Single Tube Fuselage idea

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rotax618

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If you look at the Strojnik method of making wing skins, he lays up glass/epoxy on a waxed mylar sheet, after it has started to set but while it is still rubbery, the mylar/glass is pulled over a wing shaped former and allowed to cure. This is done in roughly metre wide sections - removing the mylar leaves a smooth, shiny surface.
 

Sockmonkey

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If you look at the Strojnik method of making wing skins, he lays up glass/epoxy on a waxed mylar sheet, after it has started to set but while it is still rubbery, the mylar/glass is pulled over a wing shaped former and allowed to cure. This is done in roughly metre wide sections - removing the mylar leaves a smooth, shiny surface.
That does simplify things a lot build-wise. Would make repairs easy. Just keep a couple extra sections around to replace the damaged ones. Ideal for strut farings too.
 

karmarepair

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Junior plans are available.
Source information?

One thing that worries me is the blunt trailing edge of the cabin, close to the prop. Blunt MAY be better than a too short fairing, but my concern is both blockage of flow into the prop, and vortices from the cabin, alternating sides, disturbing both flow into the prop and into the vertical stabilizer. Remember that composite biplane amphib? Sea Hawk/Sea Hawker/Glass Goose...flow separation off the aft end of the cabin made the thing almost un-flyable until somebody got the idea of putting VGs on the side of the fuselage, which stabilized the boundary layer in that area. Several articles in Sport Aviation on that mess. The blunt back of this Russian design MAY be acting like a "Kamm back" with the low pressure zone keeping the boundary layer in front of the sharp corner thin and stable, and the resulting wake relatively short. I'll have to look at a CGS Hawk and see if it has the same detail, Chuck knew what he was doing and there are certainly a lot of them flying. JUST CHECKED, the CGS Hawk has a relatively long taper at the aft end of the cabin.
 

challenger_II

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I bought them from the gent that built the aircraft. I have since seen them advertised on the net.


Source information?

One thing that worries me is the blunt trailing edge of the cabin, close to the prop. Blunt MAY be better than a too short fairing, but my concern is both blockage of flow into the prop, and vortices from the cabin, alternating sides, disturbing both flow into the prop and into the vertical stabilizer. Remember that composite biplane amphib? Sea Hawk/Sea Hawker/Glass Goose...flow separation off the aft end of the cabin made the thing almost un-flyable until somebody got the idea of putting VGs on the side of the fuselage, which stabilized the boundary layer in that area. Several articles in Sport Aviation on that mess. The blunt back of this Russian design MAY be acting like a "Kamm back" with the low pressure zone keeping the boundary layer in front of the sharp corner thin and stable, and the resulting wake relatively short. I'll have to look at a CGS Hawk and see if it has the same detail, Chuck knew what he was doing and there are certainly a lot of them flying. JUST CHECKED, the CGS Hawk has a relatively long taper at the aft end of the cabin.
 

cluttonfred

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That one reminds me of the unbuilt Livesey D.L.5, a British design intended to be an even easier to build but better performing Volksplane. Note the Ercoupe-like wing bracing with diagonal ribs and other interesting design choices like the half-cowling that Leonard Milholland would like and the laminate landing gear bow like many French designs including those of Emilien Croses. That was in wood, but it's easy to imagine one in aluminum using a round boom or perhaps a rounded-corner square one built-up from sheet aluminum and pop rivets so as not to be dependent on a particular supplier for just the right specifications of boom.

livesey dl5 from wooden wonders.JPG livesey dl5 3-view.jpg livesey dl5 cutaway.jpg

A little something for erkki.
 

Dillpickle

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That one reminds me of the unbuilt Livesey D.L.5, a British design intended to be an even easier to build but better performing Volksplane. Note the Ercoupe-like wing bracing with diagonal ribs and other interesting design choices like the half-cowling that Leonard Milholland would like and the laminate landing gear bow like many French designs including those of Emilien Croses. That was in wood, but it's easy to imagine one in aluminum using a round boom or perhaps a rounded-corner square one built-up from sheet aluminum and pop rivets so as not to be dependent on a particular supplier for just the right specifications of boom.

View attachment 113048 View attachment 113049 View attachment 113050
Or....there are plans for this still available. Might have to be upscaled 10 percent for Erikk. I always thought the guys in love with The Janowsky style could put a fiberglass fairing on this too....https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerosport_Rail
 

rotax618

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With reference to the Junior rear fuselage, being blunt is not a problem at the speeds it flies. The CFM Shadow and Streak Shadow had a flat rear bulkhead in front of the pusher prop, you get problems with tapered fuselage at certain crytical angles - I had to solve that problem with my Boorabee aircraft.
825BA903-3305-4FED-B505-FCB301735611.jpeg
 
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