Project Bush Demon

Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum

Help Support Homebuilt Aircraft & Kit Plane Forum:

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
I have heard of these, the problem with them is they will sometimes deploy with a cross wind.... and I believe they also use gravity. Once the forward momentum falls below a certain speed they deploy by sliding forward off the wing and the rear of the slat lifts, once your back at speed the air pressure on the leading edge pushes them back in place stowing them.... at least that is my understanding on how they work. I may be wrong.... would have to look closer than I did at the design than what I found on a brief search. But problems reported on them was in a cross wind the windward side wing might deploy when you don't want it too. I do t think this would cause a crash but could make handling a pain until you get turned back into the wind and get it stowed again. If your flying low and don't want them deployed it could be a problem.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
I am hoping AeroMomentum, will come to this thread to talk with me. He said somethings on another thread that impressed me, and I know there will be those who disagree with me on this, but I am thinking I found my power plant for this design. I can get real world thrust numbers and with that I can calculate weight, wing surface area, lift, and really get into the nuts and bolts of this... hate to say it but I am getting excited. When I get finished with this design, I am hoping to get all the numbers, and I heard of a university I think in Utah that can take this info and do a computer analysis of the design, airflow and lift.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
Okay, I have to add this here! I just got finished with a conversation with a CFI! He prices are affordable.... his rate is 45 an hour and the plane is 145 an hour Wet... may only be a few hours a week, but it is a start, and once I get to where I can Solo, I am only paying the for the plane. He also has a flight simulator... so I can have that going as well. My prayers are answered! I am going to learn to fly... every other school I contacted was between 200 and 300 for the plane and 75 to 125 for instruction. That is expensive. He has a 172g. For his trainer plane... I am excited!
 

blane.c

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
4,832
Location
capital district NY
Okay, I have to add this here! I just got finished with a conversation with a CFI! He prices are affordable.... his rate is 45 an hour and the plane is 145 an hour Wet... may only be a few hours a week, but it is a start, and once I get to where I can Solo, I am only paying the for the plane. He also has a flight simulator... so I can have that going as well. My prayers are answered! I am going to learn to fly... every other school I contacted was between 200 and 300 for the plane and 75 to 125 for instruction. That is expensive. He has a 172g. For his trainer plane... I am excited!
Just be advised 40hrs is a minimum and the national average is about 1/2 again as many hrs more or less.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
Yeah, if you're not proficient in 40 hrs you need a different instructor.
according to the FAA most pilots fly between 65 to 70 hours before taking their check ride. Are you saying the majority of the CFI's are incompetent?

I think I will take my time, and fly as many hours as it takes to be comfortable to pass the check ride.. thanks
 

Voidhawk9

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Mar 26, 2012
Messages
586
Location
Timaru, NZ
If you drag it out, you spend a lot of hours on currency. If you do it reasonably quickly, it can be done on the minimum hours with good competency if you have good instructors.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
9,250
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
NO, the majority of instructors are probably not incompetent, but the amount of regulatory and other crap they have to teach today... in addition to how to actually fly the airplane... is higher than it was when the 40 hour rule was written.

DEFINITELY try a few hours with that instructor and that airplane. Within a few hours you will see whether you enjoy the flying, whether you have the ability to learn it, etc.
 

blane.c

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
4,832
Location
capital district NY
It is going to go fastest if you have the FAA written done first as this allows the CFI to build upon and reinforce the information you need to know to be a pilot, conversely having the instructor teach you something you have never heard of before while in the process of learning to fly is going to make it more difficult, take longer and with consequence make it more expensive. It is simple show up to learn to fly as best prepared as you can be.

Everyone learns differently based on life experience. Obviously some one who grew up around airports and airplanes is likely to find it easier than others.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
NO, the majority of instructors are probably not incompetent, but the amount of regulatory and other crap they have to teach today... in addition to how to actually fly the airplane... is higher than it was when the 40 hour rule was written.
Remember, your talking to the guy who started designing a plane as a mental exercise.... lol. I am already buying books, downloading apps, and listening to ATC communications, and practicing how to talk to the tower. Studying every single bit of info I can get my hands on and I have not even taken my first lesson... lol.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,983
Location
Memphis, TN
I would not worry about drawing it out. This is a different game and sometimes marinating is helpful. So what if the first lesson is really 6, no real clock, 40 hours may be minimum, but only competency count to get a license. Once you have your legs, you can take a lesson and tell the CFI you just want to fly around for an hour or do something you want, you are buying the time. Doing it well is called practice; the CFI is there to keep you safe and have an opinion of how well things are going as much as lesson plans. As long as your not trying to kill them, just have fun. There is plenty of time for regular lessons. You might be one to never get a license but flies with a CFI buddy everywhere.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
So, here is a rough sketch on the shape of my wing. 5 foot chord, 6 inches from chord to top of wing, three inches from chord to bottom, total of 9 inches of thickness. Main spar is centered on crest of the wing, and is the CG of the plane.
 

Attachments

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,983
Location
Memphis, TN
What is the thought process? Round spar and big open area on the rib. These things have been done for certain reasons before, but there are trade offs.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
What is the thought process? Round spar and big open area on the rib. These things have been done for certain reasons before, but there are trade offs.
Round spar with aluminum I beam inside adding strength. Wooden ribs, the open areas reduce weight, while retaining strength. I plan on using Flaperons, I am going to limit their deployment to 15 degrees and the leading edge slats. Also putting a 2 degree dihedral in the wing to help keep the plane stabilized.

That was a rough drawing once I get my draft table cleared. The proper draft will be much cleaner.
 

Victor Bravo

Well-Known Member
HBA Supporter
Joined
Jul 30, 2014
Messages
9,250
Location
KWHP, Los Angeles CA, USA
Round spar with aluminum I beam inside adding strength. Wooden ribs, the open areas reduce weight, while retaining strength.
Study how the Kolb wings are built. They use a round aluminum tube spar, with "I-beam type" inserts (actually Kolb calls them H braces) at the highest stress locations.

The structural design of the Kolb wing WORKS and there are several hundred of them flying that are proven to be reasonably safe. That's a big deal, trust me. So using their design as a start, and fixing the one or two small issues that Kolb wings have, will put you in a fairly good place.

If you do use an aluminum tube spar, then the Kolb aluminum rib is a very very good balance between the built-up "wood stick" rib and the traditional stamped aluminum rib. You get 90% of the weight savings of the wood rib, but you cut the construction time by a factor of four or five compared to a wood rib. You also get to install the rib with rivets, because gluing a wood rib to an aluminum spar will be very time-consuming and not reliable.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
Study how the Kolb wings are built. They use a round aluminum tube spar, with "I-beam type" inserts (actually Kolb calls them H braces) at the highest stress locations.
Will check that out.... I had some ideas on using aluminum bulkheads through the fuselage. Cutting them out with a plasma cutter and using a bead roller to add strength. From what you describe, this may not be that much different.
 

TFF

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2010
Messages
14,983
Location
Memphis, TN
Just consider available materials. If you can’t get certain materials, it’s not very useable.

There is a design called the Pegazair you might look at for some inspiration.
 

Arkan

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2021
Messages
76
Here is a question.... how difficult is it to insure a home built?
 
Top