Plan your workshop space carefully

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Little Scrapper

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Well, failed there, but happy ending.


View attachment 50160

By American standards; here's my bicycle parking. By Dutch standards, there's my huge shed. Once all furniture is out, workbench on the right is in, planesies in the middle!
I like small shops, they have unique advantages like efficiency etc. They force you to be organized.
 

cluttonfred

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In my many homebuilt aircraft sketches and doodles over the years, I try to keep the size of various components (but not the completed aircraft, though I have tried that, too) down to the door size and interior dimensions of a 20' ISO shipping container, both to limit the size of the workshop required and to provide a lower-cost but still secure hangar option for the completed aircraft. The critical dimensions are about 18' length, 7' height and 7' width to leave clearance through the doors.


20′ ISO container
Interior dimensions
Length 19′ 3″ 5.867 m
Width 7′ 8 19⁄32″ 2.352 m
Height 7′ 9 57⁄64″ 2.385 m
Door aperture
Width 7′ 8 ⅛″ 2.343 m
Height 7′ 5 ¾″ 2.280 m​


That's a modest workshop even by European standards and really does eliminate the "I don't have space to work" excuse for all but the smallest houses or apartments. A typical single-car garage, even in Europe, is generous by comparison.
 

gtae07

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Nice job.

I also have done projects that I enjoyed, and was glad that I did, but would contract the next one.
Yeah, this is one of those. I learned a whole lot about construction, building codes, and so on, but I also learned that I am a terrible project engineer (blew schedule by 233% and budget by about 60%). The knowledge will come in handy if/when we move somewhere else--we want to try and build new if we can so we're taking advantage of the latest building codes and can get things done the way we want, and it will help us be better informed. Renovation might be fun if you don't have to live in the house while it's being renovated, but I've seen too many horror stories about older houses and scope creep.

Do you have a build thread here? Would like to follow one.
Not right now. Maybe I'll get one started later. I have a little bit of one on VAF, but I only started it at the end of last year when the wings were pretty much done.

Would also note that getting married change my life very little, but having a child made a major change. As cr said, family / child are higher priority than airplanes.
Yeah, it's a huge change. It's been harder on my wife--she has almost no prior experience with babies, she's stuck at home unable to drive for at least another month or two (medical stuff), and we're pretty sure he likes me better:nervous:. We're working out how to make sure each of us gets time to do our own thing for some recharge time (working on the airplane for me; painting for her).

But, I have a set of Sonex plans waiting for him, assuming he's interested and can fit in it. We'll make a project of it and if he sticks with it, it's his when he gets his license.
 

BJC

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Yeah, this is one of those. I learned a whole lot about construction, building codes, and so on, but I also learned that I am a terrible project engineer (blew schedule by 233% and budget by about 60%). The knowledge will come in handy if/when we move somewhere else--we want to try and build new if we can so we're taking advantage of the latest building codes and can get things done the way we want, and it will help us be better informed. Renovation might be fun if you don't have to live in the house while it's being renovated, but I've seen too many horror stories about older houses and scope creep.
When I retired and we built a house and hangar on a wooded lot, we contracted the total construction of the house, the hangar shell and the driveway / hangar pad. I did all the landscaping, except for sod, and built a workshop, bath and kitchen / office in the hangar, all heated / cooled, and the fire pit behind it. I spent two years, almost full time, and enjoyed most of it. The fire pit convinced me that I could not have made a living as a brick mason.


BJC
 

Jay Kempf

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Well, failed there, but happy ending.


View attachment 50160

By American standards; here's my bicycle parking. By Dutch standards, there's my huge shed. Once all furniture is out, workbench on the right is in, planesies in the middle!
I'm American and my bicycle parks in way more space than that! Just a data point to confirm. :)
 

Twodeaddogs

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Jan 18, 2009
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Dunlavin, County Wicklow,Ireland
I can confirm autoreply's assertion about Dutch use of space. We holidayed in a town in Holland in a house owned by a four person family. It was a ground floor, first and second storey house, skinny as a rail and every spare inch had a locker or a bookshelf or a storage slot in, on, under or over it. Nothing was wasted.
 

PTAirco

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Sep 20, 2003
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Corona CA
The one thing I really crave is a "dirty" space. A separate area or building for doing all the grimy, dusty, messy stuff and painting. It's a luxury few of us can afford. Those living in the country and in moderate climates can always do some of these things outside, but if you're confined to one space, you'll learn to accept that everything will have a coating of whatever substance you just removed or applied.
 

Kevin N

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Jan 23, 2015
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Your Moms basement
Two things that are impossible to have too much of, money and workshop space. I have a 1500 sq ft work shop and a couple of other buildings on my property for stuff I don't want in my workshop. Owning 9 motorcycles doesn't help, they can eat up space. I don't do engine work. I like to pay for that as I'm mostly a fabricator and have plenty of metal dust flying around my shop most the time. Any serious wood projects like wings get done in my basement of my house as I don't want my wood projects around my greasy metal projects. I keep one cheapie drill press reserved for wood for that reason. I have a cheap open T hangar at my airport which suits me fine. I would like to locate to a residential airpark but for now that will have to wait for my wife to retire from her school teacher job and she is 45, I may not live long enough but you never know.
 
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