Reynolds 953 Stainless Steel Tubing???

Discussion in 'General Experimental Aviation Questions' started by Southron, Jun 4, 2012.

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  1. Jun 4, 2012 #1

    Southron

    Southron

    Southron

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    The people over at the bicycle building websites are extolling the virtues of the Reynolds 953 Stainless Steel tubing. Seems that Reynolds 953 SS tubing is so strong, the tubes walls can be drawn so thin that bikes that are built out of 953 SS tubing are STRONGER than aluminum but as LIGHT (OR LIGHTER) then bikes built using of aluminum tubes.

    Are any aircraft home builders using Reynolds 953 SS tubing in their project rather than 4130 Normalized?

    Of course, the connection between the bicycle business and aviation is that builders of both airplanes and aircraft are interested in "strong but light" construction metals and materials. Just ask the Wright Brothers!

    All of your comments and insights would be most Welcome!!

    THANKS!
     
  2. Jun 4, 2012 #2

    Dana

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    Sounds like strong stuff but at that hardness level I would be concerned about brittleness. Welding stainless is trickier than 4130, too.

    -Dana

    1. Misogynist.........Women are no good
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    3. Environmentalist...People are no good
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  3. Jun 4, 2012 #3

    Hot Wings

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    Nice stuff for a bike frame.

    http://www.strongframes.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/953-FAQs.pdf

    But even in the bike world there is a bit of controversy about how to weld it. Other down sides for aircraft use are limited sizes available and it's a ***** to work with compared to 4130 unless you get it un-aged. I can't verify the last because at around $100 per foot I can't justify the cost to build a frame with it.

    If you were building an HPA where every gram matters and had a good sponsor then maybe it would have a use in aviation.

    Edit: Just found out there is a built in censor on HBA.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  4. Jun 4, 2012 #4

    BBerson

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    How is it lighter than aluminum?
    Must be thinner, but I did not see any thickness spec.


    What I need is .016" wall x 1/2" 4130 tube.

    As for welding stainless, I use mild steel rod. It welds easily with mild steel. (but yes the weld area can rust slightly)
     
  5. Jun 4, 2012 #5

    Hot Wings

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    How is it lighter than aluminum?
    Must be thinner, but I did not see any thickness spec.


    It's density is greater than aluminum. It's strength to weigh ratio is much superior.

    Bicycle tubing is double butted. The outside diameter is constant (28.6 to 34.9mm) but the thickness varies from 0.5mm wall on the ends to 0.3mm in the center for the smaller diameter main tubes. 0.3mm = 0.0118 inches or less than half .028" 4130. That is how they make bike frames light.
     
  6. Jun 4, 2012 #6

    bmcj

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    There is?
     
  7. Jun 4, 2012 #7

    BBerson

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    The .018" tube thickness is ideal for an ultralight. But this Reynolds tube it not available any smaller than 1".

    I have welded tubes as thin as .014" (the green bush stakes sold at the lawn and garden stores have a cheap .014" steel tube core inside the green plastic).

    I also tried sanding some 1/2"x .035" 4130 to make it thinner. Takes about 5 minutes per foot. The ends can be left thicker for welding similar to the bicycle.
    BB
     
  8. Jun 4, 2012 #8

    Dana

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    3x denser than aluminum, tensile strength approx 3x too, but higher elastic modulus means more resistance to buckling, which is often the limiting factor, so presumably it can be made smaller.

    -Dana

    Some people should thank their lucky stars that everything I wish for doesn't come true.
     
  9. Jun 5, 2012 #9

    Hot Wings

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    [​IMG] Originally Posted by Hot Wings [​IMG]

    Edit: Just found out there is a built in censor on HBA.



    There is?

    Yes, and it would have to modified if this were a site devoted to dog breeding :emb:

    It automatically deleted my adjective and replaced it with the *****
     
  10. Mar 23, 2014 #10

    BBerson

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    This Reynolds 953 is interesting. Take a look at the comparison chart below (953 is strongest red line, click chart to read)
    Any idea about the cost per foot?
     

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