Small block Chevy Ideal Setup

Discussion in 'Chevy' started by Streffpilot, Dec 9, 2011.

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  1. Feb 24, 2012 #161

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

    Toobuilder

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    There is a bunch more talk than action, for sure, but it’s not for lack of motivation on my part.

    I’d like to think I’m cautiously optimistic about auto engines. In that vein, I have a 3 step process to go from keyboard commando to flight hardware:

    1) Acquire a little 5.3 and prove that I can make it run with a standalone ignition (easy – off the shelf parts) and the Bendix mechanical fuel injection (harder, but parts fabrication is well along). If this works, go to step #2.

    2) Fabricate a prop drive, bolt it to the 5.3 and try break it on the ground. If data warrants, go to step #3.

    3) Build a flightworthy big inch LS and version 2.0 prop drive. If ground testing warrants, go fly.

    Currently, this is a back burner project, but I’m keeping my eyes out for the perfect (i.e. nearly free) test mule 5.3. When the project moves higher up to the top, I may have to bite the bullet and spend $400 bucks to buy the 5.3. At any rate, this course of action should allow me to test and verify my ideas without a significant risk. By the time I’m ready to lay out the cash for the “flight” engine, I should have a pretty good idea if this is going to work.
     
  2. Feb 24, 2012 #162

    GrizzlyV6

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    Toobuilder,
    You certainly are much more bold than I. I don't have the background to attempt to build a redrive from an engineering standpoint. I wish you much success. That being said is exactly why I followed those who have done the engineering and use their success. The BAP redrive manufactured for the chevy engine which is a very well engineered package, is now able to be installed on the Ford engine thanks to the work by Hasspowerair. Take a look at the engine mount on Ben's engine. I'm modifying his design for my project - WHY - because he's already done the engineering and we know that it works. The engine mount from the blanton conversion has a weak spot and is known to fail at a specific point. So, my BAP redrive with a modified Haaspower engine mount, I'm in good shape and moving forward. To all who are seriously considering using an autoconversion I say, go with what has already been engineered and we know that it works. At my age, I don't have time to experiment. I want to fly.


    Jim
     
  3. Feb 24, 2012 #163

    Toobuilder

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    Experimentation (knowledge) is half the fun. If I wanted to fly, I'd go with a Lycoming.
     
  4. Feb 24, 2012 #164

    GrizzlyV6

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    I simply don't know what to say to that!

    Enjoy,
    Jim
     
  5. Feb 25, 2012 #165

    bmcj

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    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    Sorry, can't speak with much knowledge about engines, but...



    :roll: Just about fell out of my chair laughing!
     
  6. Feb 25, 2012 #166
    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    My replies are meant to be factual discussion not argumentative, but I admit they end up sounding that way.
    :gig:


    Reply: Consumers would never put up with the type of service an airplane engine provides. They don't get good gas mileage,they use lots of oil, they are finiky to start, require frequent maintainance (compared to auto standards), and they run rough. If they were a good choice, the automotive companies would have emulated them and saved all that money they spent developing highly efficient engines.......then we would have cheap replacement parts.


    Continued: The bottom line is simply that an engine is an engine and it can be adapted to any purpose if good choices are made. When all the nay sayers finally see an outstanding auto conversion come along at a reasonable price, Lycoming and Continental will be in danger of closing their doors, because they can no longer hold people hostage like the oil companies do.
     
  7. Feb 25, 2012 #167
    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing Well, Bill......


    Well Bill, many of us have tried to exchange information, ideas, and opinions.....some good, some not so good. Personally I have enjoyed the exchange of opinions and information and have learned some things. Since You have chastised us and voiced your opinion of our exchanges, I would have to ask you "What have you contributed to this subject"?

    Jump on in here and contribute............
     
  8. Feb 25, 2012 #168

    GrizzlyV6

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    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing Well, Bill......

    Easssy there big fella, geeze, and they say I'm sensitive. I think Bill is as frustrated as I when someone wants to talk about auto conversions and without fail someone will start talking about continentals and lycomings and start making comparisons. The discussion was about sbc set up, not certifieds. If you or anyone else wants to fly a certified, do it and have a grand time. If you are going to fly an auto conversion or are seriously interested in the movement, come on in. BUT, the same ones with the same old lame argument gets tiring listening too. I don't think anyone using an auto conversion are wanting to argue with anyone about. We did our homework and proceeded. There seems to be an abundance of self proclaimed engineers of everything who have to tell us just how much they know about the topic, but have never flown so much as a sick pigeon on a string or have never built anything but have this wealth on knowledge on the subject.

    I understand where Bill is coming from. I get tired of hearing it too.


    Jim
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
  9. Feb 25, 2012 #169

    Dan Thomas

    Dan Thomas

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    Car engines CAN work in airplanes. Nobody's disputing that. The dispute arises when someone suggests that an LS engine can do the job better and cheaper than a Lycoming and it's really not all that difficult...

    I joined the EAA in 1972. 40 years ago. There were guys fooling with car engines then, too, determined that Lycomings and Continentals and Franklins were all dinosaurs and that a Chev or Ford would be much more suitable and way cheaper.

    I'm not an EAA member anymore, but the Sport Aviations I read don't have too many auto-powered airplanes in them. Surely, in 40 years someone should have come up with a workable conversion! After all, boats use these auto engines at full power all day, don't they? My boat did. A Chev 250-hp 283, running at full throttle much of the time, and getting ONE MILE PER GALLON doing it, at 45 MPH. Boat engines do work hard but you pay for it, and they also have two advantages that airplane engines do not: the boat engine gets cooled by stone-cold water from beneath the boat, and the engine can produce enormous power with such cooling capacity. The second advantage? It's not driving the large and heavy aircraft propeller that leads to so many harmonics problems. It's driving a marine transmission via a spring plate that drives a rotating mass with a tiny fraction of the angular momentum of the aircraft prop.

    History speaks. It's not easy nor cheap do develop a safe, reasonably light, marketable conversion. If it was, we wouldn't have the majority of homebuilts powered by aircraft engines. Maybe things will soon change, with the current crop of lightweight engines, but the engineering still has to be done and paid for by someone.

    I'd like to know how much Ben Haas spent on his conversion. It appears to work well, one man's attempt among hundreds. He is to be congratulated, and the rest of you need to know that he is a rare one.

    Dan
     
  10. Feb 25, 2012 #170

    GrizzlyV6

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    The defense rest.



    Jim
     
  11. Feb 25, 2012 #171

    stol

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    xxxx
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  12. Feb 25, 2012 #172

    fadec

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    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    This is unlikely, the majority of Lycoming and Continentals' sales are for certified aircraft which require certified engines, as do commercial operators. The certification and liability insurance requirements and costs mean that certified engines will always be expensive (unless the FAA and lawyers change their ways). This affects not just the engines but also the spare parts. Also be aware that to build a certified engine the design and manufacturing processes must also be certified, further increasing costs. Deriving a certified engine from the automotive world is no panacea - consider the prices of Centurion, Austro, Porsche and Trace engines. If Ben Haas got his engine certified and set up for mass production (assuming Fords lawyers didn't shut him down) I bet the retail price would be just as expensive. Another thing to consider is that once a Type Certificate has been issued, thats it, you're stuck with the design warts and all. If the automotive donar company changes their block casting to save a few cents in per unit production cost then you have to re-certify your engine - $$$$
     
  13. Feb 25, 2012 #173

    stol

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    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    xxxx
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2012
  14. Feb 25, 2012 #174
    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    Reply:
    If you do some checking you will find that the Rotax, Jibaru, etc have taken a sizeable bite out of the sales of Lycoming and Continental. Then there is the loss to Superiors share of the market when they produced both certified and noncertified engines. Because of that the major engine manufacturers have introduced engines which they hope can compete with engines designed for experimental airplanes. No, Lycoming is paying attention because they have already lost sizeable market shares. Also, the sales of certified airplanes are down so there is less need there also.

    As for certifying the conversions, I don't know of anyone looking to build certified automotive engines to compete with Lycoming. What I said is that if a viable alternative comes along and all of the Experimental market drys up, Lycoming will take a sizeable market hit. If all those RVs weren't
    driving the demand for Lycomings, they would be available a lot more cheaply. Yep, the Experimental market today is a major money maker for Lycoming, and if it drys up Lycoming will
    suffer...........
     
  15. Feb 25, 2012 #175
    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing

    Reply: Hello Ben, excellent video and lots to learn from you. I do have to admit that it gets a little tiring listening to opinions of why all this engine conversion stuff won't work. You are an excellent example of the fact that it can and does work. While not all engine conversions turn out successfully, there is no reason to feel that none of them can work either. I think the problem with many builders is that they either want something someone else has done the work on rather than having confidence they can work thru it like you did. Then they get bombarded with negativity and cave in for the aircraft engine. The one thing about all of this, is that when you land at a flyin, I'm sure you are always surrounded by curious and admiring onlookers............and a since of pride because you did it your way.

    Several years back an aquaintance of mine decided to get back in to street rodding. He needed an engine and tranny and was going to buy a 350/350 Chevy. I suggested he use an LT1 with the overdrive transmission because
    he could get a complete setup for $2200/$2500. It came with fuel injection,alum heads, roller cam, lots of power, and didn't need a rebuild. He could buy the 350 and by the time he bought alum heads,intake,carb, and rebuilt it he would have about the same money in it. All the naysayers warned him about the difficulties of putting a newer fuel injected engine in his car. He did it anyway. It did take a little head scratchin, but he got it done and learned a lot in the process. I'll never forget the look on his face when he returned to work on Monday morning after the Street Rod Nationals......Ear to Ear grin and all pumped up. It seems as all the cars with 350/350 combos had become common place, his was different........and he spent the whole weekend with people stopping to talk and admire his car. I imagine thats the same grin you get..............So enjoy being one of the few who are smart and brave enough to chase their own dream and not be disuaded.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 25, 2012
  16. Feb 25, 2012 #176

    dirk_D

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    If you have a lathe and mill, some cad, a calculator, some large alloy billets, a couple of old ford c4 auto transmissions this could all happen very cheaply.
    Still, the grams keep adding up to kilograms etc.
    The lycoming / continental argument is quite convincing.
     
  17. Feb 25, 2012 #177

    dirk_D

    dirk_D

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    Oh, i just remembered! Rod Hadfield casts a magnesium big block chevy which is a hit with all the cropdusters in australia, he sold up and moved to the states for a while, i dont know if it still is available.
     
  18. Feb 25, 2012 #178

    fadec

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    Re: Small block Chevy Ideal Setup Overthinking this thing


    I stand corrected.
     
  19. Feb 26, 2012 #179

    GrizzlyV6

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    Then go fly a continental or lycoming - You do have that freedom of choice down under don't you?


    Jim
     
  20. Feb 26, 2012 #180

    RJW

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    This sort of angry, anti-engineering attitude that I am seeing here and elsewhere is a bit frightening. It seems there are fewer and fewer who have any respect at all for others who have strengths they themselves do not possess. It’s a dangerous attitude. I’m a pretty good mechanic and a fair fabricator. I’m not a very good engineer. Most of what I do is maintain and modify the beautiful things that engineers create. I have nothing but respect and admiration for them.

    Rob
     

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