ROTAX 277 on a Mini-Max 1030

Discussion in 'The light stuff area' started by logansperber, Jul 21, 2015.

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  1. Jul 21, 2015 #1

    logansperber

    logansperber

    logansperber

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    I recently bought a Mini-Max and it comes with a ROTAX 277, 2 stroke engine, and this is my first kit plane. Is there certain things I should look out for while building it? I have done a lot of research but I just want to get answers from experienced pilots. Some simple questions I have is; what type of fabric and glue is used to cover the Mini-Max? Also, any suggestions on non-expensive digital instuments? Whats the fuel to oil ratio on a Rotax 277? Just basic questions. I have flown planes before but never built one so it would be very helpful to know the basics of building; such as materials, steps, suggestions, etc. Anything that is helpful will be looked into. Thanks!

    logansperber :)
     
  2. Jul 21, 2015 #2

    Dana

    Dana

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    Rotax engines all use 50:1 mix ratio. The glue should be specified in the kit instructions, but most likely either T-88 or West System epoxy. Covering is up to you; Poly-Fiber (Stits) is probably the most popular, but many people have used generic fabric and latex paint; Stewart System, Ceconite, and Oratex are other options.

    Google "East Tennessee Lonesome Buzzards", which is an online forum devoted to the Minimax series.

    Dana
     
  3. Jul 21, 2015 #3

    N8053H

    N8053H

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    I believe on something using a single cylinder engine, the fabric will not be regular fabric. But will be a fabric that weighs less then regular fabric. They have a name for this fabric, I just can not remember what its called.

    There are others here on this forum who know more about this then me. Maybe one will chime in on this and correct me if I am wrong.

    Tony Sweet
     
  4. Jul 22, 2015 #4

    logansperber

    logansperber

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    Ultralight Questions?

    I recently purchased an Mini-Max 1030 ultralight kit. I do not have much experience with ultralights and have done much research but I would like my questions answered by experienced pilots. I will list my questions below. It would be very helpful if you guys can answer as much as possible.

    Questions:
    1.) Do I need logs? If not, would it be helpful if I went to sell the ultralight?
    2.) Do I need a proffesional to do annuals for me to examine the ultralight to make sure it is airworth? Do I even need to do annuals?
    3.) What type of paint is used to cover the fabric with?
    4.) It has a Rotax 277 engine, two stroke, single cylinder. Any thing I should repair on it every once in a while?
    5.) What type of prop should I use?
    6.) Is there any websites that have basic parts for sale such as instruments, props, etc.?

    Thank You!
    logansperber
     
  5. Jul 22, 2015 #5

    Dana

    Dana

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    Logan, I merged your two threads on the same subject and put them in the "light stuff" area. To answer your questions:

    1. There is no legal requirement for logs. Keeping logs is a good idea anyway, not only if you want to sell it but to keep track of work you've done.
    2. Again, there is no legal requirement for any kind of inspections, annual or otherwise. But again it's a really good idea to give the plane a thorough inspection once a year. Whether you feel comfortable doing this yourself or you'd rather have professional assistance depends on your own abilities. Many A&P mechanics, however, are not familiar with ultralight construction and methods.

    Note the above two points apply to legal Part 103 ultralights only.

    3. If you're using a fabric "system" like Poly-Fiber, Ceconite, Stewart, etc., the paints are part of the system. Or as I said above, many people use generic polyester fabric with ordinary latex paint. Google is your friend here.
    4. See your other thread in the 2-stroke area.
    5. Probably a wood prop, exactly what you need depends on the engine/plane combination. The prop maker should be able to give you recommendations.
    6. For everything but props, Aircraft Spruce & Specialty. For props, google "ultralight propellers". Tennessee Propeller, Culver, Performance Propeller, GSC, Powerfin, there are many out there.

    Dana
     
  6. Jul 28, 2015 #6

    jedi

    jedi

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    I will highly recommend Orotex although I have not used it. Looks great, easy to work with and a superior product. A little more expensive but worth it.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2015 #7

    jedi

    jedi

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    Keep receipts and a build log so that you or a future owner can go EAB with N number if so desired at some later date.
     
  8. Jul 28, 2015 #8

    Turd Ferguson

    Turd Ferguson

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    When fabric covering became engineered, the weight and weave of cloth used was dictated by the aircraft's speed. There was also slow aircraft, lightweight cloth options. For a long time it was simply referred to as "glider cloth"

    Ray Stits made the best lightweight cloth ever, HS90X. That was some good stuff but for some reason it was discontinued when Polyfiber took over.

    I have never seen a mini-max with other than conventional covering methods, i.e., fabric glued to the structure, shrunk and covered with a finish coating.
     

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