Scale ME-262

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Urquiola

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I thought the Star of David was in the shape of a Pentagram. (?)
Pentagram, 'Pantacle' is the five-pointed star in US, China, Morocco and Cuba flags, Hexagram is a six pointed star, composed by two superposed triangles, although there are ways, same as for Pantacle, Pentalfa, estelado.jpgfor drawing it with a single trait. Blessings +
 

vhhjr

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The B-29 fuselage diameter is something like 9' 6" making a 1/4 scale version fuselage less than 24" in diameter. You're not gonna fit in it unless it is made out of scale.

Vince Homer
 

Aerowerx

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The B-29 fuselage diameter is something like 9' 6" making a 1/4 scale version fuselage less than 24" in diameter. You're not gonna fit in it unless it is made out of scale.

Vince Homer
Sorry. I was thinking B-36 and typed B-29.

The b36 had a fuselage diameter of over 11 feet, so 1/4th scale would be almost 3 feet diameter with a span of 57 feet.
 
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vhhjr

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I see some interesting structural issues with the long tube fuselage and the 57 ft wings. With only 33 inches to work with the pilot would be in a laydown seat. You might borrow the cockpit and wing designs from a high performance glider. You would have to use giant RC model engines as anything else would be too large for the nacelle space. If RC model jets were used (4 of them) the fuel burn would be considerable. Ten turning and burning would keep a single pilot rather busy and I see CG issues with a two pilot tandem arrangement.

Build it and fly it to Oshkosh and the "Dead" grass award and the October Sport Aviation magazine cover would be yours.

Vince Homer
 

vhhjr

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Fantastic project! The workmanship looks superb. I saw an original in a Swiss museum a few years ago and thought it would be a great homebuilt project. I built my P-39, ME-262 and B-25 mock-ups in wood and thought it to be a good medium for such projects for anyone with the proper skills. I look forward to watching your progress on this project. Do you have a projected first flight date?

The fuel burn will be high, but who cares. One doesn't build such replicas because of their fuel efficiency.

Vince Homer
 

Hexnut

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The N-20.2 Arbalète is definitely not a warbird. It was built as proof of concept for a projected fighter jet N-20 Aiguillon though.

And yes, fuel burn will be excessive, even with modern engines fitted. The aim is to reach one hour endurance by enlarging the fuel capacity.

There is no date set for the first flight as there are numerous obstacles to come over yet. Despite the fact that the aircraft was built and flown it needs some engineering. Costs for the engines will be another, besides certification to mention some.
 
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Riggerrob

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This isn't a warbird but on of my many favorites Payen Arbalète - Wikipedia
M. Payen's Arbalete is a graceful, civilian delta.

I disagree with your designation of the current Swiss homebuilt. The Swiss prototype was part of the development process for what would have become a Swiss military airplane (P202.2 Arbalete). Both the original glider and the modern plane - under construction - are sub-scale replicas of warbirds.
 

vhhjr

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To the average Joe onlooker it will be a warbird. What else could it be with its single seat, distinctive shape and zoomy performance?

Vince Homer
 

Hexnut

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If the N-20.2 is to be categorised as warbird or not will remain a personal opinion.

It was never intended to carry any weapons or systems of that kind and never did. It was not intended to produce the aircraft in numbers nor to see it in any active front role.
On the other hand it was developped through military funds serving as scaled down (60%) proof of concept for the projected N-20 fighter jet.

Which puts it somewhere in between. Nonetheless a fascinating aircraft for its time and today.

Details of the program can be found here: history
 

vhhjr

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Point taken on computational accuracy. At 28.5" diameter you're still not going to fit in it unless nearly prone. It starts to work around 40%. That's a big homebuilt!

Vince Homer
 

Aerowerx

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Point taken on computational accuracy. At 28.5" diameter you're still not going to fit in it unless nearly prone. It starts to work around 40%. That's a big homebuilt!

Vince Homer
If you read the entire sequence of posts, you will see that I was thinking B36 but typed B29. A 1/4 scale B36 would have about 3 feet in diameter. Quite feasible and would make a neat project.

Say 8 VW and 4 jet beetle engines?
 

vhhjr

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A 1/2 scale b-29! That would surely get the dead grass award at Oshkosh. Interesting that it would be similar in size to the Bally 1/3 B17. About the same wing span s a Cessna 206. Is it a single place or more?

Vince Homer
 

vhhjr

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Wait!!! It's 1/2 scale not 1/4. It's huge, About 70 ft. wingspan. Quite a project for a one man operation. I need to fact check more thoroughly before hitting "send."

Vince Homer
 

rv6ejguy

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Not 1/4 scale. Yes, it's huge. Not sure how many seats it will have.

I dropped the guy an email yesterday to see how it's progressed in the last year since he sent photos.
 
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