Second Floor Air Compressor

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by Jman, Jan 11, 2009.

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  1. Jan 11, 2009 #1

    Jman

    Jman

    Jman

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    I'm working on getting my garage organized (just moved AGAIN) and I have a question for the group. I have a single stage air compressor and it's quite loud. We have a guest bedroom above the garage that only sees occasional use. I'm wondering if there is any problem with keeping the air compressor above the garage and running the line through the floor. Is this going to cause a significant amount of moisture to pool in the hose? I'm thinking no but I'm wrong more often than not so I'll ask you guys.

    I'm planning on just cutting a hole in the sub-floor and through the drywall in the ceiling of the garage. I'll maybe run a bit of PVC for the hose to ride inside of to prevent widening the drywall ceiling. Did I mention I'm renting this house? :ponder:

    - Jake
     
  2. Jan 11, 2009 #2

    Mad Man Mike

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    Put it anywhere you want to (unless its gas driven) moisture shouldnt be an issue--if it turns out to be one put a trap in the line to catch it--I had mine inside a shop for years with no problem --mine is now outsde due to space limitations -not a problem yet --though I drain the tanks of moisture every week or so, my compressor is off an old naval destroyer --and was made in 1942--it is a Stainless Steel tank with an old v-twin compressor--I had to replace the motor as the original was shot-- Ive had it since 1975 and will pass it on to my son in law when I pass on!
     
  3. Jan 11, 2009 #3

    Jman

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    That's a great heirloom Mike. Thanks for the comments. I couldn't think of any reason it would cause problems either but, then again, I'm no expert.

    I guess I'd better mount my regulator down in the garage too unless I want the extra exercise of running up the stairs every time I want to adjust my pressure.
     
  4. Jan 12, 2009 #4

    Midniteoyl

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    Its actually dryer in the house than outside, especially if your running the AC, so I wouldnt think you'd have a water problem to begin with.

    Why not snake it through the stud cavity? 2 little drywall holes to patch instead of a subfloor..
     
  5. Jan 12, 2009 #5

    Topaz

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    I'm with Midnite on this one - since you're renting, whatever way you run this should be something that you can spackle up easily and paint over when it's time to move again. If you're really careful, you might be able to run the (non-metallic!) line alongside an existing electrical line. Just takes a small opening next to each plug box, which you can patch, spackle, and paint when you leave. Patching a hole in the floor is going to be a bigger chore.

    As for water pooling at the end of the line - turn on the compressor, point the end out the garage door, and open the valve... The water should blow out in short order! :gig:

    Most compressor end-connectors that I've seen are bronze, so corrosion shouldn't be a problem. A trap like was mentioned above would fix it if you've got steel fittings.
     
  6. Jan 12, 2009 #6

    Midniteoyl

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    Course, you could do like me ... I havent drained mine since I got it in 1995 :)
     
  7. Jan 13, 2009 #7

    Jman

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    Hmmm.... Good idea. I'll need to poke around to see if I can thread that hose down there. I'm pretty sure there is going to be some insulation in the way. Thanks for the ideas guys.

    Jake
     
  8. Jan 13, 2009 #8

    Midniteoyl

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    Remove the baseboard, cut a 2-3" square from the floor up, drill a hole big enough for your hose through the subfloor in the stud cavity, go in the garage and cut a corresponding square from the ceiling down, snake the hose, tape up the holes. When you leave, you can cover the hole with the baseboard, and patch the one in the garage.

    If there's fiberglass, no worries. If its blown in, it will still stay in place long enough to bend some cardboard to hold it up.
     

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