ShelterLogic Temporary Hanger (Pictures)

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by choppergirl, Dec 9, 2017.

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  1. Dec 11, 2017 #21

    Fred in Wisc

    Fred in Wisc

    Fred in Wisc

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    I used a similar structure (roof only, no walls) and it lasted about 5 or 6 years in Wisconsin. The key is to get it anchored securely. I also found that it was helpful to replace the bungee cords that hold the edges as they start to stretch (it won't shed son well and the top flutters if it's not taut). Also I ran 1/4" rope in tight diagonals in each rectangular roof space. It stiffens the structure a lot, and provides additional support to keep it from sagging as much with now load. After each snow, I'd go underneath it with a push broom and bounce the roof to make the snow slide off.
     
  2. Dec 18, 2017 #22

    trifoils

    trifoils

    trifoils

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    I set up a couple of the 10x15 hoop tents last year and they work great if you use the screw anchors, but will blow away in the wind without them (one met this fate early in its life). The tarp is a little thin but has lasted a year so far, aside from crow damage (which can be repaired - contact cement works well). Later I will replace the top with much thicker tarp and also do the same for my greenhouse frame. They are great storage shelters if you have a secure site that allows them. Zoning where I am doesn't even require a building permit for any size cloth shelter if it is for Ag use. The Air Force uses large industrial grade versions of these everywhere, and so do many of their contractors.
     

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  3. Dec 18, 2017 #23

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Hey Trifoils, that strip is lookin real good ! Congratulations ! Glad you're back in the air too.

    To everyone else on this thread, I would like to offer an only slightly off-topic idea for your consideration / experience:

    If you took two or three pieces of that corrugated fiberglass or metal "greenhouse panel" stuff that is available, and attached it over the top arch section of the temporary garage (using screws, pop rivets, baling wire, whatever), would that material provide enough of a stronger reinforcement and internal brace against snow loads and wind rippling?

    If installed on a curved roof shape like the round top garage, this stuff would become reasonably stiff. Attaching it with rivets or screws would also stiffen the structure a little in one or two directions. Then you put your tarp or fabric awning material over that, just like the original temp garage.

    My question is that this seems to make sense, and seems to offer some amount of additional rigidity, and seems to make the structure able to have fewer problems with snow loads. But I have precisely zero actual real-world experience with snow loads and temporary shelters. Lots of you guys live and build airplanes in cold weather, snow, etc. and I've never had to do that.

    Has anyone done this using this type of material? Does it work? It comes in plastic, fiberglass and galvanized steel.


    Skylite-frp-sheet-frp-corrugated-panel-translucent.jpg_350x350.jpg
     
  4. Dec 18, 2017 #24

    Pops

    Pops

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    In 1981, the grass field airport was closing where I was based. My fathers first cousin had a farm about 1.5 miles from my house that had a ridge top field 900' long. You could fly in at runway elevation on the south end. One way in and one way out. Owner said I could use the field for a couple of years if I wanted. He son and I grew up together and he cut me large white oak post from the woods beside the field. I build a 30' x 28' hanger,( 27' wing span). Bought some oak 2"X10" from a local saw mill and oak 2"x4" girts for the side walls. Found 2" steel gas pipe for 10 cents a foot for post under the beam set wide enough to get the tail in between. Got a good buy on rafters. Local old friend was tearing down a large barn the about to fall in and I got enough used metal roofing to cover the building for removal. Had $200 in the building and used the grass field for 2 years for free. The building is still standing today and used to store hay. I call that a win, win.
     
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  5. Dec 27, 2017 #25

    trifoils

    trifoils

    trifoils

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    Thanks, but I'm not in the air (my r/c models are, occasionally). Local pilots have seemed to notice the site and I've had a few visitors. Today it was a spotless RV8 in invasion stripes who buzzed the field and did a victory roll on the way back to town. It's amazing what you can get away with when you're over farm land.
     
  6. Dec 27, 2017 #26

    trifoils

    trifoils

    trifoils

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    Some farmers cover their hoop structures with metal if the tarp decays and I've considered it, but for now I will probably use metal sides with a tarp top, to let in light but keep out the rabbits. They will eat cacti out here if they're hungry enough so tender plants need a good barrier. The tarp can be replaced after a couple years.
     

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