Short Field 175TD

HomeBuiltAirplanes.com

Help Support HomeBuiltAirplanes.com:

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
240
Yes and that is a part of what makes them a great bush plane.
You won’t cry as hard if you dent
one.
I’d love to find one of these as a hanger queen with the seaplane prop.
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,241
I think a lot of people look at these on paper and are fooled.
With the high centerline for the propeller, the higher horsepower and when loaded at a slightly lighter weight than gross they are Very capable bush planes.
Add on the current low price and they become even better for the job because they become essentially a throwaway
Learn to fly. Buy an airplane and see that we were right all along. Experience matters. A lot. Old, cheap airplanes are, pretty much without exception, holes to pour money into.
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
240
OK I’m willing to take that advice.
Would you happen to know where I could buy one of these old cheap airplanes?
Perhaps a 175 with a seaplane prop preferably that has been stored inside a heated hanger for the last 10 years since it flew right after an overhaul?

I’d like to do some off airport flying and I am not comfortable with a tail dragger
So what’s not to like about a 175?
 

Dan Thomas

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2008
Messages
5,241
OK I’m willing to take that advice.
Would you happen to know where I could buy one of these old cheap airplanes?
Perhaps a 175 with a seaplane prop preferably that has been stored inside a heated hanger for the last 10 years since it flew right after an overhaul?

I’d like to do some off airport flying and I am not comfortable with a tail dragger
So what’s not to like about a 175?
You still need to learn to fly first.

What's not to like? Well, just try buying parts for it, for one. They were all made between 1958 and 1962. How many '58-'62 cars can you think of that parts are still available for? And there are still thousands of old cars of that vintage around, while only 2100 of the 175s were built. More than 50,000 172s were built.

Like I said, experience matters. I worked for years maintaining a flight school fleet, buying parts for 1970s airplanes. No fun. And that was for models of which many, many thousands had been built. Then I worked for a Cessna dealer and had to try to find parts for much older airplanes. Even less fun. Sometimes you have to have them built. Sometimes the part is one that is simply not available and cannot be built so easily. Certain forgings and castings come to mind. Even if you have really deep pockets, you still need the manufacturer's design data--metallurgy and all--to make a part legally. And they don't give that out easily at all.

I remember some sad instances where a buyer bought a "cheap" old airplane. By the time it was airworthy he could have bought one far newer and in better shape for less money overall. And been flying sooner.

Wishful thinking has bankrupted too many newbies.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
7,065
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
I’d like to do some off airport flying and I am not comfortable with a tail dragger
So what’s not to like about a 175?
The 175 failed as a commercial product because it was NOT suited for the same type of flying that the 172 is so good at. One of those things the 172 is good at is surviving the rigorous use for pilot training and early time-building. The 175 engine's gearbox will just not stand for that very well.

Off-airport flying (dirt roads, dry lake beds, grass strips) is one thing. Rough field operation (river rocks, sand bars, mud bogs, plowed fields) is another thing altogether. Daily working bush flying is another thing. On and off the throttle, back-loading the engine, shock cooling... that's yet another thing.

If your definition of off-airport flying is dirt strips and grass meadows, with mostly straight and level flight between them, the 175 is just fine for that.

But if you want to get your license, which involves a lot of air-work, stalls, climbs and dives, touch an d go landings, etc. then I'm pretty confident the 175 is going to be a very expensive way to do that. Even if you buy one and fly it home for $15K.
 

Pilot-34

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
240
Yes it does seem like that gearbox greatly defines the suitable missions
 
Top