started soaring lessons today

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rbrochey

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I really don't know the difference between just soaring and soaring with a motor glider but it seems to me a motor glider would be a little less demanding? I don't know so please tell me I don't know what I'm talking about... I am sending away for the plans for this one, however. Guess I'll have a lot to learn.

EEL ULF-2

ulf-2_01_L.jpg
 
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BJC

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i gather that would be NC25? i've driven thru gold hill a couple of times, never would have guessed there's an airfield.
Correct, NC25. It is a residential air park. My friend has a house there where he spends the weekends when he isn't flying for a living.

If you choose to fly there, note that the runway is 30 feet wide and has uphill and downhill banks in places.


BJC
 

TFF

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The extra demand on a motor glider is the engine might not start after soaring, so you don't want to be in a bad situation that you need a motor. I have a chuckle head friend who ran one out of gas while giving a ride. It did not hurt the important parts of the plane, but he had decided to stick it in a plowed field and not an untraveled road. Busted up the pants and could have nosed it over; all to hide the plane until help arrived. With the motor running, you have a long wing docile airplane. With it off, you better know how to soar.
 

BJC

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Congrats.

It's on my list for some day ...
“Some day” came today.

A group of residents here who formed a club last year were flying their two gliders. I wandered down to the runway and got a flight with a friend / neighbor / instructor in their 2-33. He flew the takeoff, but I flew everything from about 400 AGL. I released from the O-540 Pawnee at 2,500 and headed to an area where a Kitfox was soaring. Arrived there at about 1,700 and circled in one thermal, then moved over to a better one, and climbed back to 2,500. Flew back to the airport, entered a standard pattern at 1,100, then landed.

Initial impressions of my first flight in a glider:
We probably were at the forward CG limit. Either that of the 2-33 needs a bigger horizontal stabilizer and elevator.
Control response has considerable dead time that I am not accustomed to.
Once through the dead time, control response is extremely slow.
Getting a reasonable roll or yaw response takes massive control movements.
The spoilers were less effective than I had imagined that they would be.
The 2-33 will slip, but it doesn’t like full rudder slips with spoilers extended; it really shakes.
My intent was to land about 2/3 of the way down the 3,700 foot runway. The float that I anticipated did not happen, and I landed about half way down the runway. Judging the touchdown and the rollout were easy.

Lots of fun.


BJC
 

Jay Kempf

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Congrats. Nothing like that first pop of the tow rope leaving and than that calm feeling of not worrying about the motor anymore.
 
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Jay Kempf

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“Some day” came today.

A group of residents here who formed a club last year were flying their two gliders. I wandered down to the runway and got a flight with a friend / neighbor / instructor in their 2-33. He flew the takeoff, but I flew everything from about 400 AGL. I released from the O-540 Pawnee at 2,500 and headed to an area where a Kitfox was soaring. Arrived there at about 1,700 and circled in one thermal, then moved over to a better one, and climbed back to 2,500. Flew back to the airport, entered a standard pattern at 1,100, then landed.

Initial impressions of my first flight in a glider:
We probably were at the forward CG limit. Either that of the 2-33 needs a bigger horizontal stabilizer and elevator.
Control response has considerable dead time that I am not accustomed to.
Once through the dead time, control response is extremely slow.
Getting a reasonable roll or yaw response takes massive control movements.
The spoilers were less effective than I had imagined that they would be.
The 2-33 will slip, but it doesn’t like full rudder slips with spoilers extended; it really shakes.
My intent was to land about 2/3 of the way down the 3,700 foot runway. The float that I anticipated did not happen, and I landed about half way down the runway. Judging the touchdown and the rollout were easy.

Lots of fun.


BJC
The 2-33 is a bit of a pig. But it is super strong and honest ( I grew up around Horseheads, NY and new guys that welded and bucked rivets at the factory). If you think it doesn't have any roll rate you probably shouldn't try a 20 meter open class ship with a ton of water spread spanwise :) You get a pass due to having been spoiled by a Pitts! And you could have flown the takeoff. Nothing compared to the Pitts. My 14th birthday my mom made me a cake shaped and colored like the 2-33 I soloed in complete with N number. I was pissed off at the time. Hated birthdays.

2-33 slips are noisy but easy to control and you can drop like a stone if done right. Comes in handy if you end up in one of <from Quebecois> "dose hat suckers eh?" :) Full rudder puts a lot of flat fuselage sideways. You have to put the nose and a wing tip in deep to keep it all tracking down the intended line. Gives a nice unobstructed view of the threshold out the side of the canopy. I used to do the same in a 152 when I was learning power and the instructor didn't approve...

Love hearing about first glider flights. So long ago for me and I was so young. Brings back all kinds of warm fuzzy memories.
 
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Victor Bravo

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Congratulations! Welcome to the Dark Side :) There is no going back... we control the horizontal, we control the vertical :)

The 2-33 is what most all of us learned on, and yes you always find yourself hitting the aft stop with the control stick when flying dual. When you "graduate" to the 1-26 or any of the European gliders that will mostly go away. What other glider do they have available in addition to the old T-bird?

Everything has slow controls compared to a Pitts, of course. Roll rate is not exactly the main attraction of sailplanes.
 
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mcrae0104

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BJC
Did you wear a funny hat and everything?

Just kidding--I'm a little envious. Good for you.
 
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BJC

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What other glider do they have available in addition to the old T-bird?
It is a single seat glass airplane, I don’t know exactly; I haven’t seen it up close.

Did you wear a funny hat and everything?
I did wear a hat, a new one to replace the old straw one that has been held together with RTV for that past few Sun n Funs and Oshkoshes. However, it is not one of those sailplane pilot hats like Bob Denver is modeling, above.

VB, did you know Bob Denver?

All in all, it was a fun experience.


BJC
 

Victor Bravo

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Oooohhh... balsa wood core composite sandwich - in Florida. Make sure your club has qualified eyes to look at that every year. Perfectly good sailplane for the light soaring conditions in FL, but it was a "first generation" glass glider. 1960's technology, some or all of them had balsa cores between the glass skins.

I never flew the Phoebus, but I do remember they were kinda short, cramped cockpits. We had a local sports class competitor named Mike Green, call sign "Mighty Gorilla", he was a fairly well fed guy and it was fun watching him fold himself in and out of that Phoebus :)
 
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BJC

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Years ago, while taxiing for takeoff, I had to yield the right-of-way to a hot air balloon. Today I had to abort a downwind for a glider that was determined to land on the runway. For some reason, he wasn’t willing fo fly out and get in line behind me.


BJC
 

Bille Floyd

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...
Today I had to abort a downwind for a glider that was determined to land on the runway. For some reason, he wasn’t willing fo fly out and get in line behind me.


BJC
LOL ; That was Funny !! :)
 

Jay Kempf

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Oooohhh... balsa wood core composite sandwich - in Florida. Make sure your club has qualified eyes to look at that every year. Perfectly good sailplane for the light soaring conditions in FL, but it was a "first generation" glass glider. 1960's technology, some or all of them had balsa cores between the glass skins.

I never flew the Phoebus, but I do remember they were kinda short, cramped cockpits. We had a local sports class competitor named Mike Green, call sign "Mighty Gorilla", he was a fairly well fed guy and it was fun watching him fold himself in and out of that Phoebus :)
Used to crew on a Phoebus. Tricky to rig depending on Temp and humidity. For instance if wings were out in the sun but fuse was still under the shade of the trailer lid. German guy owned it. I was 14 or 15 at the time and I was one of the only ones he would let help cause I guess I developed the knack early... Used to ride along to help on out landings if they happened. That was in mythical land called Harris Hill many epochs ago. Beautiful bird to be up close and personal with when you were that young and impressionable.
 

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