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Photo report: Deutsche Museum Oberschleisshiem

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autoreply

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Vigilant1

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Thanks very much, they pack a lot of hardware into that place!

Unafraid to put my ignorance on display, my questions/comments for the assembled masses:
1) Photo 9, foreground of Photo 31: What is this plan and what is going on with the clunky main landing gear/engine nacelle and motorcycle wheels?
2) Photo 50, 51: What is the cone-shaped structure in the cargo area of that helicopter? Is it a hopper of some type?
3) Photo 7, Photo 72, Photo 169, Photo 318: Beautiful airplane and engine "cutaways." I wish more museums did this. I understand the reluctance to carve up a rare specimen, but (to many of us), the interesting stuff is under the skin, and there's so much to be learned by looking inside.
4)Lots of great pictures of the Dornier 31, the only VTOL jet transport ever built. That was a heck of a machine, it must have been a handful to keep it flying.
5) Photo 186: The very thin (and short) wing of the F-104 is a feature that draws a lot of comments, but seeing this cutaway gives a real appreciation for not just the thinness, but the unique structural considerations the thin wing necessitated. Less spar depth = less strength and (esp) stiffness, so an answer was needed, and we see it here. Very nice.
6) Photo 267: My dad used to golf near a USMC base that had a lot of F-4 flight activity, and I would join him to drag his bag. This photo gives a good view of all the "things" stirring up the air on one of those planes in landing configuration. Slats, flaps, always a couple bags of fuel, maybe a gun pod, gear doors, the big (designed for the USN) main gear structure--it's hard to appreciate the godawful screaming ruckus these planes made in this configuration unless you've experienced it. Still, to me, the F-4 is handsome in a "brute force, no finesse, all business" way.
7) Photo 334: But, can it do the all-important "flat turn";)

Danke!
 

cluttonfred

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Feb 13, 2010
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Fort Walton Beach, Florida, USA
autoreply, I particularly liked the Raub motorglider that you had already highlighted in the pseudo-jet thread, the scratch-built pusher microlight, and the little biplane at the very end, not to mention the Natter under restoration and other cool stuff. Thanks for sharing!
 

autoreply

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Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
10,755
Location
Rotterdam, Netherlands
Thanks very much, they pack a lot of hardware into that place!

Unafraid to put my ignorance on display, my questions/comments for the assembled masses:
1) Photo 9, foreground of Photo 31: What is this plan and what is going on with the clunky main landing gear/engine nacelle and motorcycle wheels?
It was a true homebuilt. Some Ossies (the East-German kind) built it in their basement and planned to fly over the wall. Two tiny 2-stroke motorcycle engines if memory serves me right.
2) Photo 50, 51: What is the cone-shaped structure in the cargo area of that helicopter? Is it a hopper of some type?
From recollection; insecticide hopper.
3) Photo 7, Photo 72, Photo 169, Photo 318: Beautiful airplane and engine "cutaways." I wish more museums did this. I understand the reluctance to carve up a rare specimen, but (to many of us), the interesting stuff is under the skin, and there's so much to be learned by looking inside.
In the workshop they were actively (re)building an airframe of mixed construction, just to show off typical steel, wood and tube structures. Destined to be placed in the main museum in 2020.
4)Lots of great pictures of the Dornier 31, the only VTOL jet transport ever built. That was a heck of a machine, it must have been a handful to keep it flying.
Yeah, one of my personal favorites. It's only exceeded in madness by the VTOL Starfighter with 6 straight jet engines solely for vertical take off:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/3yhyrp22kdzj7dj/AADgU2SBsLIFRl9vlK2stn_3a/2018-02-05 12.47.33.jpg?dl=0
6) Photo 267: (https://www.dropbox.com/sh/3yhyrp22kdzj7dj/AAC_7vokL0aS5TPAEGTytJnGa/2018-02-05 14.16.52.jpg?dl=0) My dad used to golf near a USMC base that had a lot of F-4 flight activity, and I would join him to drag his bag. This photo gives a good view of all the "things" stirring up the air on one of those planes in landing configuration. Slats, flaps, always a couple bags of fuel, maybe a gun pod, gear doors, the big (designed for the USN) main gear structure--it's hard to appreciate the godawful screaming ruckus these planes made in this configuration unless you've experienced it. Still, to me, the F-4 is handsome in a "brute force, no finesse, all business" way.
Interestingly enough you missed the most important detail:

What to with your girlfriend is she is less interested in airplanes than you are.
She was actually sleeping; there wasn't a soul around anyway



I was personally most impressed by this one:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/3yhyrp22kdzj7dj/AADOq16ieqPtFjgHzJmusD6Xa?dl=0&preview=2018-02-05+13.52.53.jpg

That's 0.1mm thick corrugated titanium sheet as the rocket outer body.

That's 4 thousands on an inch thick.
 

Riggerrob

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Sep 9, 2014
Messages
1,596
Location
Canada
Most of those cutaway engines went to technical schools. They trained a generation or three of mechanics. After the Air Force retired that model of engine, obsolete training aids were donated to museums.
 

Rienk

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Oct 11, 2008
Messages
1,366
Location
Santa Maria, CA (SMX)
What is the motor-glider in 201 (and maybe 204)?

I love the UL-Arco (141-146). Motivating to see a 65 year old start a design project, and see it flying after he was 70!
 
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