Stalls

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Shrimphead

Active Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
26
I was wondering if stalls are caused by having too great an angle of attack, then what does speed have to do with it, and what is the stall speed of a plane?
Thanks
 

Shrimphead

Active Member
Joined
Jul 28, 2005
Messages
26
so im gonna use the affordaplane for example. According to it's site, it's stall speed is 27 mph. Would the plane stall if the chord was horizontal to the wind, but the engine was running slow enough to only be going about 27 mph?
thanks again
 

CriCriOz

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2005
Messages
67
Location
Sydney Australia
stalls result in Angle of Attack being too high and resulting in the breakaway of clean airflow over the wings. and can happen at all speeds

if you keep the plane level, and reduce power and speed, the aircraft will begin to decend as there will no longer be enough lift to support the aircrafts weight, but if you try to hold it level and reduce power and speed, then you have to increase angle of attack to creat more lift, and there will come a point where the angle of attack will reach the stall point, usually around 16 deg, the airflow will break away from the upper surface and the plane will stall. its this type of stall they refer to in performance charts. increasing weight will increase stall speed as more lift will be required to support the extra weight.

High speed stalls are common on turns on final approach and during aerobatic manuvers, where the aircraft is travelling faster than the "stall"speed. but during the turn the wing outside the turn has a greater angle of attack than the inside wing and can excedd the stall angle, causing a spin, a similar situation occurs on take off, so turns in climb attitude are limited to rate 1 turns only in most cases.

stalls during aerobatics occur usually at the bottom or during dives, even though you are moving a lot faster than the stall speed, pulling back too fast will cause the wings to quickly reach the stall Angle and ecxeed it, causing a stall, and the dive to continue, sometimes straight into the ground. this happens sometimes at air shows.
 
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