Quicksilver MX Sprint II Project

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Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
1,437
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Germantown, WI USA
So I picked up a Sprint II project from the estate of one of our UL chapter members recently. For the uninitiated, it's a 2-seater SBS with a Rotax 582 and wire-braced single-surface wings. It also came with a composite 5-blade prop - Kiev, I believe. The wings were re-covered and have been in storage since then, still wrapped in plastic from the shop that did the work. It also came with a bubble canopy of some sort, but not sure I'll use it. Time will tell.

I also purchased a set of Full Lotus floats with it sight unseen, but have been told by others familiar with them that they're in good shape but missing a couple of landing gear parts. Looking forward to picking them up soon.

Quicksilver Aircraft was quick to turn around an assembly manual for me which will be invaluable as I learn what I have (or don't). Thankfully the airplane was N-numbered, so I just submitted the registration paperwork to Oklahoma City for processing.

Not sure how much work I'll get done on it over the winter since it's in an unheated hangar. But we'll see how far I get. Since it's been assembled in a past life, much of it is already together. It's just a matter of making sure the hardware is up to snuff and current. The plane was registered in 2010, but beyond that I have no idea what its history is. Log books are empty. But it has an airworthiness certificate, so that makes my job a little easier.

I foresee fun flying ahead!

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Joined
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Messages
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After a long winter and a springtime of other projects, I was bound and determined to figure out how many hours are on this airframe and engine. Knowing it hasn’t flown since 2010, there are many unknowns. The wiring is a mess, so I couldn’t power it up on the airframe. So I took the EIS home, fabbed a test cable for it, and powered it up with a power tool battery (EIS supports 12V and 24V electrics). She lives! And now I know how many hours it has.

Now to clean up the electrical before doing anything else. This would be 1000% more difficult with the wings on.

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Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
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With a friend, we checked all the wires in the harness from the panel and EIS. All checked good and were temporarily labeled with some blue painter’s tape. I ordered a heat shrink tubing labeler from Amazon and will get them properly labeled shortly after arrival. I’ll probably replace those white plastic terminal connectors with something that will accept ring terminals. Heat shrink ring terminals with inner wall melt are super easy to find now. No reason not to make the extra effort.

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Joined
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Messages
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Got my overhaul order back from LEAF for the 582. They said it was odd because it looks to have been overhauled at one point but there was a fair amount of corrosion internally. That jives with it having sat for over ten years, but it also means that the previous overhaul is going to get overhauled. Expensive work, but it will be as good as new when I get it back and ready for another 300 hours of adventure.
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
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Germantown, WI USA
My friend was jonesing for something to do on a Tuesday night, so he came over and helped me move the Sprint project to the front of the garage.

I’ve begun disassembly and inspection of airframe looking for corrosion, bolts that are worn, oblong holes, and all the other things that goes with a project plane that hasn’t flown for many years. One section at a time cleaning, degreasing, removing surface rust from steel parts, and seeing what needs a repaint.

So far most everything has been structurally sound. Some bolts in high stress areas are showing signs of wear. I’ve ordered a complete fastener set from AirTech at Bever’s suggestion at last year’s QS service talk at OSH and will be going through the plane and replacing those that need it.

New exhaust is in as well, so will be getting that ready for remounting soon. Not until after the big show, though. A fella has to have priorities.

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Joined
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Took the dilapidated band brakes off and replaced with hydraulics. Match drilling that axle was an exercise, no doubt. But used factory holes and life is good. Put some fatties on in the process. The plane has the extended steerable nose fork so has a nice 13-inch tire up front as well. Should be a good combo. The extra holes are where the band brake bracket was. The bolt is temporary while I get the right length. There’s some airplane show starting this week that has places to get those bolts, so I’ve heard. :)

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I attended a session at #OSH22 about Annual Inspecting Your Ultralight. On the topic of what to look for when buying a used machine, the short story was take it apart, clean it thoroughly, inspect every bolt, every hole, and assume that the machine is out to kill you. Never were truer words spoken this evening. Probably won’t kill me, but it needs attention. I’m gonna need a little more time.

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I wasn’t too happy with the way I drilled my axles with my brake upgrade. Since I drilled them off aircraft, the holes didn’t line up well. I drilled them in place after the fact, but it widened the holes, created potential stress risers, and all the stuff we don’t want on our landing apparatus. So I bought new axles and set out to build a better mousetrap.

So I created a match drilling jig from a hunk of 2x4. Drilled a hole with a 1-1/2 inch Forsner bit to match the tubing. Then I drilled two bolt holes along side the large one. Using a table saw I ripped the board in half. Now I had a clamp I can use as a guide.

With one side centered on the hole, I drilled through the first half using the axle tube and axle bushing factory holes as a guide. I then bolted the halves together and match drilled from the other side. Now I have a lot more support when drilling through the axle shaft to keep things aligned.

Inserted the axle shaft up to the magic spot, and drilled slowly through. Voila! Beautifully aligned.

This was only durable enough for one set of axles, though. I could see where the bit wandered a little while drilling. If I were to do something more durable for production use, I’d consider Delrin or even aluminum.

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Joined
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Messages
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On a whim, I picked up a spot blaster from HF to see if I could clean up the steel parts on my Quicksilver seat frame and related tubing. While it performed decently so I could get a view of the underlying metal, it really didn’t have the horsepower to clean things up fantastically. But the great news is the condition of the tubing is really good. I scoped the tubes revealing just a little bit of surface corrosion on the inside. As hoped, there is a weep hole in the low point that allowed any excessive moisture to escape.

So instead of spending more money on a bigger sandblasting rig — coupled with my time — I’m going to bring it to a pro shop to get them properly cleaned and refinished. After that I’ll probably flow some rust converter through the tubes just for peace of mind. Probably unnecessary, though.

More positive progress in my book! Looking into the Ospho technique. I’m not familiar with that process.

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Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
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@BBerson and another builder friend suggested I try a twisted wire wheel on a grinder within a half hour of one another. Since two rights can’t be wrong, Menards received sixteen more of my hard-earned dollars and I came home with a spinning wheel of wonder. It did great work in short order as described! And was a heck of a lot less messy. Thanks for the direction! Now let’s give ‘er a wipe down and a coat of black tractor paint.

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