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Reviving a hangar queen?

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Pilot-34

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I suspect there are a few in this forum that have ignored the conventional advice and purchased hanger queen to rejuvenate.
For those of you that have what have you found that were either major stumbling blocks or completely brought you to a stop?

I have come across aircraft that have spent as much is 20 years in a heated hanger without being flown.
Course there’s always the derelict at the end of the runway that has sat there sinking into the soil or even the asphalt for the last 20 years.
For those that have done it are there things that are a major positive?
 

Twodeaddogs

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spar corrosion, engine corroded beyond economic repair, steel tube corrosion in a Piper Cub, ruined fabric,resident insects, mould. Corrosion, fuel leaks, oil leaks,hydraulic leaks......like falling in love with a rusty car at the back of the lot. remember the old adage about the cost of owning a boat? You might as well stand under the shower while tearing up50 dollar bills.
 

Pilot-34

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Lol Yeah I’m probably that guy I mean I got the first auto I ever owned of my own by digging it up out of the yard.
I was sent to dig up a garden and I found a truck!
And yes JC Whitney and I got to be really good friends
 

Turd Ferguson

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I suspect there are a few in this forum that have ignored the conventional advice and purchased hanger queen to rejuvenate.
For those of you that have what have you found that were either major stumbling blocks or completely brought you to a stop?
For those that have done it are there things that are a major positive?
Yeah, you do it because you can. Nothing that can't be restored or repaired - do it because you can, not to make a quick buck.
 

proppastie

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you will need to find a mechanic that will work with you to sign off your work....you can save a buck and learn lots and when you are done you will know that airplane inside and out. In the end you may qualify for the A&P exam if the mechanic will write a letter and attest to your hours. I have a friend that buys aircraft for the core price of the engine. so that is the price range you should be looking at.
 

Pilot-34

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I’ve often thought that would be an excellent way to work on your A&P
 

Dan Thomas

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Rebuilding one airplane is a really poor way to get an A&P. The experience is so narrow. Shops want broader experience; they can't afford to train you in the stuff you should know already.

You could find one in a hangar. Buy it for cheap, like $8k. Spend $40k on it and end up with an airplane worth $15k. Old airplanes are only really valuable if they're pristine. No corrosion anywhere. Engine top condition. Sadly, airplanes rot whther they're flown or not. Sometimes not flying is worse; the mice take over, sometimes birds too and they do terrific damage. Or the owner pulls it out once in a while and starts it up and runs it for a few minutes. That fills the crankcase with water and other corrosive combustion byproducts that mix with the oil and form acids that quietly eat the engine from the inside out. Aircraft engines need to fly for an hour or more to drive that stuff out. Ground-running won't do it. Makes it much worse.
 

Pops

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A friend and I wanted to buy a 1956 C-172 in about 1965. We just couldn't afford it. In 1992 I bought a 1956 C-172 with the bare fuselage in an old chicken house and the engine and wings in a wood work shop and everything else in an attic. Truck it several states home and after going over the logs better it was the same airplane that we wanted to buy in 1965. Rebuilt it like new in every way. New everything . New skins on the stab and a lot of work on the wings, overhauled the engine, new paint, interior, all hardware, cables, every bolt, etc. Flew it for many years. I still have pictures of it from 1965. 226 one made in Nov, 1955, Some rebuilding is a labor of love.
 

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Little Scrapper

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A friend and I wanted to buy a 1956 C-172 in about 1965. We just couldn't afford it. In 1992 I bought a 1956 C-172 with the bare fuselage in an old chicken house and the engine and wings in a wood work shop and everything else in an attic. Truck it several states home and after going over the logs better it was the same airplane that we wanted to buy in 1965. Rebuilt it like new in every way. New everything . New skins on the stab and a lot of work on the wings, overhauled the engine, new paint, interior, all hardware, cables, every bolt, etc. Flew it for many years. I still have pictures of it from 1965. 226 one made in Nov, 1955, Some rebuilding is a labor of love.
Man, that’s awesome!!
 

Little Scrapper

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I say go for it. It may seem expensive but it’s still cheaper than boats and horses. Haha.

I did quite a lot of work on a 46 Taylorcraft. The A&P was cool about it, He saw my work and totally trusted it and me. It’s all about relationships.

Get something you can have fun on and start building those relationships. Sounds fun!

I’m still looking for a cheap DC3. Lol
 

akwrencher

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Lol, not much is more expensive than boats and horses. If you like restoring things, go for it. Few manage to come in under market value. It's a labor of love, understand that and proceed accordingly. Same thing goes for lots of other projects, most old cars, boats, etc. It's a hobby. Once in a blue moon you'll come across something truly worth some cash when done. Most of us aren't that lucky. Although, I did pick up a 66 mustang with a mostly done engine for $500 bucks. Now if I could just find time to work on it.....
 

Pilot-34

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Lol yes if life was about the money I’d look at pictures , buy fish in a can and steak in a box.....
 

Tom Emery

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I suspect there are a few in this forum that have ignored the conventional advice and purchased hanger queen to rejuvenate.
For those of you that have what have you found that were either major stumbling blocks or completely brought you to a stop?

I have come across aircraft that have spent as much is 20 years in a heated hanger without being flown.
Course there’s always the derelict at the end of the runway that has sat there sinking into the soil or even the asphalt for the last 20 years.
For those that have done it are there things that are a major positive?
Found a sailboat sitting in a field for 15 years. Rebuilt her. Sailed her. Lived on her. Sold her.
44' Kelly Peterson center cockpit cutter rig. Paid $7500.00. Invested 50,000. Sold her for 58.000. Broke even.
 

Derswede

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Local private strip is populated with hanger queens. Had an A&P friend walk the line with me one day, the only plane there out of 20 or so that he said looked decent was an Aeronca Chief. Spent the next few weeks trying to buy it, owner said (and we all have heard this!!), "no, don't want to sell it, will get it back flying one day!" Two years later, still there. Owner is on the north side of 75, has a nice disassembled 140 Cessna in his back yard building, wife says "No Hand-propping anymore!" and the son is an airline captain who lives in a condo in TX. Only way to get one of these birds will be at the estate sale.

At that strip: DH Chipmunk, 2 x Piper Comache, Bonanza, three 172's, the Chief, a J3 (only plane that ever flies from that strip), a Baby Ace, a 152, and a couple of other birds are at that field. The owner flys his J3 on occasion, and they may have a company bird in a hanger there, but I have never seen it out. The A&P said that the cost to get any of them flying would put his kid thru college! Several have not moved in 15-20 years.

Derswede
 

Little Scrapper

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There’s gonna be a lot of airplanes available over the next 10-15 years. Many will be in the scrap pile.

As Akwtencher says. Labor of love. Find something you really love and throw some money at it but enjoy the process because ultimately that’s the goal I suppose.
 

Tom Emery

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Local private strip is populated with hanger queens. Had an A&P friend walk the line with me one day, the only plane there out of 20 or so that he said looked decent was an Aeronca Chief. Spent the next few weeks trying to buy it, owner said (and we all have heard this!!), "no, don't want to sell it, will get it back flying one day!" Two years later, still there. Owner is on the north side of 75, has a nice disassembled 140 Cessna in his back yard building, wife says "No Hand-propping anymore!" and the son is an airline captain who lives in a condo in TX. Only way to get one of these birds will be at the estate sale.

At that strip: DH Chipmunk, 2 x Piper Comache, Bonanza, three 172's, the Chief, a J3 (only plane that ever flies from that strip), a Baby Ace, a 152, and a couple of other birds are at that field. The owner flys his J3 on occasion, and they may have a company bird in a hanger there, but I have never seen it out. The A&P said that the cost to get any of them flying would put his kid thru college! Several have not moved in 15-20 years.

Derswede
I found one of those hanger queens. A-10 Mitchell wing. Gentleman bought it, never flew it. Been sitting at least 10 years. It will be back in the air by the middle of the summer. I just have to get it down off this mountain....
 

proppastie

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Rebuilding one airplane is a really poor way to get an A&P. The experience is so narrow. Shops want broader experience;
To me having an A&P means I can work on my Mooney sign off everything except the annual and 337s, do conditions inspections on an experimental should I end up with one or help out a friend.
 
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