Steel parts finishing

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Scottiniowa

Active Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2021
Messages
44
Location
Clarksville, Iowa
Having painted many frames, with most of the listed above products, with great results, I would be one of the first to say, most GOOD products, applied correctly work well. This "applied correctly" part is key. But most of you know that.

But, and there always seems to be a "but" I can't get out of my head the system I saw at OSH this year,

HIPEC Aircraft Coatings | High Performance Aircraft Coatings & Fabric Aircraft Coverings

But simply can't find one single person that has used it. When I asked why that would be? I was told that it simply has not been promoted ever in the USA, can that be the reason? is it popular in Canada? IS it as good as it looks? can it really be as light as they say? Feed back folks?
I guess no one has ever used or heard of this company? no opinions are rare these days.. ;-)
 
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Jan 3, 2014
Messages
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Location
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Is there a reason that you do not want to use an epoxy primer, then paint black over it?

In my original post I mentioned I would prefer to use the material I have on hand. I don’t need to buy I wanted to.

I like black as a color, that’s my goal. I have hundreds in PPG material I’d like to use up. Given the responses and the research I’ve been doing the last couple days I decided to not use what I have.
 
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I appreciate everyone’s reply. Thank you.

After reading the responses and doing research on my own the last couple of days, I decided it’s best to not use anything I have in my shop and just decide on a paint “system” and follow the protocol from the company.

I like these 3 in this order……

1.) Superflight
2.) Stewart System
3.) Polyfiber system

I am currently on vacation in Key West and just studying the 3 systems.

Between the 3 the one thing that bothers me most is the trouble various people experience when spraying Stewarts. That has really given people some issues.
 
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TFF

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Apr 28, 2010
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17,925
Location
Memphis, TN
Stewart’s can look great. It’s a product that will allow fabric planes to be flown after the solvent based stuff is outlawed some day. It’s good that it’s around. The solvent stuff is nasty for health and environment, but I’m also a traditionalist. The top coat of Stewart is health nasty while wet, but once cured it’s not like all the modern car paints. Anything with a hardener is dangerous when wet and a mist. Superflite gets to skip the silver coat, so less work. Polyfiber Polytone is the easiest. Randthane is easier to spray than Aerothane. Supposedly Superflite is like Randthane.

I believe Kevin Kimball uses Delfleet Aviation FDXH over Polyfiber for his show planes. I think there is an industrial version too.

If I ever do another and Dope is available, that’s what I’m using. It won’t be the shiniest, but it will be the last of the originals.
 
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West Coast Air Creations uses Polyfiber, I reached out to them. They produce some very classy airplanes.
 

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Joined
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I reached out to Rare Aircraft and they use Superflight.

I reached out to the Air Tech owner and he is a very nice and accommodating guy. Very impressed with that company as well.
 

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TerryM76

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Tempe, AZ
As you stated, the fuselage gets covered up so why not use your supply of paint on all the steel components? What‘s the worst thing that could happen? The PPG paints that I have seen in the past is hard as glass and your steel components should be well protected by using it. I wouldn’t hesitate if it was my project.
 

Pops

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I learned a lesson about restoring an airplane as a show piece. The 1959 Cessna 172 that I restored is in a museum in Germany. Sold it about 2 years after finishing it. To nice to fly. Put towels down on the carpeting in front of the front seats and took my shoes off and placed on a towel layed down on the carpet forward of the rear seats . After flying it took about 2 hrs of work getting all the bug splatters, dust, etc off and back to perfect condition. Then there was the job of keeping the polished aluminum looking new. Kept the airplane in a heated/AC hanger covered with blankets over the paint and polished aluminum.
That is the reason I built the SSSC, painted with a roller with SW house paint. Built to NOT be a show piece but to use everyday. When I taxi down the grass field runway and its wet and water and mud gets slung under the wings, I just smile and enjoy the flight. The mud will fall off when it get dry enough.
 
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I learned a lesson about restoring an airplane as a show piece. The 1959 Cessna 172 that I restored is in a museum in Germany. Sold it about 2 years after finishing it. To nice to fly. Put towels down on the carpeting in front of the front seats and took my shoes off and placed on a towel layed down on the carpet forward of the rear seats . After flying it took about 2 hrs of work getting all the bug splatters, dust, etc off and back to perfect condition. Then there was the job of keeping the polished aluminum looking new. Kept the airplane in a heated/AC hanger covered with blankets over the paint and polished aluminum.
That is the reason I built the SSSC, painted with a roller with SW house paint. Built to NOT be a show piece but to use everyday. When I taxi down the grass field runway and its wet and water and mud gets slung under the wings, I just smile and enjoy the flight. The mud will fall off when it get dry enough.

I still want to do my best work because it doesn’t take any more effort, all things considered. I’m not looking to win awards but I do want it to be nice looking. I don’t mind cleaning.

I completely understand the group of guys who want to use house paint, just not my thing I guess.
 

Geraldc

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Nov 12, 2011
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873
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nz
Asked local Aircraft maintenance guy.They use 2 pack epoxy on all airframes and cover with Polyfiber.
He prefers white on steel tubing as cracks show up better.
Rans fuselages were powder coated.
 

Pops

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I still want to do my best work because it doesn’t take any more effort, all things considered. I’m not looking to win awards but I do want it to be nice looking. I don’t mind cleaning.

I completely understand the group of guys who want to use house paint, just not my thing I guess.
Its not about the effort in building. But, if you build something so perfect that it hinders you from using it , is where it becomes a problem for me.
The C-172 had been put in long term storage ( 40+ years) by a Cessna dealer. Taken out of storage and sold to a man that died a short time later and I bought it from the widow. Believed it's the best straight tail C-172 in the world. Also had all the factory ads and brochures. It needed to be in a museum.
Log books 7 pages each. Inspected and flown a little for those 7 years total.
I don't want anything that nice again.
 
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Its not about the effort in building. But, if you build something so perfect that it hinders you from using it , is where it becomes a problem for me.
The C-172 had been put in long term storage ( 40+ years) by a Cessna dealer. Taken out of storage and sold to a man that died a short time later and I bought it from the widow. Believed it's the best straight tail C-172 in the world. Also had all the factory ads and brochures. It needed to be in a museum.
Log books 7 pages each. Inspected and flown a little for those 7 years total.
I don't want anything that nice again.
That’s not my story here, I’m not looking for perfect, like I say I just want gloss and I do a good job at everything I do. I plan on flying the hell out of this airplane. 👍
 

Yellowhammer

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Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Do not powder coat. Hard and brittle and will crack and rust under the coating.

The best is Poly-Fiber epoxy primer. Far as I know it doesn't come in black. Number 2 is Dupont Variprime , also two part and I have bought it in black. Sticks as good as Poly-Fiber epoxy primer but without a top coat it will not hold up to the elements quite as good a PF primer. It's one or the other and nothing else for me.
Can buy at your local Dupont auto paint store.

Picture is my LG primed with Poly Fiber epoxy primer without a top coat that was painted in 2006. Has seen a lot of mud and water with not ever been on a paved runway over a few times. Now the green is a little darker green as you can see on the fiberglass ends on the shock strut farings.


Pops,

What is the best epoxy primer for my composite airplane? I am not sure what to buy. I am getting close to needing it though. I am in the process of filling and feathering the fuselage.

Thanks for your help.

-Yellowhammer
 
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