RiggerRob, this ones for you.

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Riggerrob

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yes,
A few years back I was asked to consult on a project that included jumping without a parachute, then catching a 'chute in freefall. A quick internet search revealed that a couple of dozen skydivers had done it successfully dating back to the 1960s. One Frenchman even did dozens of chute-less jumps where he hooked onto a fellow jumper - wearing a tandem rig - in freefall.
With modern tandem equipment and wind tunnels, it is comparatively safe to develop a practical system.
 

Riggerrob

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That begs a bigger question: Why the flippin' H**L would you want to do that? :oops:
Chute-less jumps are a way to display their skill at catching other jumpers in freefall. They were a big deal when Bill Cole did the first chute-less jump back in the 1960s, but not so difficult today.
 

Topaz

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Chute-less jumps are a way to display their skill at catching other jumpers in freefall. They were a big deal when Bill Cole did the first chute-less jump back in the 1960s, but not so difficult today.
Chain of begged questions now: Couldn't you also display your skill at catching other jumpers in freefall... while wearing a flipping parachute??? o_O

You know, so that you don't die when your ego proves bigger than your skillset. I've got a jump-zone at the gliderport. Last time someone managed to descend all the way down without getting their parachute open, witnesses said he bounced about five feet back into the air before coming to rest.
 

robertl

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That begs a bigger question: Why the flippin' H**L would you want to do that? :oops:
I'm with you Topaz, I made a few jumps back in the 70's but why in the HE doubble hocky sticks would you even want to do that unless you just want to say you had done it. I worked with a guy that ate a $100.00 bill at a bar one time just to prove that he would and I'm like, you can eat your whole wallet for all I care, I'm not impressed.
Bob
 

Dominic Eller

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Some folks do these kind of high risk tasks for recognition and impressing people.
However there is another category who undertake zero error tolerance tasks with dire consequences as a training and validation for the ability to control you brain to stay on task in what can be a high stress situation.
Some would argue there is no point in taking the extra risk as often the same or similar task can be performed with an “out” available, this however misses the point that it’s a metal exercise that is pursued only after the prerequisite motor skills have been acquired.
Only after having intentionally put yourself through this kind of task can you really see the mental benefits that can be gained going forward in all activities undertaken that induce stress and require performing well.
It’s for sure not everyone’s cup of tea and those who feel it necessary had best put the required work in before hand!
It also doesn’t always have to carry fatal consequences to be effective just degrees of risk.
Sorry didn’t mean to write so much but it all just fell out of my brain…

A9ABCF24-6DC5-434E-9382-45E83D20CC64.jpeg
 

Richard MacCrone

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could you imagine what that would be like ?
Some years ago a cameraman got into the habit of putting on his rig on the climb to exit altitude. On his last jump he forgot and filmed all the way to the ground. Massive failures here in the jumper's attitude and the failure of even basic safety precautions. On most Dropzones jumpers "pin-check" each other to prevent potential problems. Had it been done here it would have most certainly prevented a needless fatality.
 

Dominic Eller

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At the funeral:

"I'm gonna miss him."

"Yeah. But on the plus side, his mental acuity is fantastic!"
The point being, there should not be a funeral or even a cock up because all the prerequisite hard work has been done.
Those who do things to just impress others may find the external motivation can induce performing things before they are ready.
I think free climbers like Alex Honnold exemplify the best qualities in pursuit of metal control in high risk scenarios.
 

Rhino

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The point being, there should not be a funeral or even a cock up because all the prerequisite hard work has been done.
The point being, that "should" is the operative word in that sentence. It's a pointless risk of human life. It wouldn't be that big of a deal if that person was the only one affected, but it never works that way. But on the bright side, he could win a Darwin Award.
 

C Michael Hoover

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Back in the early '70s (an earlier incarnation), I was racing motorcycles (flat-track) when a hanger-on convinced me to try jumping. We trained most of the day with an ex=Army instructor and jumped off a platform into a sand pit till sore, but able to do the hit and roll. Fitted with WW II parachutes (really!) 6 jumpers and a jumpmaster loaded up into a 182. Struggled up to 3000'AGL and I was placed onto the step with my fingers denting the strut. Problem is that I am 6'6" and don't fit under the strut of a 182. When the jumpmaster slapped my leg, I went back and promptly went through risers. (This was static line back then.) After I straightened my helmet and glasses I saw that I had a Mae West and started to drop the main chute when I thought that I could clear the lines. I did but had reversed control. I pulled on one riser as hard as I could to land at the edge of the tree line with the chute in the trees.
Went back the next day, the jumpmaster saw that my height was the problem , told me how to overcome that, (release the legs first then the hands) jumped three more times, got my log book signed excellent and never went back. And won't.
 

Daleandee

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A number of years ago I had a conversation with two very young folks (one male and his girlfriend) that said they were skydive instructors. They had invited me to go with them for a jump but I politely declined. She asked me if I was "scared" to skydive to which I said, "absolutely."

She said she didn't understand my answer as she had watched me fly my ultralight all over the place all the time. She then asked, "isn't that dangerous?"

My answer was that when I went out to the runway and rolled the power on I would generally know within a few seconds if all of my stuff was working correctly or not. With a chute I'd have to go with them to 12.5K, jump from a perfectly good airplane, pull a rope and see if my stuff was working correctly.

She then told me that they always carry a back up (reserve chute). I smiled at her as I said, "and you should!"
 

Pops

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Back in the early '70s (an earlier incarnation), I was racing motorcycles (flat-track) when a hanger-on convinced me to try jumping. We trained most of the day with an ex=Army instructor and jumped off a platform into a sand pit till sore, but able to do the hit and roll. Fitted with WW II parachutes (really!) 6 jumpers and a jumpmaster loaded up into a 182. Struggled up to 3000'AGL and I was placed onto the step with my fingers denting the strut. Problem is that I am 6'6" and don't fit under the strut of a 182. When the jumpmaster slapped my leg, I went back and promptly went through risers. (This was static line back then.) After I straightened my helmet and glasses I saw that I had a Mae West and started to drop the main chute when I thought that I could clear the lines. I did but had reversed control. I pulled on one riser as hard as I could to land at the edge of the tree line with the chute in the trees.
Went back the next day, the jumpmaster saw that my height was the problem , told me how to overcome that, (release the legs first then the hands) jumped three more times, got my log book signed excellent and never went back. And won't.
Back in the 1960's had a friend that was skydiving. Thought that I would make the first jump to see if I liked it. I had just got married and my wife was also friends of my friends wife. She was told, and hit the ceiling. SO, I never did make that first jump. Then my hanger neighbor of 20+ years had a skydiving club. So I just naturally fit in. I helped out as much as possible and have lots, lots of time in the right seat hauling skydivers. Was even a back up pilot in the backup C-182, but was always to busy :) and could make it. Many times, told the 10 or 12 in the B-18 that there wasn't enough of them to get me out of that door. Found out that my wife was smarter than I was.
Only person crazier than a skydiver is a flat track motorcycle racer :)
 

Topaz

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The point being, that "should" is the operative word in that sentence. It's a pointless risk of human life. It wouldn't be that big of a deal if that person was the only one affected, but it never works that way. But on the bright side, he could win a Darwin Award.
This. I'm sorry, but needlessly risking your life to show off to others is bad enough. Needlessly risking your life to prove to yourself that you've mastered all the steps is just insane. You either know you have mastered them or you do not. If you do not, you shouldn't be risking your life to prove you have. If you know you've mastered all the steps, you don't need to risk your life to prove it, and there's nothing that is proved by jumping without a parachute that cannot be equally proved by jumping with one. In the end, needlessly risking your life simply to prove your skills is no more nor less than showing off - either you're showing off to others or you're showing off to yourself. Either way, you're being a fool.

And yes, every time someone stops their fall by lithobraking instead of parachute, it hits the news and all of the aviation world suffers.
 
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