Russian UFO (not)

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Martin W

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May 14, 2021
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209
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This is simply a helium filled balloon shaped like a saucer.

With thrusters.

Balloons are proven technology but they are HUGE - HUGE - HUGE

The concept is the equivalent of using the Goodyear Blimp to deliver beer and pizza to a remote village,

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rotax618

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Martin, did you watch the Youtube video, I didn’t see any helium balloon. The video shows the test flying of three curcular winged craft which were aerial towed.
 

Martin W

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Messages
209
Martin, did you watch the Youtube video, I didn’t see any helium balloon. The video shows the test flying of three curcular winged craft which were aerial towed.
Yes ......... I watched it and enjoyed it , thanks.

My comment was about the Russian UFO in the first post.

And I come by my opinions legitimately .... every few years somebody new comes along with a cargo lifting balloon to solve transportation problems .... but they always leave out all the reasons it will not work and is not practical.

Mostly they want funding .... usually from governments .

If the idea was good in the first place they could raise their own funds .... put the machine to work ... and become billionaires by selling them around the world

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Aesquire

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Rochester, NY, USA
The painting showing the Saucer delivering containers is bogus as to SCALE. The containers should look like Legos lowered from a cargo van in proportion. Physics is a cruel mistress.

The idea of a horribly unstable saucer being immune to being yawed when the winds shift is interesting. Seems logical. That same symmetry means any yaw control is by active means, the multiple ducted fans on the perimeter. ( no vertical fins visible )

It might be a good solution to the real problem of spindle shaped airships with tail fins being rotated by the winds. Once you have that ground connection, of a line to the ground, forces act through that pivot point where it connects to your airship. ( presumably a roller arrangement like used in 4x4 bumper winches. )

Since I've never operated a cargo lowering airship, I don't know how big a problem that is. I'm aware of it from balloons, kites, and ground for glider ops. ( which I have done ) It's a CRITICAL issue in ground winch & vehicle tow launching. Mostly in exactly how you pull the glider and how that affects pitch, roll, & yaw.

Helicopter pilots who do lift ops can contribute better here.

My other impression is from knowing that an asymmetric wing shape generates a pitching moment. The reason the sky isn't populated with flying saucer shapes, built by humans, is despite the obvious cube-square law advantages of cargo capacity, when you move through the air, an asymmetric saucer, "wants" to flip end over end. A symmetrical saucer doesn't generate lift, unless you are at an angle of attack.... Which then wants to tumble.

A saucer, properly a convex lens, shape, is pitch & roll unstable. Even spinning on the yaw axis, as a discus or Frisbee does, only delays the tumble.

That may be overcome by Active power control from those nifty ducted fans on pivots around the saucer, but a failure of the computer stability system is a total failure to stay airborne, as in a F-16. ( which earned the nickname Lawn Dart when wire insulation failures crippled the fly by wire systems on some early planes. )

As to utility and economics.

If you have roads or rails to your destination, trucks & trains are far more economical. High value cargo and passengers can make sense & money by air. You'll notice there are Ships clustered at the edges of our continent waiting to unload, not Airbuses circling crowded airports full of... Exercise bikes, say. The "logistics problem" involved in this example don't apply to this discussion. I refer you to trucker forums ;)

But where there's no navigable waters, roads, or rails, then there's a good argument for Air transport. If high value cargo and passengers. Value is a variable. Diesel is VERY high value on the South Pole base. Jet-A may temporarily of high enough value to fly in for a military or resource exploration group.

Normally, it's people, medicine, important equipment etc. That you want to move by air.

When there's no navigable waters, roads, rails, or Airfields? Then helicopters have to compete with airships.

Usually to build an airfield for cargo planes.
(To deliver the road building equipment.? ;) )

Airships haven't had a good record for commercial use since the 1930s. Pity. They're cool.
 

sanman

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Feb 24, 2021
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246
Reminds me of the Aeroscraft- which uses a distinct technology that makes it like a flying submarine:

 
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