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Pusher twin boom and pod mash up from Calidus gyro???

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TahoeTim

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Too much coffee and bacon this morning...

Take a Calidus gyro, remove the rotor and tail boom and bolt on a twin boom high wing assembly. That would be one very beautiful LSA :)

Who wants to photoshop one together for me?
 

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mcrae0104

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Something like this perhaps?

wizard.jpg

Someone just posted something about a Wizard, and when I looked it up it reminded me of your idea here.
 

gdes

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The Sadler Vampire single place is a shoulder wing, looks very cool and is close to the 1st rendering.

But, I think you had something like this in mind: DSCF0025.jpg

Rendered using Stone-age Photoshop TRF, (Tracing, Ruler and Freehand)
 
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mcrae0104

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Neat little plane. Are those cooling air intakes at the wing root?
 

Vigilant1

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How much extra web area is there on a twin boom comparing to a conventional tail?
A single tail boom under the pusher prop would probably result in a lighter, simpler, and more easily- built airframe. The engine and prop need to be mounted higher, but this means the top of the prop disk is above the wing and incoming air isn't obstructed. The negative is that there will be some pitch change with power changes.
 

autoreply

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Here you go Tim. My skills in 3d are fairly limited, but this was general layout.

View attachment 45997
That looks awesome. Any detailed work going on?
A single tail boom under the pusher prop would probably result in a lighter, simpler, and more easily- built airframe.
Not necessarily. My tail booms actually come out considerably lighter as a single tail boom would have been.

Buckling is the issue. If we look at the typical C172, ignoring buckling, skin thickness with carbon would have been on the order of 100 micron, or 2 human hairs stacked on top of each other. Throw in minimum skin thickness and sleeker tails, even as small as the 5-10" dia end up considerably lighter, especially in composites.

Structurally they're no doubt a lot harder to analyze, not entirely convinced they're any more complex (parts count in for example controls) compared to a conventional design.
 
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