• If you have bought, sold or gained information from our Classifieds, please donate to HomeBuiltAirplanes and give back.

    You can become a Supporting Member which comes with a decal or just click here to donate.

Pulsar Aircraft Assets For Sale

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
559
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Greetings All,

I read in the back of my most recent Kitplanes Magazine that the assets of the Pulsar Aircraft Company are for sale.
This includes the Pulsar XP, KRS-100, Super Pulsar 100, and Pulsar 600. This includes the molds, demonstrator aircraft along with all the required tooling.

Two caveats to consider.

The first is I have it on good authority that the molds are in pitiful shape. My source took a look at them and this was 10 or so years ago so one can imagine how they might look today.

The second caveat is the current owner is asking 2 million dollars for the whole shooting match.

I feel that is a mighty steep price all things considered.

In my humble opinion, I feel the market is ripe for a resurgence of the Pulsar as long as the kit were to remain an affordable alternative. I think the Super Pulsar was what the Pulsar line should have been from the get go. The XP, I feel, is just a tad bit small for the average sized man of 6' tall and weight of anywhere from 180-210 pounds

Just wanted to make anyone aware that didn't already know. If I were ten years younger I might be inclined to negotiate.

Hope all are doing well.

Safe Skies,

Yellowhammer
 

ToddK

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jan 13, 2016
Messages
569
Location
Shweaty Texas
The pulsar is a captivating design. However, I can't imagine that a person could sell 2 million in kits soon enough to make their money back in a reasonable amount of time.
 

BoKu

Pundit
HBA Supporter
Joined
Aug 15, 2013
Messages
2,965
Location
Western US
Um, yeah, no. I'd value it at the going price for the demonstrator aircraft plus scrap value of the tooling and fixtures. The cost of reverse-engineering the fabrication sequence and techniques, plus the cost of reestablishing market position plus the cost of building a distribution network probably adds up to more than you would ever recoup from reintroducing a 30 year old design.

If there are high-value replacement parts in the deal (canopy transparencies, undercarriage assemblies, engines, etc), those might sweeten the deal, but they are likely all long gone. Unless demonstrated otherwise, this deal is all sizzle, no meat.
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
559
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
The pulsar is a captivating design. However, I can't imagine that a person could sell 2 million in kits soon enough to make their money back in a reasonable amount of time.

Totally agree. Like I said, the Super Pulsar and Pulsar 600 could actually compete in todays market. The Pulsar I and XP, not so much. You would have to turn them out like Model T's to make any type of profit.

What they should do is let the Pulsar Group acquire some of the much needed parts molds for the canopy and the like cheap so they fix their aircraft.

If someone busts a part as it stands currently, they will have to make a one off or find someone who either wrecked theirs or never completed their kit.

Hope your doing well Todd!

Yellowhammer
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
15,865
Location
Memphis, TN
For how much? That would require real proof of a revenue. Airplane and $25,000. It would require real inventory for it to be worth more.
 

cluttonfred

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 13, 2010
Messages
8,699
Location
World traveler
Back in the 1980s, I loved the original Rotax 582-powered Pulsar, a sort of baby Lancair or Glasair at a time when rag-and-tube Avid/Kitfox types dominated the lower cost bracket of kit aircraft. As in so many things, including homebuilt aircraft, the market and technology have evolved but the original concept is still sound. If Aeromomentum or anyone else can bring a reliable, affordable, and not-too-heavy modern 3-cylinder auto engine conversion to market, then a little composite kit to get good performance on modest power would, I think, be welcome.
 
Last edited:

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
559
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
Back in the 1980s, I loved the original Rotax 582-powered Pulsar, a sort of baby Lancair or Glasair at a time when rag-and-tube Avid/Kitfox types dominated the lower cost bracket of kit aircraft. As in so many things, including homebuilt aircraft, the market and technology have evolved but the original concept is still sound. If Aeromomentum or anyone else can bring a reliable, affordable, and not-too-heavy modern 3-cylinder auto engine conversion, then a little composite kit to get good performance on modest power would, I think, be welcome.


Agreed!
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
559
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
My goal with the Pulsar I I am building is to make the nicest one out there. I am completely focused on safety and keeping the weight down but I want it to be plush as possible and comfortable. I am even considering making it a one place for better performance and to achieve my goals.
 

aeromomentum

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
175
Location
Stuart, FL USA
I used to work for Rich Trickel and Tri-R as an engineer before it was sold. This was in 1999. At that time the molds for the 4 seat were in fair condition but the molds to the 2 seat were in poor condition at best. But that was over 20 years ago. My understanding is the molds have been stored outside for about the last 5 years, since Mrs. Dagani sold the hangar where they were stored. Mark Trickel (Rich's younger brother) and I approached Mrs. Dagani about the time the molds were being moved outside and the asking price was not realistic not even counting in the logistical issues/costs. There are also other complexities to this sale.

The TR1 and TR4 are fantastic aircraft. Both have a great balance of speed, landing distance, economy, room and comfort. The follow on aircraft to the TR4 is the Volato 400. Volato This was designed by a group with Rich in Brazil. I helped with the structural engineering. They also have a 2 seat called the Volato 200 that is an all new design that I helped with the design and engineering. There are both LSA versions and performance versions.

Currently I fly a TR4 and am working on restoring another TR4 that had an engine fire. In the past I flew my TR1 from coast to coast and border to border.
 

Yellowhammer

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
559
Location
Born In Alabama, reside: Louisiana (unfortunately)
I used to work for Rich Trickel and Tri-R as an engineer before it was sold. This was in 1999. At that time the molds for the 4 seat were in fair condition but the molds to the 2 seat were in poor condition at best. But that was over 20 years ago. My understanding is the molds have been stored outside for about the last 5 years, since Mrs. Dagani sold the hangar where they were stored. Mark Trickel (Rich's younger brother) and I approached Mrs. Dagani about the time the molds were being moved outside and the asking price was not realistic not even counting in the logistical issues/costs. There are also other complexities to this sale.

The TR1 and TR4 are fantastic aircraft. Both have a great balance of speed, landing distance, economy, room and comfort. The follow on aircraft to the TR4 is the Volato 400. Volato This was designed by a group with Rich in Brazil. I helped with the structural engineering. They also have a 2 seat called the Volato 200 that is an all new design that I helped with the design and engineering. There are both LSA versions and performance versions.

Currently I fly a TR4 and am working on restoring another TR4 that had an engine fire. In the past I flew my TR1 from coast to coast and border to border.



Aero-momentum,

Many thanks for posting this information. I agree with you regarding the TR series of aircraft. Very nice airframes indeed.

I would very much like to see any pictures of the Voloto Series of Aircraft if you have any and would not mind posting them. I am always interested in seeing new designs. Was it constructed from composite materials or aluminum?

Again, thank you sir for sharing your knowledge with the group.

Sincerely and Respectfully,

Yellowhammer
 

12notes

Well-Known Member
Lifetime Supporter
Log Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2014
Messages
1,254
Location
Louisville, KY
There are 204 Pulsars on the aircraft registration database. At $2,000,000, you would need to sell an equal number of kits with $9,800 of profit on each to break even, on a kit that sold for $18,000 (in 1998) and which has had 15 completions in the last 10 years. Adjusting the price for inflation (53%) to $27,500, that would require a 35% margin. Assuming the 15 completions represents a 10% completion rate, that you could ressurect interest in on old design to the previous level, that you successfully do that and restart manufacturing while keeping a 35% margin (doubtful), and your time is completely valueless, it would still take 13.6 years to make your money back.

Factoring in the time and effort to restore the molds and get manufacturing built up, a reasonable price in my opinion would be $100,000, except that he would have to pay me to take the business off his hands. With that sort of initial capital, I would expect that after 5 years of hard work, the business would make me a thousandaire, maybe even a ten-thousandaire, with a little luck, enough to be able to afford a kit for myself.
 
Top