Solvent for dried linseed oil?

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Sprucemoose

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Does anyone know of a good solvent to remove dried linseed oil residue? I have a set of non-sealed Cub struts that I need to cut down and re-weld for my project. They are heavily coated with what appears to be boiled linseed oil residue on the inside, and I want to remove that material from the weld area before welding.
 

Head in the clouds

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Does anyone know of a good solvent to remove dried linseed oil residue? I have a set of non-sealed Cub struts that I need to cut down and re-weld for my project. They are heavily coated with what appears to be boiled linseed oil residue on the inside, and I want to remove that material from the weld area before welding.
We were discussing corrosion protection on another thread and this was posted.

Not sure what kind of 'light solvent' was used though but since linseed oil is a vegetable oil I'd probably try something alcohol based first or maybe WD40 or similar would work for the bulk strip and then perhaps methylated spirit for a final clean-up. Metho is used in french polishing furniture so it should dissolve linseed I would think.

You might also PM Rosco and see what he used.

Hope it helps.
 

TFF

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Heat it up with the torch and burn it out where the welding will be; then clean the weld area with emory cloth in and out. you are not going to be able to get a whole tube clean if that is what you want.
 

alpjumper

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Well Linseed oil contains large amounts of oxidized fatty acids. These have low solubility in non polar solvents such as WD 40 (water displacing oil formula #40) or alcohols such at methanol, acetone, etc.
I would try a solvent used for dissolving fatty acids like ordering online.. an amount of n-cyclohexane. BE VERY CAREFUL this stuff will ignite very easily.
Another option would be a toluene or xylene with a caustic solution. This I do not recommenced for non chemists.
 

Monty

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Well Linseed oil contains large amounts of oxidized fatty acids. These have low solubility in non polar solvents such as WD 40 (water displacing oil formula #40) or alcohols such at methanol, acetone, etc.
I would try a solvent used for dissolving fatty acids like ordering online.. an amount of n-cyclohexane. BE VERY CAREFUL this stuff will ignite very easily.
Another option would be a toluene or xylene with a caustic solution. This I do not recommenced for non chemists.
seeing as how I am also composed of a large amount of fatty acids, among other things, I think I would prefer the method TFF suggests: FIRE and LOTS OF IT!!! :roll: but not too much:eek:
 

alpjumper

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seeing as how I am also composed of a large amount of fatty acids, among other things, I think I would prefer the method TFF suggests: FIRE and LOTS OF IT!!! :roll: but not too much:eek:
Good point... Proper protection should be used when handling powerful chemicals. gas mask with activated carbon filter, lab grade black rubber gloves, smock etc... The polar solvents can be very toxic and can also cause hereditary genetic mutations. They can form toxic aldehydes in the blood as well.
Just saying it is easy if you are not opposed to some level of exposure, paint on wash off.
 

Sprucemoose

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Update- none of the solvents I had around worked worth squat (acetone, mineral spirits, laquer thinner, turpentine.) I found a little 3/4" wire wheel for a dremel tool at my local Aircraft Components and Equipment store that worked like a charm. I wasn't trying to remove all the residue from the tube, just 1/4" or so around the fish mouth so as not to contaminate the weld. I'll re-linseed the whole thing once it's finished (and painted!)

Thanks for the replies.
 

bmcj

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Just to test, try some charcoal lighter fluid. I know it works on cooked oils where other solvents have trouble.
 

Aesquire

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I was going to suggest mineral spirits...... which was a fail.

It works on Soviet era preservative goo used on military gear. Plus elbow grease.

I'll note wire wheel as the right answer in my tool kit, thanks.
 

NoStealth

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You might try sodium hydroxide based degreaser products - also degreases fingers - wear gloves&glasses - in oven-bbq cleaner, Zep industrial purple
 
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