PPL written exam...

Discussion in 'Rules and Regulations / Flight Safety / Better Pil' started by MadProfessor8138, Oct 8, 2019.

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  1. Oct 8, 2019 #1

    MadProfessor8138

    MadProfessor8138

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    I know this issue has been covered many times but things change over time and I feel the topic could stand to be addressed again for the individuals that are currentlt in the process of earning their PPL.

    So...... 2 questions.

    1. In your opinion,what is the best course to study for preparing to take the written test ?
    A. King....I have the King course and find their humor to be almost intolerable to set through.
    B. Sporty's....I have no experience with their material.
    C. Dauntless....I've heard that the course is excellent but have also read reviews that the program frequently crashes and customer support is rude or non-existant....which is sad because it also has great reviews.
    D. Gleim.....no experience with the material.
    E. Others..... ???

    2. I've read that learning all of the material and taking the written test will not guarantee you to pass.
    Instead,get a course that will teach you how to take the test and pass while basically forgetting about learning all of the information because the majority of it is incorrect to begin with.
    Is just studying the answers the better way to pass the test ?


    I would like to get my written test out of the way in the next few months but,honestly,I'm having trouble with the way the FAA has composed their exam :
    All answers are wrong but you need to pick the least wrong answer.

    Which course would help me the most towards passing the written ?
    Opinions please......

    Kevin
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
  2. Oct 8, 2019 #2

    TFF

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    I used ASA book and computer program. I’m not a fan of Gleam but you might like it better. Mark the book for the correct answer and go through it only reading the correct question/answer over and over until you recognize it. If you are reading it to gleam some information, it’s not there. Memorize and dump after test. Then learn the practical info. What is interesting is when you take the written the computer screen will not look like the practice. Don’t let that get you distracted.
     
  3. Oct 8, 2019 #3

    TFF

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    If you have to think about it, move to the next question when taking the test. Worry about the ones with trouble after you get the ones you know.
     
  4. Oct 8, 2019 #4

    glencessna

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    Well my info on the PPL written is dated. When I did it in the 70’s (OMG), I took a course, two evenings a week, through our flying club. The team like “we will get through this together” atmosphere was great for learning. I later taught the class several times and found the classroom interaction helped many students get over learning blocks.
    Perhaps a bit more relevant was my Instrument exam experience 15 years ago. I did it for the knowledge using a cd based program, sorry don’t remember which one. But I also used one of the Friday evening, all day Saturday, half day Sunday “Pass the test” classes. While I am sure I could have passed without the “Pass the test” class they offered a bunch of tricks that shortened the length of the actual test taking. Especially anything requiring calculations. Things like anything requiring time/distance calculations the answer always ends in “.3” ... unless it is this specific question whose answer is 27.7.
    I honestly do not know how the FAA has adjusted the test questions since then but I am sure the course folks have adapted.

    I have watched several of the Sporty’s videos and find them very good. Rod Machado’s courses are very good, if you can get past his quirky humor. I also have been pretty impressed with some of the videos I have seen from MZero, and their ground school ads seem pretty good.

    Bottom line I would try a local class through Community College, FBO etc. if you have the time. If not then any of the major players have good programs, just pick one that matches your personality. I would then follow up with a weekend “Pass the test” class. Keep in mind that when taking the test your object is to select the answer that the FAA wants, not the one that you or anybody else think is most correct. After you pass the test you can have the fight here on why the FAA’s answer was wrong.

    Good luck
     
  5. Oct 8, 2019 #5

    Toobuilder

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    +1 for marking (and memorizing) the correct answer ONLY. Once you have that locked in your short term memory, the answers on the test just jump out.

    And skip anything that doesn't click immediately.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2019 #6

    12notes

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    I studied on my own using the FAA books. I thought the Airplane Flying Handbook was quite readable, AIM less so. They also have the advantage of being the source material for what you'll be tested on.

    I used the ASA book for test prep, they somehow ended up having the actual questions and answers used on the FAA test. They informed you of updates if the questions changed, even if it was just one of the wrong answers that changed. The book includes 5 attempts of their online practice exams. I took other free online practice tests until I scored 90% on them, then took the ASA exams until I scored 90% on it, studying between every attempt. This made the actual test way less stressful, as I knew exactly what to expect.
     
  7. Oct 8, 2019 #7

    narfi

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    I do not think government published multiple choice tests are intended to determine how much you know, they are to determine if you care enough about the results to memorize the test.
    Orals and practicals (check-rides) are where they "hands on" decide if you know anything.

    imo it is a crappy system even though it favors people like me who are good test takers.
     
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  8. Oct 8, 2019 #8

    TFF

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    Yes it’s a jump through this hoop if you want to play exercise.
     
  9. Oct 8, 2019 #9

    MadProfessor8138

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    So,would I be correct in saying that the majority of you that have replied are of the opinion to not worry about the information and just memorize the test to pass ?
    And,once the written is out of the way,THEN start the studying to prepare for the check ride .

    Kevin
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
  10. Oct 8, 2019 #10

    radfordc

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    Good plan! Don't be Sheldon...
     
  11. Oct 8, 2019 #11

    TFF

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    Yes.
    I have a colleague that has a PHD and has studied like he is in a PHD program. It takes him a year to do what takes a month for the rest. He is having a dickens for his instrument because he wants it to be perfect. Reality is getting through lets you get the chance to practice. Otherwise you are stuck on the other side. It’s a process. The process is well documented. Detour and you will not make it.
     
  12. Oct 8, 2019 #12

    Pops

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    If you know how to take the test you will be very close to passing it. Add your knowledge on top of that, gives you your score.
    I studied 3 different courses for my PPL and didn't want to just memorize the answers. I wanted to know the subject. The instrument written test is the hardest one by far. All the rest of the test were easy.
    narfi is right, when you get to the orals and check-rides, you better know the subject. But if you do to good on the orals, the examiner always has trick questions that will stump you to bust your ego, to show you that you have a lot to learn.
     
  13. Oct 8, 2019 #13

    Rik-

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    Sporty's has a good online course.

    Gliem is supposed to be the best and in all honesty it's not that expensive.

    As others have said, just memorize the answers to the questions. You will never use this knowledge again in your life so don't take it for more than it is. Which is a barrier to entry to those that are to stupid to memorize the answers. This was a direct quote from the Oakland FSDO .
     
  14. Oct 9, 2019 #14

    Pops

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    The only problem with memorizing the test is latter when you are out there flying you may need to know some of that information. One reason we have so many poor pilots. Would you want your doctor to do the same thing ?
     
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  15. Oct 9, 2019 #15

    Rik-

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    What do they call a guy who finishes dead last in his medical class? Doctor!

    This isn't brain surgery, physic's fly the plane not us. He will learn navigation, fuel burn and time before the DPE rip's him for not knowing the basics. The written is just a achievement point whereby you can solo, with the medical card, and is really never brought up again.

    When is the last time you used the ground school test info? It's mundane and yes it's got some relevance but it's just a cog in the wheel of the process to getting a PPL. I can't remember the last time someone said "remember what we learned on the ground school test"?
     
  16. Oct 9, 2019 #16

    Pops

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    Maybe not in your world , but if you were flying with me things are a bit different. I know a flight instructor that doesn't know the difference between a mag switch and a master switch. I wouldn't let my cat fly with him.
     
  17. Oct 9, 2019 #17

    cdlwingnut

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    the king program is good. Yes the corny humor is hard to take, but when you get into the exam you will remember the corny joke and get the answer right. The sportys program is good too as it allows you to take practice exams.
     
  18. Oct 9, 2019 #18

    TFF

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    I agree you need to know the answers, but the way the written is done, there is no true right answers. In fact the way it’s done is down right unhelpful. Getting over the hurtle of the written allows you to concentrate on really learning the practical information. The Rod Machado book is ok for an outline to supplement the FAA book. He does lend a reason not just an explanation.

    I hated the FAA navigation questions as they are impractical. That was my throw away. You don’t navigate the way the questions are posed.
    The IA test is the only test they don’t publish the questions directly. The questions are in the bank of all FAA questions. Without some sort of guide or class it is practical impossible to pass today. At least there is no practical.

    Practical. Look over PT 119 for an explanation of what you will not be allowed to do with a Private License. You don’t have to know it directly but much of the private practical is making sure you understand what for hire is. Know your 91. In it will be inspections required for flight annual, 100 hr, transponder, Elt and inop instruments. Alcohol, and medical. Know your airspace. The working of the eye and health questions are big. Weight and balance.
     
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  19. Oct 9, 2019 #19

    cdlwingnut

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    The questions are not written the way you would do it in real life, but they are written in a why that makes you understand how to work the problem. The best advice for taking any FAA test is to write RFQ at the top of your scratch paper to remind you to Read the F--king Question. you have to read them carefully or they will bite you
     
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  20. Oct 9, 2019 #20

    Daleandee

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    Well ... yeah ... but ...



    On some of the questions it seemed all of the answers were correct but one answer would be MORE correct than the rest.

    Dale
    N319WF
     
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