replica's other than p-51 p-40

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

ScaleBirdsScott

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
1,345
Location
Uncasville, CT
There's a really nice looking 80% Zero being put together in the Czech Republic. I'm quite impressed by the amount of metalshaping that has gone into it, plus just the sheer amount of design to make the structure so clean. Last I saw they had it up on gear, looking forward to seeing the wings and so-on.
 

Riggerrob

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 9, 2014
Messages
2,145
Location
Canada
Perhaps we need 4 master lists of replica airplanes: early birds and WW1 (pre 1919), inter-war 1919 to 1939) , WW2 (1939 t0n1945) and finally post 1945.

My list only includes replicas that have flown. Later, we will have to add how many flew, are plans still available, what scale, what engine, how many seats, etc. Sizes range between half scale and full scale. All the War Aircraft Replicas (WAR) were half scale and a tight fit on modern pilots, so most got 100 hp. engines.
We should also note which number of engines and type of engine(s) with an emphasis on cetrtified (Continental, Franklin, Lycoming, Menasco, Ranger, DH Cirrus, Revmaster (VW), Rotax, Walter, etc.)
Were plans offered? It also helps to know if kits were offered.
I am also trying to avoid anything beyond the skills of amateurs (e.g full-scale, almost production quality FW-190 and Messerschmitt 262 replicas built by professional sheet metal workers).
Stand-off scale might need a separate list.
Sorry, but it has been a few years since I played with Excel spread sheets.

Avia, one-off from the Czech Republic

Focke-Wulf 190, Jurca, WAR, etc.
Jukers Ju-87 Stuka, an American one-off plus Pete Bowers offered plans for a replica based upon his Namu two-seater
Messerschmitt 109, Jurca, WAR, etc.

Italian Macchi (?) one-off, by a Canadian, based upon Piel Emeraude wings

Mitsubishi Zero, WAR, etc.

Bell P-39 Airacobra and P-60 King Cobra
Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, one-off by Bally, 50 percent
Curtiss P-40 WAR, Jurca
Grumman Hellcat
Grumman Bearcat, a one-off built in Quebec and he might(?) have offered plans
Lockheed P-38 Lightning, at least 2 separate one-offs in the USA
NAA P-51 Mustang, Jurca, Falconair, Thunder, Titan, Loehle, WAR, etc.
Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, Jurca, WAR, etc.
Ryan trainers
Vought F4F Corsair, WAR and a few others

DH Tiger Moth
DH Mosquito, France, roughly half scale
Hawker Fury biplane, Issacs in Britain sold plans
Hawker Hurricane, Sindlinger plans and an Italian ultralight
Hawker Sea Fury, WAR
Supermarine Spitfire, Jurca, etc.
Westland Whirlwind, a one-off in New England during the 1970s or 1980s

Yak 1 and 9, a one-off in Canada plus 2 built in the Czech Republic

Please feel free to add to my list.
 

Marc W

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2017
Messages
756
Location
Colorado
There is a 75% P-40 on Barnstormers. Ranger engine. No indication of type of construction.
P-40 Warhawk
P-40 WARHAWK • $59,000 • FOR SALE • P-40 Warhawk. 3/4 scale museum quality replica. TTSN 26 hours. Ranger in-line engine 10 hours SMOH. 3-bladed prop, retractable landing gear. Always hangered. Contact Bob for further details. Calgary, Alberta. (403) 650-2122 • Contact Robert James , Friend of Owner - located Whitefish, MT United States • Telephone: 403-650-2122 • Posted August 15, 2021 • Show all Ads posted by this AdvertiserRecommend This Ad to a FriendEmail AdvertiserSave to WatchlistReport This AdView Larger Images
 

Saville

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
287
Location
Boston Ma
I doubt you'd get much grief flying a Japanese replica with Japanese markings. There are one or two Zero's flying around with WWII markings (e.g. the Planes of Fame Zero) as well as hordes of AT-6/Zeros and a few dive bombers. I've never read nor heard of any heartburn over the markings.
 

Dennis K

Member
Joined
May 23, 2014
Messages
23
Location
Portsmouth, NH USA
Perhaps we need 4 master lists of replica airplanes: early birds and WW1 (pre 1919), inter-war 1919 to 1939) , WW2 (1939 t0n1945) and finally post 1945.

My list only includes replicas that have flown. Later, we will have to add how many flew, are plans still available, what scale, what engine, how many seats, etc. Sizes range between half scale and full scale. All the War Aircraft Replicas (WAR) were half scale and a tight fit on modern pilots, so most got 100 hp. engines.
We should also note which number of engines and type of engine(s) with an emphasis on cetrtified (Continental, Franklin, Lycoming, Menasco, Ranger, DH Cirrus, Revmaster (VW), Rotax, Walter, etc.)
Were plans offered? It also helps to know if kits were offered.
I am also trying to avoid anything beyond the skills of amateurs (e.g full-scale, almost production quality FW-190 and Messerschmitt 262 replicas built by professional sheet metal workers).
Stand-off scale might need a separate list.
Sorry, but it has been a few years since I played with Excel spread sheets.

Avia, one-off from the Czech Republic

Focke-Wulf 190, Jurca, WAR, etc.
Jukers Ju-87 Stuka, an American one-off plus Pete Bowers offered plans for a replica based upon his Namu two-seater
Messerschmitt 109, Jurca, WAR, etc.

Italian Macchi (?) one-off, by a Canadian, based upon Piel Emeraude wings

Mitsubishi Zero, WAR, etc.

Bell P-39 Airacobra and P-60 King Cobra
Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, one-off by Bally, 50 percent
Curtiss P-40 WAR, Jurca
Grumman Hellcat
Grumman Bearcat, a one-off built in Quebec and he might(?) have offered plans
Lockheed P-38 Lightning, at least 2 separate one-offs in the USA
NAA P-51 Mustang, Jurca, Falconair, Thunder, Titan, Loehle, WAR, etc.
Republic P-47 Thunderbolt, Jurca, WAR, etc.
Ryan trainers
Vought F4F Corsair, WAR and a few others

DH Tiger Moth
DH Mosquito, France, roughly half scale
Hawker Fury biplane, Issacs in Britain sold plans
Hawker Hurricane, Sindlinger plans and an Italian ultralight
Hawker Sea Fury, WAR
Supermarine Spitfire, Jurca, etc.
Westland Whirlwind, a one-off in New England during the 1970s or 1980s

Yak 1 and 9, a one-off in Canada plus 2 built in the Czech Republic

Please feel free to add to my list.
I seem to remember there was a PZXL-P.11C with a Ford engine that showed up at Oshkosh some years ago.
 

Wanttaja

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
1,825
Location
Seattle, WA
I doubt you'd get much grief flying a Japanese replica with Japanese markings. There are one or two Zero's flying around with WWII markings (e.g. the Planes of Fame Zero) as well as hordes of AT-6/Zeros and a few dive bombers. I've never read nor heard of any heartburn over the markings.
If it were a full-scale replica, I have no trouble putting on swastikas, meatball, fasces, red star, or any other historically-accurate markings. I'm OK with the T-6/Zero BT-13/Val modifications, too, since these have similar appearance and size to the original. AND they were used that way in a movie.

I don't think I have an objection to the markings on sub-scale replicas specifically intended to reproduce historic aircraft.

However, I'm a bit more skittish about using the markings on a given plane with no more than a vague resemblance to a historic design...and a Fly Baby, even with wheel pants, would certainly qualify.

Funny coincidence, I took a BFR this week. The instructor's grandfather had been a POW in Japan during the war, captured at Bataan. I'd feel just a little embarrassed if he saw my Fly Baby with Japanese WWII markings.

Then there's this...
C140 German Swastika001.jpg
It's since been repainted.

Ron Wanttaja
 

Pops

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2013
Messages
9,731
Location
USA.
If it were a full-scale replica, I have no trouble putting on swastikas, meatball, fasces, red star, or any other historically-accurate markings. I'm OK with the T-6/Zero BT-13/Val modifications, too, since these have similar appearance and size to the original. AND they were used that way in a movie.

I don't think I have an objection to the markings on sub-scale replicas specifically intended to reproduce historic aircraft.

However, I'm a bit more skittish about using the markings on a given plane with no more than a vague resemblance to a historic design...and a Fly Baby, even with wheel pants, would certainly qualify.

Funny coincidence, I took a BFR this week. The instructor's grandfather had been a POW in Japan during the war, captured at Bataan. I'd feel just a little embarrassed if he saw my Fly Baby with Japanese WWII markings.

Then there's this...
View attachment 114511
It's since been repainted.

Ron Wanttaja
I used to work with a man that survived the Bataan death march. Also worked with Jews from the concentration camps, etc.
People today tend to think history started when they were born and all of WW-2 is ancient history, what little they know of it.
I remember it well. My brother-in-law was a U.S. Marine in the South Pacific and also my wife's older brother.
 
Last edited:

ScaleBirdsScott

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
1,345
Location
Uncasville, CT
I'll say that from my experience I've had a few Korean friends from college question my idea to potentially build a replica Zero (as an opponent to the P-36 or Hellcat) which would have the big Imperial meatball on the side.

For them the thought perks up as a little painful more than in other parts of the world. Then again, they did question my idea to build an aircraft in general, and particularly one that looks like a warplane, so there's probably some nuances of context that is not shared across the cultures and lifestyles. But I remember one saying "might not want to put the red circle on it."

Ultimately I respect their perspective but wouldn't follow the suggestion as I know the context of why I would be painting up a zero like that. But I do wonder about what are the motivations that someone would go through the work to build a replica Zero and paint it as that? I would have to assume either they are very much Japano-philes while also being of a personality to build and fly an aircraft, which must be a small group, or they are someone who just appreciates that specific aircraft for its legend and/or its attractive form, which is certainly going to be the marjoity. There may be some small number who, in some way, just like going against the grain to the extent they want an axis fighter replica to be the 'bad guy' at the fly-in. Perhaps the average Zero replica builder contains a little of all the above.

Clearly very few today from any walk of life would ever look at an aircraft that vaguely resembles something that the Japanese might have flown in WWII, with a matching paintscheme, and think it a celebration of Imperial Japanese empire and atrocity. Some might still be reminded of it, perhaps think of kamikaze attacks and Pearl Harbor and other applications of the aircraft which have a painful history, and they may not prefer it; but few I think would accuse the builder or pilot of being a Tojo sympathizer so-to-speak. However I'm sure there are some small number out there.

On the other hand, what might cause an individual to of all the possible replicas choose a German WWII aircraft and adorn it with livery complete with swastikas? It's maybe a slightly trickier context in the west. Maybe the pilot just really likes German aircraft and weapons from an engineering standpoint and wanted to add a FW to the collection, or maybe they really like the stories of a specific ace and it inspired their appreciation for a specific FW and specific paintscheme. Maybe they are a "Wehraboo" who thinks German armed forces were the best and the whole Nazi association was no big deal and everyone is blowing it out of proportion. Or maybe they're secretly a full-blown Nazi sympathizer and want to express their appreciation. It's contextually more sticky in the popular context. And so that's why I think we tend to see replicas censor the German markings in particular when they're roundels and the like even if it's clearly a replica that is primarly made for historical appreciation's sake. The meaning behind that appreciation is always going to be slightly suspect.

Because the Japanese 'meatball' really is just a red circle, it's hard to censor meaningfully. One could I suppose choose a different color, or break it up in some way, but it's a circle, hardly much one can do without just drawing a lot of attention to something clearly wrong. The swastika in paintschemes comes off far more pointed and 'sharp' and its complexity also makes it rather easy to obfuscate in ways that exclaim its defacement while adhering somewhat to the concept of representing the graphical and visual existence of a marking. There's also the less spicy Iron Cross which in another timeline likely would have adorned such aircraft anyway.
 

flitzerpilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2017
Messages
184
Location
Hirwaun, Aberdare, S.Wales, UK.
Yes, you could easily modify a Flitzer Z-1 to look Hungarian. However, that really belongs in the "inter-war" list of replicas.

True, but it's also true that many superannuated types, often biplanes, performed in second-line, combat trainer, night harassment or close-support roles in WW2, especially on the Russian Front, up to and including 1945. Typically these were Ar 66, Bu 131, Fiat CR.32 & 42, He 50, Go 145, Ro 41, Avia Ba 122 & B534, etc.

The choice to modify a Z-1R is based on the availability of a R2800 radial, numerous existing Flitzer parts and so forth, which, when combined, can better achieve the 'look' of such a generic type, rather than that of an earlier period, say of a WW1 fighter type in which it would be more difficult to install a fixed radial within a rather short chord rotary engine cowling.

One other type which appeals to me which could use Flitzer parts is the Swedish Jaktfalk fighter which also served with the Finnish Air Force, although as an advanced trainer in the Winter War. I have great admiration for the Finns for the valiant defence of their homeland, but although I like the pretty blue upright swastika, which was first used on a Finnish aeroplane Ca 1919, its later associations would doubtless result in criticism or damage at worst.

The lesser controversial 'Hungarian' cross on an obscure biplane is just a way of avoiding using a UK registration to create a 'sense of period' by using military markings on such a machine. The inner fighter pilot needs to be fed! :0)
 

ScaleBirdsScott

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 10, 2015
Messages
1,345
Location
Uncasville, CT
The Finnish blue swastika is a tricky one but certainly should be displayed when it makes sense to do so. Surprisingly their air force only very recently dropped the swastika in favor of a white and blue roundel which also looks quite good but would be needlessly anachronistic on any vintage-style aircraft carrying a Finnish style livery.

Personally if we're doing pre-to-early WWII biplanes my vote is definitely with the Swedish Jaktfalken, particularly the J 6B they featured in War Thunder, quite a good look to it.
 

flitzerpilot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 19, 2017
Messages
184
Location
Hirwaun, Aberdare, S.Wales, UK.
Hi Scott,

Agreed, the Jaktfalk is indeed one of my favourites, but would need to revert to four ailerons and requires an independent upper centre-section, which means I'd have to reject my existing 'A' frame cabane. I attach a preliminary view of a scaled J-6B showing the substitution of a Flitzer Meteor/Stormcock (F.5-iteration 9) fuselage with the cockpit moved 4" further aft than on the Z-21 (hence the parallel seat back members, the front one of which is redundant) and shows the R2800 radial. The design is not a true-scale Jaktfalk but is close enough I think. The standard Flitzer wheels are slightly oversize, but in stock. The wings are based on the 34" and 32" Z-21 rib chords, but the lower TE could be extended slightly to match them up, as on the actual Jaktfalk.


J6 Jaktfalk F.5 9.jpg
 

pylon500

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
403
Location
Taree Airport Australia
I have a partly-built Mitsubishi A6M hanging up in my shed.

My favorite historic aircraft as a kid, the Zero was so superior to Allied opponents of its time, it’s said that without it Japan would never have attacked Britain and the US.

Years ago I decided a 75% replica would be a viable personal aircraft. It was to have been powered by a Diesel engine, to give it the sort of massive range which made the original so lethal.

I spent years on it, helped by conservators from the Australian War Memorial, who shared plans and design details they used to restore the Zero hanging in their Canberra museum.
Also had mobs of help from several of this country’s best designers and engineers.

Too many projects and other interests, too little time…
Now it gathers dust in my shed.

View attachment 114472
Hey there OK, I know that feeling and pretty much in the same boat:confused:
I too had tired of all the Mustangs and Spitfires, and looking at the Rotec motors, started drawings for a 75% Harvard, which I toyed with being able to switch over to some 'Zero' bits, as was done in Tora Tora Tora.
I then decided that I liked the Zero aerodynamically, and would go closer scale, although often wondered what sort of reception I'd get around the place parking next to the Sullivan Spitfires in a Zero, in Australia (not that I really cared), but like you things just seem to keep getting in the way and now I've bitten into a BIG project, and I'll just have to see it through...
Tails.jpg
lotsa_wings.png
Still, if we ever get out of lockdown, I'd be interested to see how far you got with the Zero...🤔
 

pylon500

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 26, 2003
Messages
403
Location
Taree Airport Australia
There is a 75% P-40 on Barnstormers. Ranger engine. No indication of type of construction.
P-40 Warhawk
P-40 WARHAWK • $59,000 • FOR SALE • P-40 Warhawk. 3/4 scale museum quality replica. TTSN 26 hours. Ranger in-line engine 10 hours SMOH. 3-bladed prop, retractable landing gear. Always hangered. Contact Bob for further details. Calgary, Alberta. (403) 650-2122 • Contact Robert James , Friend of Owner - located Whitefish, MT United States • Telephone: 403-650-2122 • Posted August 15, 2021 • Show all Ads posted by this AdvertiserRecommend This Ad to a FriendEmail AdvertiserSave to WatchlistReport This AdView Larger Images
Looks like a lot of work went into building that, I think the roughness adds a little realism, but looking at that wing section I'd fly it with a lot of caution...
 

PiperCruisin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2017
Messages
245
Location
Idaho
I'll say that from my experience I've had a few Korean friends from college question my idea to potentially build a replica Zero (as an opponent to the P-36 or Hellcat) which would have the big Imperial meatball on the side.

For them the thought perks up as a little painful more than in other parts of the world. Then again, they did question my idea to build an aircraft in general, and particularly one that looks like a warplane, so there's probably some nuances of context that is not shared across the cultures and lifestyles. But I remember one saying "might not want to put the red circle on it."
One could paint their plane whatever they want, realistic replica, pseudo war machine, or florescent green. Either way, it starts with the plane. Look at the Reno racers that were war planes. Love the Scalebirds paint scheme, but I respect the engineering a lot more.
 

Rowdy Yates

Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2021
Messages
20
There is a 75% P-40 on Barnstormers. Ranger engine. No indication of type of construction.
P-40 Warhawk
I'd honestly sell my left nut for that! 😃!
(Might have to repaint 'er a little? I don't mind the RAF No.112 Squadron markings, might have to switch to 12th USAAF DAF markings... 😉)

I had a chance a few years back to get a Loehl P-40 out here, couldn't scrape up enough money to get it at the time. Old man who built it did a beautiful job! Had to sell it after he got cancer. 😞

P-40 WARHAWK • $59,000 • FOR SALE • P-40 Warhawk. 3/4 scale museum quality replica. TTSN 26 hours. Ranger in-line engine 10 hours SMOH. 3-bladed prop, retractable landing gear. Always hangered. Contact Bob for further details. Calgary, Alberta. (403) 650-2122 • Contact Robert James , Friend of Owner - located Whitefish, MT United States • Telephone: 403-650-2122 • Posted August 15, 2021 • Show all Ads posted by this AdvertiserRecommend This Ad to a FriendEmail AdvertiserSave to WatchlistReport This AdView Larger Images
 
Last edited:
Top