RIP (TV's) Pappy Boyington

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by cluttonfred, Feb 10, 2020.

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  1. Feb 10, 2020 #1

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Actor Robert Conrad, who played USMC Maj Greg "Pappy" Boyington on "Baa Baa Black Sheep" and Jim West on "The Wild Wild West," passed away today.

    pappy.jpg west.jpg
     
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  2. Feb 10, 2020 #2

    MadRocketScientist

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    I remember watching reruns of the black sheep squadron on TV as a child and enjoying it immensely!
     
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  3. Feb 10, 2020 #3

    Staggermania

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    Ive got the series on dvd! It was only 2 seasons, but I loved watching the show growing up. The mechanic, Mickilin, was quite a character!
     
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  4. Feb 10, 2020 #4

    BJC

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    When my wife met the real Pappy, she was surprised at his small stature and his face, which seemed to validate all the fights that he had been in. A WW II ace, he was in the AVG, and was awarded the Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross and other lesser awards. A genuine rugged American individual and hero.


    BJC
     
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  5. Feb 10, 2020 #5

    cluttonfred

    cluttonfred

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    Reruns? I watched them when they came out when I was about ten years old. ;-)

     
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  6. Feb 10, 2020 #6

    Marc W

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    Youngsters!
     
  7. Feb 10, 2020 #7

    TFF

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    When I was small, about 3-5, I somehow watched the Mod Squad, the Monkees, Star Trek, and the Wild Wild West when they aired at night. I was the perfect age for the first run of syndication of classic TV in that 7-12 age when they ran these shows after school. Jim West was always cool.

    Baa Baa Black Sheep was made for me. WW2 airplane fan, mostly building plastic models of them every weekend. Corsair fan. One of my great uncles was the flight surgeon for VMF 214. He and the real Pappy were about the same age so they hung out together. My uncle also had the scrapbook archive of the unit, until reunions stripped a good bit of the pictures. He still had a bunch. So when the TV show hit, it was the best thing on. I still grumble that my cousin got the autograph Photo from Pappy. I use to have two Monogram Corsairs in formation that were hung on a coat hangar instead of the usual string. They were chasing a Zero.

    Robert Conrad was always in shows I wanted to watch and he made them great. Not a fan of his character, but I loved his car in Palm Springs Weekend. The hard top version was my first car. Still have it.
     
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  8. Feb 10, 2020 #8

    TFF

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    In one of his battery commercials, he taxied up in a biplane. Anyone remember what it was? I want to say a Smith Mini, but that is stretching the memory.
     
  9. Feb 10, 2020 #9

    Pops

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    Yep, looked like he took a few punches for sure. Can't tell a book from its cover. Toughness guy I know weighs 126 lbs. Got his weight up to 130 and got in the Marines. Knew a person in basic with him, said he taught the instructor in hand to hand that he didn't know much. So he spent his military career as a Basic Training instructor .
     
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  10. Feb 10, 2020 #10

    Pops

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    Our socks are older than some of these people. I had 3 kids in high school in 1976 when the "Black Sheep" was on TV. :)
     
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  11. Feb 10, 2020 #11

    tspear

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    I loved Baa Baa Black Sheep. (reruns)

    Tim
     
  12. Feb 10, 2020 #12

    Victor Bravo

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    Reruns as a child... ten years old... I got sectional charts older than you ! Heck I was already a teenager whan that show came out!

    The aerial shots were done at a place called Indian Dunes airstrip, and it was just a mile or so from the Six Flags Magic Mountain amusement park northwest of Los Angeles. The strip is now gone, one building is still there used as a farm shed. As a student pilot the instructors used to do the "surprise engine out" over that strip. They'd have the student look down at the roller coasters at Magic Mountain, and while we were looking out the left side they'd reach down and shut the fuel off. Then the instructor would say "OK, let's fly toward Santa Paula and we'll practice some..." and the poor little 150 would get quiet. You'd look around and see where you were going to land, and hopefully you would see something that looked like an airstrip and set up for it. On a half mile final the instructor would turn the fuel back on and you'd get the engine back. But if not, you had a safe place to land the 150. Indian Dunes was that airstrip for me.
     
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  13. Feb 10, 2020 #13

    jedi

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    Back in the days when CFIs were able to do those sorts of things.

    I lost my last job because the student actually did the shutdown check list for the examiner on the "simulated failed" engine. She (the student) was a very capable air force something considering going to to AF Pilot Training. She was a good stick and believed in being prepared and doing the right thing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
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  14. Feb 10, 2020 #14

    Vigilant1

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    Sorry for that, it doesn't seem right to ding you for that.
    Or, even to ding the student (too much). Sure, poor judgement in not specifically saying to the check pilot something like "I would not shut this engine down on my own. I'm confirming that you want me to actually shut it down. There is no checklist for simulated engine shutdown."
     
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  15. Feb 10, 2020 #15

    cluttonfred

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    jedi, could you explain that last bit? You got fired because as student actually performed the shutdown check list?!?
     
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  16. Feb 10, 2020 #16

    Pops

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    My instructor would time the engine start up just before the flare.
    One time doing a bi-annual I had one of those instructors that just ask you where you would land IF the engine would fail. You picked a field out and told him and that was the end of your engine out. When we were over some wooden hills in eastern Ohio, he ask me where would I land if the engine quit. I told him we just passed a good field on my left side down in a hollow, and I shut the engine down. He grabbed the hand strap on the door frame of the C-172 and kept saying "Thats OK, Thats OK. Told him we haven't made the field yet and flew down a high ridge and made a slipping 150 deg, left turn with full flaps down the side of the hill and over the trees as I fired the engine back up I said "We made it". He was holding on to the strap with both hands and was white.
    Yes , I know the book says to not slip with the full 40 degs of flaps, but I know what happens and can raise and lower the nose with the rudder in a full flap slip.
     
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  17. Feb 10, 2020 #17

    Pops

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    One time I got fired 3 times in one day. You really have to try to better than.
     
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  18. Feb 10, 2020 #18

    jedi

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    Typical pilot mill with the favorite examiner on staff.

    I expect the examiner thought he had the typical student and did not catch that the engine was really shut down till a little later. He came back really upset and insisted he would never fly with one of my students again. The school realized it was him or me (as the examiner insisted) and I was happy to go. When I fly with a student part of the preflight discussion is "If anything happens treat it as real and do what is necessary." "You continue to fly the aircraft...." etc.

    History: Cessna 172. I see too many students that are trained to say what they will do but do not actually develop the muscle memory to actually do it. They point to or perhaps touch the mags, mixture, and fuel while reciting the rote memorized items. With a good student I might at 5,000 feet over a mile of runway have them actually perform the actions after explaining "you do and I will undo" as needed.

    Same with emergency transmissions. They say "I would" bla, bla, bla. I do not settle for that. They are instructed to actually say the words, just do not push the transmit button. It is frequently amazing how that changes the thought that goes into the exercise. It is non standard communication and demonstrates if the student can actually fly and talk at the same time.

    Put the communications together with really doing the check list and interesting things can happen.

    Another well known and respected flight school doing the same thing at lower altitude with no airport in gliding range and a very worn ignition switch had the student shut the Cessna mags off then the key fell to the floor before the CFI could get to the switches. They did recover the key and recover the engine but had an interesting story. Examples like that are why the pilot mills do the short cuts.

    In my pilot training I was told that when the engine quits the prop will keep windmilling and you will not know until you push the throttle forward. That is true in many cases but not always. My first engine failure was a wood prop J-3 that I closed the throttle at top of descent in the traffic pattern and the prop stopped straight up and down.

    I have had other students that complete the engine failure checklist and fix the problem but never push the throttle forward and because of prior training never discover that the engine is running. At 500 feet I push the throttle up and explain that you fixed the problem a long time ago, do you want to continue to an unnecessary landing.

    Then there is the Piper Apache multi engine engine student that lost the engine on descent and it took more than two thousand feet for me to convinced him that he had unintentionally (due to a sly CFI) shut down one of his engines and only had one engine running. He did not believe me until I pushed up two throttles and only one engine responded.

    How many multi engine training programs include an engine failure on descent as a part of the training program?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2020
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  19. Feb 10, 2020 #19

    Victor Bravo

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    Sorry for the off-topic, but...

    If and when I ever become a Sport Pilot CFI sometime in the near future, I plan on finding a good safe road or something landable, and arranging for the student to have their engine failure nearby, and go all the way to a power-off landing. More than once. I'm fully aware that no modern flight scool will let me do that with their airplane, and I don't care. It will be my airplane, or the student's airplane.

    Landing the airplane on a road or a flat field is a life-saving skill for more than one type of emergency, and I am thankful every day of my life that I learned it. Old and un-improved basic skills are just as important as new electronic gadget skills. I'll be damned if I'm going to let any student out into the world on my watch without this and several other skills that are not commonly taught today.

    Anyway, back to the topic of the thread... I'm sure Pappy Boyington had decent training in engine out landings :)
     
  20. Feb 10, 2020 #20

    TarDevil

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    My chief instructor did dead stick landings routinely with students. I waited til everyone went home to do them myself.
     
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