Please PLEASE somebody give me the word !

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cluttonfred

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I stand by my comments on terminology, but there are always exceptions....

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Gotha WD.10 Ursinus fighter seaplane

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Loening OA

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Grumman J2F Duck
(Can you tell that Leroy Grumman used to work for Grover Loening?)

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Blackburn B-20

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Rutan SkiGull
 

Aesquire

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The Ursinus & Blackburn I'd rate as float planes. The shoehorn Loening line are flying boats, as is the Rutan.

Always wanted a Duck! Heroic history. Looks like a Hoot to fly. See the movie Murphy's War!
 

Martin W

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.

Just say ...

It is one of those float plane thingys

Everyone will kinda sorta know what you mean

.
 

cluttonfred

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Random thought…the Loening Amphibian/Grumman Duck layout has always appealed to me for an aluminum tube and Dacron fabric microlight, fiberglass shell lower hull, flotation bags, biplane or strut-braced monoplane wings…something the size and weight of the old Avid amphibians but with a modern four-stroke engine.
 

cluttonfred

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blane.c

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I thought it was funny, the C-130 on floats. C-130's are called by some the glass wing airplane due to the numerous spar patches, the suitability for seaplane use is dubious.
 

Riggerrob

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I thought it was funny, the C-130 on floats. C-130's are called by some the glass wing airplane due to the numerous spar patches, the suitability for seaplane use is dubious.
Yes, the RCAF used to fly some of the oldest C-130s but along the way they up-dated or replaced wing boxes, belly skins, etc. plus all the removeable components (engines, radios, flaps, landing gear, etc.) were over-hauled multiple times.

Similarly, the first time I ever saw a Sea King helicopter, it was up on jacks, getting its tail pylon hinge fittings replaced ('cus of cracks). During the 6 years that I wrenched on them, sheet metal specialists replaced transmission mounts, engine mounts, landing gear mounts, etc. Whenever they were over-hauled by IMP, their technicians started by drilling out all the rivets to remove belly skins, then steam-cleaning them to remove salt and corrosion.
Those airframes were like your grandfather's axe that had worn out two heads and three handles, but was still your grandfather's axe.

Sea planes always take a beating and are always maintenance intensive.
 

Riggerrob

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And since someone brought it up…and yes, it should read “seaplane” or “floatplane” not “flying boat”.

C-130's primary advantage is the cargo ramp under the tail. That ramp was pioneered by Fairchild of Canada's Husky bush/float plane immediately after World War 2. The hatch under the aft fuselage was big enough to launch a freight canoe!
 
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