Scattering Ashes?

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Dennis DeFrange

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Take um to a NASCAR race . Throw the bag out on the track right after the Green Flag , first car hits the bag and every intake gets a piece of the cake . That's how it's done .
 

Michael Silvius

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I have never done it myself, but have been told by those who regularly did, that they would use a hose hanging out the vent window and use the other end of the hose to vacuum the remains out of the box. Might be worth a test run with a couple pounds of cornmeal or sand first .
 

Riggerrob

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Here's another idea...a free-fall "bomb" consisting of two shells of papier-mâché with a simple mechanical "fuse" (rubber band powered or perhaps a little propeller turbine) in the nose that allows the two halves to split after a few seconds delay. Everything could still be natural and biodegradable.
You could also do that with a static-line.
One end of the static-line is anchored to a seat-belt fitting, while the other end is attached to the ash bag. When it falls to the end of the static-line, the cord rips the bag open.
Static-lines are traditionally slightly shorter than the distance from the anchor to the leading edge of the horizontal tail. This prevents the static-line from beating paint off of the tail or - even worse - jamming tail controls.
 

Riggerrob

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Dear Tiger Tim,
Your idea reminds me of the deployment sleeves that were fashionable when I started skydiving ... back during the 1970s.

A simplified version would work well for an ash dump.
Start by sewing up a miniature version of a sleeve, but only single layer. Old school sleeves were about 5 meters long (15 feet). Make it 30 to 50 cm wide (12 to 18 inches). Sew the usual assistor pockets to the top end. Assistor pockets are about the same size as a 36" pilot chute.
To load, stretch it out on the hangar floor and lay the ashes along the center line. Fold the side edges inwards, then roll it up from the bottom. Wrap a rubber band and plastic bag around it for the airplane ride.
Just before dumping altitude, remove the plastic bag and rubber band.
Toss it out the window.
It will be well past the tail before it unrolls enough to release ashes.
Can I get a patent for this idea?
 
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Tiger Tim

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That’s basically what I did but mine was narrower and carried just a small sample of ashes. The rubber band sorts itself out when the package goes overboard, btw.
 

reo12

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Jan 15, 2021
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I have seen this done using a 2 seat Quicksilver MXL. These are a pusher ul type plane. The passenger doing the release failed to ensure that the release was done as low and outside the aircraft as possible to prevent the prop from ingesting the ashes and bone fragments. The wood prop actually had some pea sized bone fragments impact the prop and disintegrate - partially imbedding in the prop. The leading edge definitely had some sand blasting notable.
 

PatrickW

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Aug 9, 2005
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Saw the preparations for this done once. The ashes were mixed with about 10 lbs of white flour to increase visibility.

The flour/ashes were put into a paper bag that was prepared by a guy who'd done it before. It was fairly elaborate, but the idea was that he'd toss the bag overboard and it would break open (I watched the preparations but kept a discrete distance and didn't ask any questions, given the solomn nature).

In flight, they disperesed the ashes with a Stearman. It was a "puff", but was very visible from the ground.

They did a nice job.

- Pat
 
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