Song inspired by airplane crash

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kent Ashton

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Not a crash but I always found the theme from "The High and The Mighty" to be quite memorable. A great aviation movie based on the Ernest K. Gann novel. It always chokes me up when the Duke nurses that DC-4 into San Fran with the theme in the background.
 

Appowner

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Mar 30, 2021
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Michigan
Not a crash necessarily. But I have always preferred the theme from the Twelve O'Clock High TV series. Though the opening to the movie is somewhat moving as well.

12 O'Clock High

And if one insists, a crash was definatley involved in the making of this song.

American Pie
 

wktaylor

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Midwest USA
As an aircraft mishap investigator I can barely hold the emotions back when I hear James Taylor's song Fire and Rain... for the last 30+ years. I wouldn't call it a favorite... it is something deeper than that. I can sing every word... and emotion... with 'him' [or who-ever is singing]. Even my wife cannot fully grasp the emotional meaning of that song to me.

The pain of sudden and catastrophic loss of an irreplaceable life is palpable. I have seen it in the eyes of the deceased crew's fellow pilots, friends and relatives... and wives [it was a man's world in the 80's and 90'].

In those times, I learned as an investigator to remain silent and move on. Letting the 'survivors' have space, without my serious/analytical observations and words-of-no-comfort, was tough but necessary part of the business. AND NEVER ATTEMPT ANY HUMOR... jokes are rarely if ever appreciated and simply deepen pain and provoke contempt.

There have even been injured survivors I've met who will never be the same.

‘What doesn’t kill You makes You stronger’... is a fairy tale... ‘What doesn’t kill You changes You, for better-or-worse’.” –paraphrased, unknown
 

Riggerrob

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There are several parachuting related "crash" songs.
American paratroopers wrote "Blood Upon the Risers" many years ago.
There is also "You Picked A Fine time to Fail Me Reserve" coined by a Canadian skydiver circa 1980.
You picked a fine time to fail me reserve,
It's four hundred feet and I'm losing my nerve.
I've had some bad ones,
Lived through some sad ones,
but this one I just don't deserve.
You picked a fine time to fail me reserve.
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
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Location
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As an aircraft mishap investigator I can barely hold the emotions back when I hear James Taylor's song Fire and Rain... for the last 30+ years. I wouldn't call it a favorite... it is something deeper than that. I can sing every word... and emotion... with 'him' [or who-ever is singing]. Even my wife cannot fully grasp the emotional meaning of that song to me.

The pain of sudden and catastrophic loss of an irreplaceable life is palpable. I have seen it in the eyes of the deceased crew's fellow pilots, friends and relatives... and wives [it was a man's world in the 80's and 90'].

In those times, I learned as an investigator to remain silent and move on. Letting the 'survivors' have space, without my serious/analytical observations and words-of-no-comfort, was tough but necessary part of the business. AND NEVER ATTEMPT ANY HUMOR... jokes are rarely if ever appreciated and simply deepen pain and provoke contempt.

There have even been injured survivors I've met who will never be the same.

‘What doesn’t kill You makes You stronger’... is a fairy tale... ‘What doesn’t kill You changes You, for better-or-worse’.” –paraphrased, unknown
All valid points about dealing with the emotions of survivors. The general public lacks the first clue on how to talk to PTSD sufferers. Personal injury lawyers understand the healing process even less.
Now you guys have challenged me to write a song about the airplane crash that I survived in 2008.
 

Riggerrob

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Here goes my first attempt at song-writing. ... sung to the tune of "The Gambler" by Kenny Rogers ...

On a warm summer's evening,
on a plane bound for twelve grand,
We were all too tired to belt in,
so we took turns staring out the window at the clouds,
'til fatigue overtook it and the fuel pump failed.

You got to know when to belt in and when to bail,
Know when you can walk away and know when to run,
You never leave your belt on jump-plane floor,
There'l be time enough to un-belt when you're above 2 grand.

In a mad display of skill, the pilot shoved the nose down,
then he declared a 'mergency and turned towards home.

As my altimeter unwound madly,
I quit staring out the window as my world faded to gray
I hunched my shoulders and said to myself
"This is going to hurt."

On a warm summer evening, in field outside the 'Pitt,
I was sitting in an ambulance, too tired to sleep,
so I stared out the door at a plane laying on its belly,
and I realized that we had survived

Son, I've made a lifetime of skydiving round the world,
jumping tween the alps and landing in the dust.
For a loan of your pull-up-cord, I'll give you some advice.
You never count on the airplane climbing or your last pack job opening,
There'l be time enough for un-belting when you're above two grand.

Please feel free to add lyrics.
 

SpruceForest

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May 23, 2022
Messages
240
Jumped every chance I got… always happy to be first or last off the ramp,or out the door
on a Hollywood water jump or packing night combat equipment. No such thing as a perfect airplane, right? Should do the free fall thing as a bucket list item but have to wait on rotator cuff repair (CE jump at Benning… weapons carrier under left arm for PLF… rookie mistake… ignored it to stay on flight and jump status). All my youthful indiscretions coming back to haunt me.

Hey…there could be a song in there…
 

SpruceForest

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May 23, 2022
Messages
240
Riggerbob said: Now you guys have challenged me to write a song about the airplane crash.

ok…thinking the line ‘(the) One You Can Walk Away From Is A Good One’… if it’s country, make the first chorus or two ‘any one you can walk away from is a good one’ and the final chorus (the one where you usually either lose or get your dog/truck/saddle back) inject some romance and pathos in the song and use ‘(the) one you can’t walk away from is the only one.’ Figure the extra beat can get eaten up by going all a cappella at the end.
 
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