where my 65 hp Taylorcraft could do a 2 foot takeoff roll.

I call those occasions "drinking days".

A short takeoff into a hurricane headwind is about as valid as the RV guys bragging about a 200 knot groundspeed while flying in the Jetstream with a 75 knot push...

Complete nonsense.
 

BJC

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Oct 7, 2013
Messages
10,830
Location
97FL, Florida, USA
There are days here in Mojave where my 65 hp Taylorcraft could do a 2 foot takeoff roll.

I call those occasions "drinking days".

A short takeoff into a hurricane headwind is about as valid as the RV guys bragging about a 200 knot groundspeed while flying in the Jetstream with a 75 knot push...

Complete nonsense.
“Drinking days” prevailed during the second hang gliding contest held in GA (Lookout Mountain) and TN (Whitwell) circa 1979. Launches of gliders involved four people helping the pilot get the glider to the launch ramp. When he was ready, the four people released the glider, and the unpowered takeoff roll (run) was zero inches. A slight increase of the angle of attack created lift that raised the gliders almost vertically.

Yup, wind is important to flight; that is why I have a big, expensive fan on the front of my airplane.

Still, I enjoyed seeing the video.


BJC
 

Dana

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Apr 3, 2007
Messages
9,131
Location
CT, USA
Years ago I went up in my T-Craft when I no doubt shouldn't have, then the wind picked up even more. Fortunately the runway was straight into the wind. I don't know what my landing roll was but the tailwheel never passed the point where the mains touched, then I sat there for a moment wondering what do do next. A couple of the guys at the ultralight operation on the other side of the field (it sure must have been a "drinking day" for them!) ran over, one said, "what is that, an ultralight in disguise?", they grabbed my wing struts and helped me back to my tiedown spot.
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
7,890
Location
USA.
One day on my job I had a ground speed of 245 mph in a Cessna 172 with the wind on my tail at 3K. Needed to land for fuel. 4k long runway and turned base as I entered downwind. Still had about one mile final. At WOT I was not moving. Camera operator ask if we were every going to get over this corn field. I told him I was going to get down close to the corn and see if I can get any ground speed and maybe we can get to the runway. Landing within its own length like a Helicopter. That was the easy part, the hard part was getting it off the runway dirty side down. Flew 11.5 hours that day. The pay was very good.

Watched my old instructor in the Piper Super Cub take off and fly for 20 minutes and never past the end of the runway. He would get to the end and back up to the beginning of the runway several times and then landed at the beginning of the runway.
 

Marc W

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
390
Location
Colorado
The wind wasn't quite that strong when Henry did his takeoff. He said the wind was gusting 15 to 20 mph. Not exactly a hurricane.
 
2
Top