Renewing tools

Discussion in 'Workshop Tips and Secrets / Tools' started by tangocharlie123, Apr 10, 2010.

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  1. Apr 10, 2010 #1

    tangocharlie123

    tangocharlie123

    tangocharlie123

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    Hi All

    After a massive Hail storm here I had two tool boxes full of tools that got filled with water and the tools have gone rusty.

    How would you rejuvinate them.

    some are chrome valadium coated others are just steel.

    with thanks..

    Peter
     
  2. Apr 10, 2010 #2

    snaildrake

    snaildrake

    snaildrake

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    Oh boy, sorry to hear that. There are some ways to get most simple tools like wrenches back. I hope you laid them out to dry as soon as you found them.
    If there are joints (pliers) or mechanisms (ratchets) it's much harder. Anti-corrosion penetrants like Super-PBlaster (sic?) might help, given enough time.
    On plated tools like end wrenches with just surface rust I'd burnish them on a wire wheel running either on a bench grinder or just an electric drill.
    For rusted carbon steel, naval jelly is your friend (find at hardware store, Home Depot). Follow the directions to let it soak in and react with the oxides - this usually takes repetition. Good luck
     
  3. Apr 10, 2010 #3

    Tom Nalevanko

    Tom Nalevanko

    Tom Nalevanko

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    Recently I took a bunch of rusty tools and put them on a piece of cardboard and sprayed them with WD-40. Couple days later turned them over and sprayed them again. Then, one by one, I sprayed and exercised whatever moves, like pliers. The tools may still look a bit rusty but they seem to work OK. WD-40 is pretty cheap and does the job.
     
  4. Apr 12, 2010 #4

    MadRocketScientist

    MadRocketScientist

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    Here is another option that might work, although you would need to neutralize the acid solution remaining on the tools and oil them after the process.
    Electrolytic Rust Removal aka Magic


    Shannon.
     
  5. Apr 12, 2010 #5

    Rom

    Rom

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    From what I understand, the solution is alkaline and if an iron anode is used the waste water can be dumped on the lawn. It's good for the grass. The process actually converts rust back into iron. Electrolysis - Rust Removal
     
  6. Apr 14, 2010 #6

    MadRocketScientist

    MadRocketScientist

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    My mistake, I intend to use this process to clean the rust from off some railway line I have laying around. Then I can make a large C frame rivet squeezer out of it. I guess that would sorta count as my tools having rust on them:gig:

    Shannon.
     

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