Peter Sripol is at it again...

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Victor Bravo

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What on earth is the possible advantage of using Gorilla Glue in an airplane, in comparison to the many different advantages of epoxy, Titebond, FPL-16, or Resorcinol?
 

TFF

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It’s easy to use but I don’t think it’s used like it was in RC like early 2000s. Most have returned to epoxy with the high end pattern plane foam wings. Epoxy comes out in top, but if you don’t need all the performance and you like it, ok. It’s at the bottom for me personally.
 

Dana

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Take a look at this thread; in particular the pdf linked in the first post which reports on various wing rib constructions including several different approaches to capping foam ribs.
 

PredragVasic

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There was some debate some time ago about the purpose of Sripol's flying designs, how they affect any future youth participation in aviation, what practical use his planes would have, why he is doing it, etc.

I think it's worthwhile to take a quick look at his channel; we could get a lot of insights into whatever influence he may have on the younger generation, as well as some answers to the questions above.

His YouTube channel was started in 2016 (so, less than five years ago). In that time, he has accumulated some 260 million individual views, with 1.7 million subscribers. His videos are about making things -- he showcases ingenuity and engineering to make all sorts of contraptions. He posts once every 3 - 4 weeks (sometimes more often). His videos are not just aviation-related. Out of several hundred, only four are actual airplanes (that he flew himself). The most viewed ones are things like an amphibious boat-car, RC flying models, etc.

YouTube pays approximately $3 - 5 per 1,000 views. Based on that, even if paid at the bottom of the scale, he has earned (so far) over $750,000, in less than five years (so, $150k per year). That's a senior engineer with decades of experience, in a management position.

I don't expect him to start narrowing his focus on aviation anytime soon. While flying contraptions seem to get decent views (the electric plane MK4 is one of the most popular ones, probably in top 10%), I'm sure he'll still showcase all sorts of other mechanical things. Someone did mention that he made contact with another YouTuber who is aviation-related, and that he was seen at Oshkosh, which may give us some hope that the aviation-related stuff will become more frequent subject of his stuff. The kid is clearly creative, has great on-camera personality, and knows how to script, shoot, edit and produce good video (multiple cameras, drones), so it isn't that surprising that he is successful.

What I see is a typical YouTuber with a strong fan base, vast majority of them millennials and younger. If 1.7 million people are exposed to one of their own (generationally speaking), building and flying an airplane (and throughly enjoying the experience), there's a strong likelihood that many of them, who otherwise wouldn't get any exposure and shown any interest, would get involved with aviation. And if that's the end result, then in my view, he is a positive character.
 

pwood66889

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Thanks, Predrag, for assessment above. Your pointing out the profits Mr. Scripol's vids was of interest to me because I had no idea how the producers of content got paid. Always `preesh enlightenment!
Percy in NW FL, USA
 

Protech Racing

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With 1 in foam ribs.
After my glue test and observing the weak bond of Epoxy to the foam, I added some cloth ( thin cotton Sheet) wrapped around the rib , just behind the high point of the airfoil . So now the glass cap strip was also attached to this wrap, and the covering was attached to the cap strip.
This increased the tension before breakaway of the covering from the cap.
My Dad was( and still is) a Quality control engineer.. So much tested was involved. The standard contact covering glue was weak compared to the Gorilla glue . Many concerns were about the GG of course. We made some samples and sun tested them as we built. A couple of hurricanes blew my time frame out by a couple of years . The sun toasted the naked GG and it failed easily. But the latex painted GG stayed well within tolerances.
The GG was the glue of choice and made it easy for the 10 yrs of the Lifespan of the aircraft, parked outside for 3 yrs. Flown over 150hrs ,almost daily flights. Lovely time cruising above the highway @ 54MPH , watching the cars wizz past at 75.
 

PredragVasic

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Thanks, Predrag, for assessment above. Your pointing out the profits Mr. Scripol's vids was of interest to me because I had no idea how the producers of content got paid.
I don't have direct, personal experience with this, but I did some googling and those are the YouTube payout figures I had uncovered. I knew they were (relatively speaking) quite low (per one view).

There are several aviation-related YouTubers (mostly bush planes flying various wilderness adventures), such as Trent Palmer or Jonas Marcinko. The most popular of them rarely get more than a low six-figure view counts. Marcinko admitted in one of the videos that his YouTube revenue averages out to a few thousand dollars per month and varies wildly, depending on the popularity of a video. They all seem to produce at about the same pace (one every few weeks), and their target audience seems to be mostly YouTube generation. From the YouTube perspective, Scripol is in a different league altogether, even though their production value doesn't fall behind his (they also use multiple cameras and drones, and know what they're doing with audio and video). Obviously, his content has much broader audience and appeal.

My point is, while Scripol is one of those few very successful YouTubers, there are a few 'smaller potatoes' who produce aviation-oriented content, and who also seem to have some decent following, and can scrape a living doing what they love.
 

Dana

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I think Peter's success is that everything he does is comprehensible and not completely out of reach of his young audience, the viewer thinks, "I could do that," even if they never will. More mainstream aviation videos don't hook the young audience because it's at a much higher level of cost and complexity, from where they're at the $10K cost for a pilot certificate seems out of reach. What's even more impressive is that Peter does it without having a hot woman in every other clip, or at least on every thumbnail, like so many of the others do.
 

Vigilant1

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My point is, while Scripol is one of those few very successful YouTubers, there are a few 'smaller potatoes' who produce aviation-oriented content, and who also seem to have some decent following, and can scrape a living doing what they love.
I do think Peter is good for homebuilt aviation in general. I'm some respects, he's today's equivalent of the Popular Mechanix articles (with the Aerosport Quail, etc) that I saw as a kid. They captured my interest and I still remember them today, even if I never built anything from them. Peter does refer to some of the important factors/considerations in his designs even if he doesn't provide nearly enough info for viewers to do their own analysis. I'm glad he's successful, and hope nobody gets hurt trying to do their own TLAR flying machine without due consideration for the work required to do it safely.
 

TLAR

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Take a look at this thread; in particular the pdf linked in the first post which reports on various wing rib constructions including several different approaches to capping foam ribs.
Dana, so Sky Pup ribs are very stout huh?
Is that an acceptable method of testing?
 

Dana

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Dana, so Sky Pup ribs are very stout huh?
Is that an acceptable method of testing?
Not an acceptable method for testing a complete wing design, no, but it does give useful comparative info information about different construction techniques.
 

Tinworm

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There was some debate some time ago about the purpose of Sripol's flying designs, how they affect any future youth participation in aviation, what practical use his planes would have, why he is doing it, etc.


What I see is a typical YouTuber with a strong fan base, vast majority of them millennials and younger. If 1.7 million people are exposed to one of their own (generationally speaking), building and flying an airplane (and throughly enjoying the experience), there's a strong likelihood that many of them, who otherwise wouldn't get any exposure and shown any interest, would get involved with aviation. And if that's the end result, then in my view, he is a positive character.

It hadn't occurred to me that Sripol's fan-base would be mostly young, but if so, and if it encourages them into aviation, that is all to the good. But speaking as a naive 57 year old with a hankering to start building, what I admire about him is that he is NOT part of the establishment, so does things which others, including apparently people here, consider unconventional.

As to the "what practical use" question, my heart sank!
 
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