Replica home builts

Discussion in 'Hangar Flying' started by Little Scrapper, Mar 11, 2019.

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  1. Mar 14, 2019 #81

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    A Flitzer biplane could easily be done up as a faux WW1 replica, since its entire existence is already based on a faux 1920's inter-war biplane :)

    Baslee's DH-2 pusher (Sharon Starks owns it IIRC) is unique and really well done. Just gorgeous and "something different".

    There really ought to be more of those, unless there is some unexpected problem with how it flies.
     
  2. Mar 14, 2019 #82

    ScaleBirdsScott

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    That Laird is a clean bird with good proportions. I dig it.
     
  3. Mar 14, 2019 #83

    Riggerrob

    Riggerrob

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    If you want to replicate a German, multi-engine bomber, visit the Canadian Air and Space Museum at Ottawa/Rockcliff Airport.
    They have a beautifully restored AEG G.IV twin-engined bomber.
    Nearby is the only surviving Junkers J 1 ground-attack biplane which way ter sets me more. It was the first all-metal airplane to enter production. The corrugated were my skin is would be the most different components to replicate and I would delete most of the armour (surrounding the cockpit and engine me) to save weight.
     
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  4. Mar 14, 2019 #84

    Aesquire

    Aesquire

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    Holy grail plane? Wow. Too subjective.

    Fokker Dr.I & Sopwith Camel would be the Peanuts influenced popular choices.

    I vote for the Fokker D.VIII as the last with the best nick name. The Flying Razor.
    & The Sopwith Triplane. A dead end, but very successful, and the inspiration for the more Famed Fokker.

    Both are available as kits (Fokker) or plans (Sopwith). Neither is "really original" in part because of lack of engine availability when the replicas were designed.

    The Rotec and Verner radials available today make a "looking good" replica easier today, but at a cost. The Jacobs, etc. radials used in the 40-50s are even more expensive, now. And if you win the lotto, you can get a brand new rotary from the Aussies. It's metal porn.

    Years ago the Fokker D.VIII was recreated with correspondence with the designer. My copy of the article is buried. Surely some here know the story.

    And 2 original engines for an Albatross were found in the corner of an East German warehouse. 2 replicas were built, ( both now in museums, but we're flown ) and The build log is well worth the hours to read. Wood porn!

    [video]https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=frvYnELUh44[/video]

    The real problem with WW1 airplanes is that....as airplanes, they were pretty bad. Let's be honest.

    Air racers from a later time, however, can be great flying machines. True, the most famous, like the Bee Gee Model R Super Sportster, required demi god flying skills and discipline to survive, but there's a lot of them that were not deadly beyond belief.

    Just normally deadly. Like most of the small planes we love.
     
  5. Mar 15, 2019 #85

    Mcmark

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    Lynn Williams the Flitzer designer has been working on a Laird Speedwing version. Has nice lines.
    I got locked out of Yahoo so can’t follow its progress.
     
  6. Mar 15, 2019 #86

    TFF

    TFF

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    The ugly truth about replicas is engines. What are you going to power the thing with. With some of the small radials there is some hope, but most civilian airplanes until the advent of the opposed four are good size airplanes. Some reasons were structural and aerodynamic, but most was the engines with power were big and heavy. If you really build something super nice, someone like Kermit Weeks would buy it up and find an engine for it. Not homebuilt, but restoring a Monocoupe or a Rearwind is a worthy project. Can be cheap enough and it brings real history back to life. Same skills. Without some magical engine fairy, looking late 30s for dawn of 4 cylinder planes is really more realistic. Personally I think there needs to be another Knight Twister made.
     
  7. Mar 15, 2019 #87

    blane.c

    blane.c

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    Why couldn't you put a normal engine in it and faux some cylinders around to make it look proper?
     
  8. Mar 15, 2019 #88

    TFF

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    In Italy there is the last Fokker EV/DVIII fuselage. In a museum and I believe there is a wing being made now for it. There have been a few replicas. In the 60s there were a lot of WW1 replicas coming out of Flabob. I know one was built there. I don’t remember if that one was part of the Champlain Fighter Museum collection or a different one. About ten years ago Achiem Engels built three at once; probably the best to date. There was a US replica at Oshkosh a couple years ago flying. One of my favorites.
     
  9. Mar 15, 2019 #89

    dougwanderson

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    English wren motor glider 1434614181806.jpg
     
  10. Mar 15, 2019 #90

    BJC

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    Tom, I’m not sure that either one of us would fit in a KT.


    BJC
     
  11. Mar 15, 2019 #91

    TFF

    TFF

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    Faked engines are done, and for regular weekend flying it’s OK. The planes tend to fly better spinning those original big props so the handling can be off. A Dr1 or Camel with an original engine only needs about 300 ft to take off. There are three companies making rotary radial replicas; for the favored. With a Lycoming or Continental almost always bneed nose ballast, just to get the plane to it’s designed tailheavy ness. A couple of years ago there was a long thread of making a Pup and Spad for a flying museum. They went for 4130 fuselages and I think the Pup has a a Lycoming and the Spad has a Continental. I believe they fly them every weekend. Always subjective but the really close replicas have a decent value where as the looks good but only skin deep ones are only worth something to the builder, not the open market.
     
  12. Mar 15, 2019 #92

    Little Scrapper

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    I am reading everyone's posts, just an FYI. Thank you.


    I tend to think similar to what TFF thinks, especially his views on replicas. I don't have much interest in scale stuff with VW's or Suzuki engines.

    I think a replica, if that were the path, would need to be as absolutely perfect a copy as possible for myself to really be "all in".

    If I went experimental home but non replica it would need to be unique. I've always loved a Pitts, always. But if I were to do one it would be so, it would be like the Pitts #1. That would be worth pursuing in my opinion. Something dead simple, light, bland, you get the picture.
    FB_IMG_1542777083439.jpg

    I'm not saying I'd build a Dyke Delta but it's a good example of a pretty cool airplane that there's a shortage of and would be neat to build the greatest flying example ever made to date.

    A Rose Parrakeet (spelling?) Is another neat airplane where it's a pretty good challenge and there's very few of them. I have plans for one, they really suck......which I actually like.

    Knight Twister. Yeah, that's a gosh darn awesome awesome example of a airplane we need more of. It seems like a seriously hot flying airplane so I'm cautious about something like that.

    Pitts 12? Probably lots of those and I'm pretty sure out of my budget.

    I regret selling off my Cassutt. I'll put that down as another mistake I made. I don't have the heart to do that over again.

    What else?
     
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  13. Mar 15, 2019 #93

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    A fella I know built a Travelair Biplane from scratch and he took me up in it. It was a flawless replica. I'm sure some of you remember it in Sport Aviation. He also built 2 Piper PA12 SuperCruisers from scratch. Flawless.

    Always thought that was good.
     
  14. Mar 15, 2019 #94

    TFF

    TFF

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    Only getting out is the problem! The one being restored over at the Biplane Forum is one of the mid size wing ones. The owner had a S1-S and he is pretty regular sized. It’s getting a constant speed O-360. He acquired a second airframe too. The one beauty of scratch building is just make it fit you. As you know the Pitts was extended by 3 inches, twice. The first revision was added because everyone was adding it and Pitts pretty much said he needed to update the drawings to what people were building. The Herendeen Pitts was built by a local. After N66Y was sold they built two more with I think 12 in longer fuselages. One for dad. One for mom. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=W8xczpXA-Jg may not be what a competition pilot wants but it can’t be all bad.
     
  15. Mar 15, 2019 #95

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    Can't help but wonder what it would be like to fly a minimalist spartan light weight Pitts.

    FB_IMG_1552614144838.jpg

    Skyote is another unique airplane where you hear how great it is yet you never see or hear about them.
     
  16. Mar 15, 2019 #96

    Tench745

    Tench745

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    Skyotes are apparently a pretty complex little ship. My dad just joined the EAA chapter down in Rock Hill and one of their members has one. I know little about it except that it is gorgeous... and there's a spare welded fuselage in the hangar.
     
  17. Mar 15, 2019 #97

    Little Scrapper

    Little Scrapper

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    I've heard it's a very challenging build.
     
  18. Mar 15, 2019 #98

    radfordc

    radfordc

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    The DH-2 is sitting in Robert's shop. I think it hasn't been flown since Harvey test flew it and recommended it not be flown again. I think something about top speed and stall speed being too close together.
     
  19. Mar 15, 2019 #99

    Victor Bravo

    Victor Bravo

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    Jeez... my old model builder instincts are way off. I was convinced that the DH-2 would be a good flyer just by looking at the proportions, areas, and shapes. Perhaps the the V-twin engine was not providing enough power and the cruise was just not accelerating past the stall speed. But if that was the case they could have installed more power and resolved that issue.
     
  20. Mar 15, 2019 #100

    blane.c

    blane.c

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    Curtiss CW-3

    Curtiss CW-3.jpg
     

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