Standard Instrument Configurations ?

Discussion in 'Instruments / Avionics / Electrical System' started by ebonheart_2, Jan 26, 2006.

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  1. Mar 15, 2006 #21

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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    Hmmm.... I personally do not like the EFIS stuff (glass cockpit).. and they're really expensive.

    Your right about touching the instruments, although I wasnt planning on having very many instruments that need adjusting and stuff... but that does make since, that your engine instruments could be some place else because you normally dont need to mess with em'. :)
     
  2. Mar 15, 2006 #22

    Craig

    Craig

    Craig

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    Instruments

    James -

    I rarely touch instruments. Having said that, yesterday evening I noticed that most pilots, when they sit in a cockpit, instinctively reach for and set the altimeter - without even thinking about it.

    And I do touch the radio and transponder.

    I fly from the rear 'pit in a tandem airplane, and am therefore more limited in panel space than a side-by-side airplane.

    I have the flight instuments directly in front of me - altimeter, airspeed, T/C, VSI, gyro horizon.

    As I am right-handed, the radio is to the right, as are most of the major switches (main, alt, starter/mags, various lights). The flap switch is directly in front of the stick - I can reah up with a thumb or finger and move it without removing my hand from the stick.

    Engine instruments are largely on the left, in front of the side-mounted throttle and mixture levers. Carb heat and boost pump are here also.

    As I power my gyro horizon via a venturi, I do have a suction gage - it is waaay on the right, as I rarely look at it. It is mainly filling an empty hole caused by switching from a MicroAir transponder to a King, which is mounted under the center of the panel.

    Oddly, trim is mounted on the right. I say odd, because I use it to eliminate stick pressure, and have to switch hands to adjust the trim. Fortunately, it is pretty effective.

    I fly "head up" most of the time, so the GPS is located by my left thigh - glance at it once in a great while, but normally navigate by locating a point in front of me and flying to it. Mostly use it to check groundspeed and drift (course heading vs. aircraft heading).

    As you fly more, you will develop personal preferences - don't be afraid to set up you panel the way you want it - you are the pilot of your airplane.

    Oh - and the compass? It is mounted on the underside of the wing, just above my vision line. A vertical card, it works almost better than a gyro compass! My buddy Bob, with the same type plane, doesn't even have a compass - but he did not know that until I pointed it out to him! Does have a panel-mounted GPS, tho, which does give him course headings.

    Good luck with YOUR panel - make sure it is what YOU want. And I agree with you about glass cockpits (don't like them, too expensive), but they would look funny in my open-cockpit flying machine! The price is coming down, the utility and function going up, however, and if I ever build that type of airplane, I might switch!
     
  3. Mar 28, 2006 #23

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

    ebonheart_2

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    Cool Craig, but any plane I may design, I would like it to be able to be made without having to be modified or anything... so I'll haved to arrange the instruments into a "standard" pattern and then figure out where the best place for the rest of the instruments are based on the plane, and its panel. :)

    I'd like to design something that would be plans built.
     

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